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Please explain this approach chart

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Hi This approach chart is for the NDB approach into the town of Rockhampton , Australia.You can see that it incorporates a right hand turn hold of 140/320 degrees. When you are cleared to commence the approach you go outbound on 320.When would ATC clear you for this approach ? - because after you cross the NDB and do a right turn to go outbound on 320 , you are going to be a long way left of the 320 outbound NDB track. So why is the hold pattern , a right hand pattern and not a left hand pattern.I'm not a real pilot - so obviously I am missing something.Thanks Barry

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Holding patterns are often designed to prevent overflight of built-up areas, especially petrochemical industry and residential areas (not to mention nuclear powerstations).

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I'll assume you've been given a hold at the NDB. At some point you are cleared for the approach. If I am inbound to the NDB, I'll continue to it, make my right turn as outbound , then turn to maybe 360 to intercept the outbound track and fly the procedure turn. If I am out bound in the holding pattern, I'd probably turn to 360, intercept, fly the procedure turn and the approach. Is that what you mean?

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Could you post both the PLAN and PROFILE VIEWS of the plate so that we can better see the visual description of the procedure.Chris de Barros/MYNNBahamasair DHC8-300

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I don't really see anything unusual about this approach. ATC could clear you for this approach at anytime, to answer your question. They most likely (if they have radar coverage) would give you vectors for the final approach course. You simply intercept it and shoot the approach. If they weren't able to vector you for whatever reason then you would have to fly the full approach. I don't see the IAF here, but I imagine its probably the NDB itself, soooo, you fly to the IAF (Initial Approach Fix) and then proceed outbound on the procedure turn. The hold here is more than likely put there primarily for the missed approach. Also, a standard holding pattern has right hand turns. A non-standard hold would be to the left.

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>I'll assume you've been given a hold at the NDB. At some >point you are cleared for the approach. If I am inbound to >the NDB, I'll continue to it, make my right turn as outbound >, then turn to maybe 360 to intercept the outbound track and >fly the procedure turn. If I am out bound in the holding >pattern, I'd probably turn to 360, intercept, fly the >procedure turn and the approach. Is that what you mean? Thank you for this explanation. I thought that this procedure would be the case. It is just that it involves the neccessity to do an "intercept" of that 320 track. As somebody else explained, it may be that the hold pattern is determined by other matters - rather than pilot convenience! :)Thanks barry

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I agree. It looks like a fairly typical approach. I would even say 'classic'.Michael J.

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In many instrument approach procedures holds are often used for course reversal or for climbs and descents where terrain precludes normal gradients.In this procedure it looks like the NDB is both the IAF and the FAF. You will need 2 course changes - 1 outbound after crossing the NDB and 1 inbound back to the NDB. Hold entries are pretty well understood (see Rod Machado's course in FS2002) and can be accomplished easily when crossing a fix (like the NDB). Depicted holds also give you guaranteed terrain clearance on the side of the holding pattern. If the hold is depicted on the chart and there are no "NoPT" declarations on the chart, the you are required to use the holding pattern entry to reverse course (assuming you are flying the full approach - no radar vectors).In this procedure I would use a hold entry to set up on the outbound leg after crossing the NDB and then a procedure turn back in to intercept the final approach course.Of course in the real world you will never shoot an NDB approach if you have a choice :).Martin JensenPP-ASEL-IAN182LU - KBED

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The chart depicts the landing procedure for 2 possibilities. Aircrafts coming from west will execute the procedure turn. Aircraft coming from east will execute 360 at the NDB to align...they don't require the PT. Its a standard IAP for NDBs.

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This was driving me nuts, so I found the actual IAP online ...Appears the depicted hold is just that ... a depicted hold. It is not part of the procedure, but for reference if you're instructed to hold at the NDB or VOR. I've attached the procedure for reference.Air Services Australia has the complete set of approach and departure procedures on-line. Flying with the real charts is the only way to go!![link:www.airservicesaustralia.com/pilotcentre/aip/dap/BRKNB01-081.pdf]Rockhampton NDB or VOR approachHave fun ...Martin JensenPP-ASEL-IAN182LU - KBED

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The answer to your original quesion is a little north-northeast of the airport. Look at the chart and you will see two towers north of the depicted holding pattern. In the US, the TERPS manual dictates what can and cannot be done with an approach procedure, and most of it has to do with obstructions poking up into protected airspace. With the hold on the south side of the NDB, you can hold at a lower altitude. If the hold were to the north, you would then have to hold higher, followed by a pretty good descent along with some maneuvering thrown in for good measure.Tim13

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Many thanks for posting the link and the 'original' chart Martin, the one Barry posted made no sense to me :-)

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It indeed changes the whole thing, now that I can see the actual chart!!

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