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C177RG Turbo shutdown

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Being a turbo, are there any special procedures involved in shutting down the engine to avoid seizing up the turbocharger? I can't find any mention of this in the POH provided by DF, since they're for the non-turbo model.Thanks

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bump to see how many people have viewed this...the 0 bug is back.

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Maybe try the Dreamfleet forum. I would like to know that myselfAndrew

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Most turbocharged engines need to be idled for a few minutes to let the trmp decrease. this goes weather its a Cessna 177 Turbo or your subaru :-)Brian

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Thanks for a great link. The article makes for a very interesting read. The author does a great job of demonstrating how you can manage heat during the descent. He also has a good point about avoiding prolonged idle time prior to shutdown.

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>Most turbocharged engines need to be idled for a few minutes >to let the trmp decrease. this goes weather its a Cessna 177 >Turbo or your subaru :-) >>Brian I remember someone at work had one of those Mitsubishi Lancer Evo thingies and the engine carried on running for a few minutes after 'shutdown.' Quite strange for a car to sit there in the car park running by itself...

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Or an 18 wheeler! If we had worked the engine much, as in pulling a steep grade, we would always let it idle a short time before shutting down. If the truck was just under a normal, driving condition, (not requiring any extra power), we would just shut them down. I would think the same applies for a turbo aircraft engine. By the time one would taxi in and park, it would be sufficiently cooled down.Darrell

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>Or an 18 wheeler! If we had worked the engine much, as in >pulling a steep grade, we would always let it idle a short >time before shutting down. If the truck was just under a >normal, driving condition, (not requiring any extra power), >we would just shut them down. I would think the same >applies for a turbo aircraft engine. By the time one would >taxi in and park, it would be sufficiently cooled down. >Darrell I hadn't even considered trucks! I associate 'turbo' with fast - only natural I suppose. The weird thing about the mitsubishi was that even after you'd taken the key out, locked the car and gone off somewhere it carried on running by itself. I don't think I'd trust it - reminded me of Christine if you've ever seen it/read it. :-)

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I have not read the article but I have a good bit of time in turbo airplanes and I own a turbo diesel truck.... You must let the turbo idle after flying or driving at highway speeds whatever be the case but it is not only to disapate heat... The turbo turns at a high RPM, about 20,000 or so and you must drain off the turbo speed before turning off the engine as the turbo bearings are oil fed... IF you do not let the RPM drain off and turn off the engine then turbo bearings are running dry and the bearings are damaged from running down with out lubrication... The turbo does not last long if this continues for long... If you blow a turbo the engine continues to pump oil thru the turbo line and out the tailpipe.... On the highway it's not much of a problem except for the cost of replacement... On my truck it would be about $1500... But in the air you really have a problem if you see what I mean...Ron MashburnCFII Retired

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Close, but there's more to it than that. Turbo's obviuosly since they use engine exhuast, soak a lot of heat (and noise..turbo's don't need much muffler)..my Car Turbo can glow bright red after a high speed run. If you shut if off hot, then oil that is left in the tiny passageways, cooks. This is known as "Coking". It blocks up the passageways, preventing oil to flow to the bearings, and this creates the Turbo Failure on subsequent usage. Most Turbo's are Oil Cooled...lot's of flow past the bearings, some also have Water Cooling channels. What keeps the engine running after the key is removed is known as a "Turbo Timer". A very popular add-on for Auto's.For Aircraft, the Taxing after landing to your parking spot, is suffucient to cool the Turbo since its running all that time at a low stress level. Whenever I park my car, I always leave it running for a minute or two before shutting her down.I plan on building a personal 5 place aircraft someday, and I'll put a Rotary Turbo engine in her. 300HP, 240kts, 18-20K' with a pressurized cabin. She rock! :D

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Thanks for the additional info... My post was getting a little long and I was sticking to the basics to keep it from running really long... But you are right, There is more to it... My Post covered the the basics of turbo operations.... I always let my truck idle and allow the turbo to spin down and cool a bit also...ThanksRonI should have said good luck on your build project also... Sounds like a great one to tackle and a lot of work so I wish you much luck with it...

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