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CraigC

STROBES OFF?? during day??

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whats the truth from real pilots??is it different for big jets/heavies and GA twins??thanksciao!Brian S

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no... Strobes are turned on during the day as well... its one of the checklist items before takeoff...

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The only thing you are required to have on during the day is the rotating beacon. However in the real world, I turn on anything that blinks to make sure I'm as visible as possible.

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>The only thing you are required to have on during the day is >the rotating beacon.Seems to be correct... I see dozens of a/c mainly approaching rather than departing EDDF, and almost all of them do only have their beacons on unless at night of course. No strobes, no nav lites.Etienne :-wave

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I turn them on always! Day or night. Don't need any ducks flying into me ;-)

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Hmm very Strange, the plane's at EDDF Don't have any Stobes or Nav Light's on??!! Remind me not to take a plane there! LOL, no one will see the plane in the air! :)

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Strange, because it's procedure for airliners to switch on the strobes upon entering the runway.Unfortunately there are quite a few GA idiots out there who are proud about having strobes and they turn these on,even while taxiing around on the airport on the taxiway and apron.RegardsBernt Stolle Capt CRJ

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Yeah, they leave them turned on at night while on the ramp! :-lol But seriously, I dont turn mine on during the day. My beacon is the only thing that gets turned on unless I have any doubt about visibility. I see alot of guys who do turn them on, but I personally think strobes on GA aircraft during the day is unnecessary. Craig

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>Unfortunately there are quite a few GA idiots out there who >are proud about having strobes and they turn these on, >even while taxiing around on the airport on the taxiway and >apron. I have to grin............... because one day, even the "Captains" may return to their "roots" as a GA pilots. I know this, because I'm in my fifties and many of my friends and aquaintences are either still active or retired commercial pilots (737,757,767,747's as examples)who now, once again ........enjoy GA flying in their own speedy experimental classification aircraft. Van's RV's, Harmon Rocket's, Glasair's, Lancair's, etc.L.Adamson --- Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA)

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Someday I'll be an old foggy flying a RV or Lancair. But for now, I must work my way up to ATP.--------------Paul Meyerwww.KryptonAir.comwww.LAARTCC.org

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>....because one day, even the "Captains" may return to their "roots" as a GA pilots.I wouldn't like my job that much if I couldn't fly Katanas or Remorquers in my spare time. I like beeing a GA pilot very much :-)I just don't like it, if GA or even airline pilots do something stupid that affects me,like blinding the A/C behind them with the strobes ;-) Bernt Stolle Capt CRJ

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While we're in the suject, are landing light turned on during landing only or also during rotation?And are they only turned on at night or also in daytime?Thanxxxx :(

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landing lights are always turned on during landing by an airliner,even during daytime.this makes it much easier for the tower controller to spot the aircraft

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And to add to that, most airliners that I have seen have alternating landing lights on approach (I think it might help the tower identify an aircraft approaching for landing as opposed to all other aircraft). By alternating I mean that they blink back and forth from one wing to the other. My reason for posting this is because all of the guys here who love to fly the iron and love to have it as real as it gets, I have never seen this modeled on an FS aircraft.Craig

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Someone,You are incorrect. Check out 91.209. You're required to have your anticollision light system on unless it compromises safety. This can be either a beacon or strobes. A beacon is considered an anticollision light, however if the aircraft is equipped with strobes they must be on as well.skyy

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I've seen some old Piper's that have strobes hard wired onto the master switch. This might be because Piper used strobes instead of a Beacon as an anticollision light at one point in time, i'm not sure of the logic :).Skyy

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I fly a 172SP and the strobes go on prior to entering the runway as per the checklist we use. Basically if it lights up it goes on lol.

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Craig,landing lights are the lights on the front wheel,the landing lights on the wing are the wing lights and normally don't alternate,only the strobes alternate

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Strobes are a compulsory light element, no matter in the day or night. It is turned on before entering the runway and turned off after vacating the runway. Navigation lights are compulsory in the night for others to determine the correct side of the plane. Left wings carry the red light and the right is fixed on with the green one, it goes the same for ships. Not compulsory in the day, varies according to airline policies but definately needed to be turn on in the night. Some airlines like Qantas have a policy on their aircraft of taxing with all lights on, which includes landing lights, taxi lights and runway turnoff lights while airlines like SQ the decision is up to the discretion of the pilot.Cheers,alvin

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Well, I cant find anything on it by doing a search, but I do know what I saw. And yes, I know the difference between strobes and other lights on the aircraft. I dont know what they are called, but Ive seen it a thousand times. The only time Ive seen them is when an airliner is working the approach. Hopefully I can get some valid information on that, and when I do, Ill let you know.Craig

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If memory serves correctly, I have seen a Southwest aircraft with alternating landing lights. It looked like it was trying to pull over the Delta 767 in front of it! :-lol

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What you saw was a system called the Pulselite. It causes the aircraft's landing light(s) to alternate on and off. It does not actually turn them on or off, but rather dims them in a fashion similar to a rheostat. It is marketed as an option that serves to both increase conspicuousness and lengthen bulb life. In the USA, Southwest has this system fitted to their aircraft. You will see the landing lights on the wings of SWA aircraft alternate on and off. The "wing lights" which the other poster described are actually used for ice inspection and are pointed from the fuselage towards the wing leading edge and are not part of this system. 737s do have landing lights in the leading edges and retractable ones on the undersurface near the wingtips. There may be one other airline that uses it but I cannot remember which.

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