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Guest GrantM

Thinking of switching to the Mac X OS...any ideas?

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I am on the verge of switching from the Windows world to the Mac OS world. There are several reason why but I won't go into that here. I am looking for info from those of you who use flight sim products on the Mac. Does it work well? What are the drawbacks? Can you use any of the great add-ons available? How about hardware peripherals for flight sims? Also, are there any fps issues as in the Windows world? What type of Mac OS are you using for flight simming?...etc., etc.Thanks,

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You probably do better to ask this question on the X-Plane or FLY! forum where there is MAC support for the flight-sim.Regards.Ernie.

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Hi:I have a G-4 Dual 833 system with a 17inch digital monitor, which I purchased about 2 months ago. Fly 2 will not work in OSX you have to run it in OS 9.22. It works fine in this program. I think it works better than in a standard PC. Reason Fly 2 does not work in OSX has do with joysticks. Joysticks don't work at least most don't work in this evniornment. Hopefully, Apple will fix this so it can run in this platform. I would recommend you get Virtual PC for MAC, for Windows either 98 or XP. I have the XP version, and you can run Flight Simmulator 2002 in this. There are some sound problems and some graphic problems, but Flight Simmulator will run. Its quite nice. X-Plane does work in the MAC, I would also purchase Fly 2 for MAC. You can get it from Apple or perhaps other places also. There is a update available. If you have any questions, let me know. Do get Virtual PC, is a good investment if you want to run other PC products in you MAC.Charles char121h@pacbell.net

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On the Mac OSX side of the world, there is only one choice. X-Plane.It is native on OSX, and runs like a dream (Open GL). The amount of add-ons compared to MSFS is nowhere near as large, but many consider X-Plane to be one of the finest simulators available, and very realistic.

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I'm in a similar situation in that I no longer wish to use MS software for much longer and have been looking at alternatives. I had been thinking of Linux but was worried about my flight simming. After I tried x-plane and saw how well it ran, that put Mac right up there into contention. As has been pointed out, x-plane is native to Mac and ported to Windows, and it already runs great in Windows using OGL. After trying it you will laugh at how much time you spent with MSFS reading / talking / worrying / tweaking frame rates. I'm thinking I might end up running a Mac for x-plane and a Linux PC for office / internet stuff. Certainly the www.x-plane.org forums are full of Mac users if you want to get into the nitty gritty of it all.

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Hmmmm, I went the other direction. After years of using a Mac, I took the plunge and bought a PC, mostly for flight simming. I just got fed up with the lack of software and the extortion for hardware. I realize this is subjective, but started out on X-Plane on the Mac and am running FS2002 on the PC. Won't go back.Cheers,Todd

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I haven't heard anything in an awful long time but Macsoft was supposed to be porting MSFS2K2 to the Mac OS but It may not happen til MSFS2K4 comes out. :-)RegardsPaul:-cool

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My feeling is that as time goes by more and more options will open up for PC users who would like an alternative to the ubiquitous Windows + MSFS platform. Nothing ever seems to last very long in the IT world. Witness companies like 3dfx that came, saw, conquered and perished. I think that there will be a continued, subtle but solid push to make alternative platforms more freely available and that will only encourage developers to port their products to these alternate platforms or indeed develop for them natively. But it all boils down to anyone being able to walk into any PC store in the world, and the salesman says to him or her: "and what operating system would you like with that?". I've already seen influential trends that MS is starting to lose favour with every man and his dog. Witness the latest utterings from Telstra (arguably Microsoft's largest Australian business customer) about moving to a Linux / Star Office platform.

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I find the claims that Macs have better graphics and performance are just myths. They are more expensive and extremely limited in software options.Besides, they just seem effeminate and toylike compared to PCs. :-lol :-lol :-lol :-lol :-lol :-lol :-lolOk...JK........................................maybe. :-lol :-lol :-lol :-lol :-lol

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I was watching Tech TV, and they said that Apple has a group of engineers that are rumored to be working on getting OSX up and running on an Intel P4 PC system. Apparently, it is running quite stable as OSX.2 and the problems that they are running into are peripheral hardware compatibility.Supposedly they are doing this because Motorola who makes their CPU chips hasn't agreed to continue producing them, and (according to TTV) the fastest G4 chip is a little over 1 GHz compared to the PC which is about to hit 3 GHz. The thinking is that Apple could very well become like Microsoft and primarily be an OS producer while dabbling in small hardware items like the Ipod. If this were to happen, then you very well could have the choice of ordering a Dell or Compaq and having to choose Windows XP or Mac OSX.Tim13

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Interesting. A dual boot Win/Mac system would be great, especially if there was some cross-platform software application compatability.

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Well, thanks to all of you for your kind thoughts and helpful insight. I think I will still keep a Windows PC up and running while I explore the Mac OS world. I'm just a little of the constant changes in the Windows world. I'm a Senior Network Engineer working on my Win2k MCSE. I support the full Microsoft line of products for my company and have grown tired of being forced by Mircosoft to keep up the constant upgrade battle with all of their products. Each support pack, service pack, patch and hotfix brings new problems and challenges. The Mac OS seems to be more stable with less updating and patching. Anyway, I'll give it a try for a while to see if the grass is any greener on the other side.Thanks again for the excellent information.

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>Hmmmm, I went the other direction. After years of using a >Mac, I took the plunge and bought a PC, mostly for flight >simming. I just got fed up with the lack of software and the >extortion for hardware. I realize this is subjective, but >started out on X-Plane on the Mac and am running FS2002 on >the PC. Won't go back. >>Cheers, >Todd Ditto !

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I own two Macs, one PC, and one Linux box. I bought the PC for gaming. Period. There is no question that if you want to play the latest and greatest games, a PC is the way to go.The Linux box is a development toy. Basically. To learn about it, and to familiarize myself with the way stuff works.One of my Macs runs my home recording studio. This Mac is almost 4 years old (been running overclocked for over 2 years) and still runs like a champ, with more than acceptable performance for what I ask it to do. It is running an older system 8.6, which has been the most rock solid release for music Apple has ever done. IMHO.My laptop is running dual boot OS9 and OSX (Jaguar). To say that Jaguar is stable is an understatement. I have never (not even Linux), been priviledged enough to run an operating system that just REFUSES to crash and give me problems. It's quite unbelievable.With a little know-how about cross-platform issues and how to deal with them, I can incorporate an OSX machine into just about any Windows environment with no fuss.Because of my gaming bent, I'm still using Windows 98SE on my PC. It's not the most stable beast in the world, but I have it finely tuned and it gets the job done. I have zero conflicts with any games I install. (Not true of Windows XP, I just couldn't get my hardware to play nice with it.) These are the sort of things I never have to worry about with my Mac.I don't think I could give up my PC at this point, and I certainly know I would never give up my Macs! :-) I'm not tied down to one platform, more than anything else because I want to know how everything works, on every popular operating system. If you have the means, I would definately recommend becoming a multi-platform user.

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>I support the full Microsoft line of products for my company and have grown tired of being forced by Mircosoft to keep up the constant upgrade battle with all of their products. Each support pack, service pack, patch and hotfix brings new problems and challenges.

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Jaguar is nice. Before anyone asks, the 1GHz/3GHz disparity is in fact okay... bear in mind that the Motorola processors are RISC, whereas Intel is CISC -- this will lead to precisely this disparity, when in fact if you compare something a little more constructive (like Million Instructions Per Second) you will find that the two appear more competitive.The nice thing about OSX from my view is that it provides an excellent GUI with a rock solid Unix/BSD backend. The reason it doesn't crash is because it has a properly segmented memory model, as implemented in most *nixen. You get the best of both worlds in that there is quite a bit of quality OSX native software, and also LOTS of unix-based software you can run from the Terminal or through XDarwin. Go look at the Fink project (fink.sf.net) for more info.Mac OSX is good. I'm looking forward to Project Marklar myself, too. (The OSX GUI on x86...)--M

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>And are we gonna do if FS2K4 drops win 95/98? erm... - upgrade? I haven't tried running FS2002 on Windows 3.1, but I have my doubts...Derek

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That's just repeating the same old uninformed prejudices about macs.Or maybe you're just trying to stir up an old arguement just for the fun of it ;-) ?Paul

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Upgrading to run FS2004 is one choice. The other choice is not buy FS2004.

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It's going to be a while before I get tired of FS2002. FS2004 is going to have to blow the lid off the can for me to even consider giving up FS2002. For all it's quirks, it is still the best they have done in a LONG time.

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Ken,I live in both worlds for work and play, having a PIII 1Ghz running W2KPro at home and a G4 running Mac OS Jaquar at work. I find the only difference is more choices in software in the Windows world obviously. I have your same sentiments about the MS world of unreliable, insecure, constant upgrading, and EULA changing software it seems every month. But for flight simming, the Windows world offers the most. I started out simming with Mac but now it can only offer you FLY! (no longer supported and out of business, and not on OS X) and X-Plane (which I was one of the original buyers at $229, felt a bit ripped off at the time but it was the only Mac flight sim in town and my opinion of it now is a bit amateurish to what I have experienced in MSFS2K and FLY!II). I would stick with a good beefy pentium machine in lieu of a Mac for flight simming since your choices are so limited in the Mac environment, especially OS X. As far a Jaguar, wow 10.2 is awesomely stable, intuitive... what I like over the windows environment, which many feel is a real computer because they can manipulate so much of the internals of hard and software, but the Mac OS is really ingenious for knowing how people really use the computer and making an OS environment that allows you to get the work done you need to get done, quickly and efficiently.. that is what it is all about. Good luck on your decision making.GrantM

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Sadly, the "latest and greatest" games are more, and more, being developed for consoles like X-Box and Playstation. PC users may in the not so distant future, find themselves in the same boat as mac users - no software for their expensive computers.

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