Sign in to follow this  
tanker

Transition Altitude

Recommended Posts

Can someone explain how transtion altitude is established in Europe? In the USA, it's 29.92 at or above FL180, but it seems to be much lower in some European areas.Thanks, Dale

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

Hi Dale,The Transition Altitude (TA) in Europe varies enormously even within the same country. In the UK Manchester is 5000ft, London Heathrow and Gatwick are 6000ft and others will also be different.FS9 (and FSX I think) are absolutely hopeless at determining TAs and just use 18000ft - the US default. If you were a Radar Contact user the TA is correct for most major world airports and is just one of many improvements over the default ATC. There have been no major improvements in ATC in FSX.For more info visit the RC Forum here on AvSim or click on the RC logo below.Cheers,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the reply. I do use Radar Contact - As I understand it, it sets the TA based on the departure Airport. On a recent flight from Paris to Hilan, Italy, it made for an interesting crossing of the Swiss Alps (cleared the mountains, but very close). TA at Paris was 6,000 ft, but the Swiss Terrain was 11,700 ft, so a barometric pressure different from standard could have resulted in a crash.Am I coreect in assuming the TA over the Swiss Alps would have been higher in real world flying? Would ATC advise the pilot, or does he/she consult a chart?Dale

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,When passing the Alps your pressure setting would/should be 1013/29.92, set when departing Paris and passing through 6.000ft.If you crashed in the Alps that has nothing to do with the local pressure setting (unless it was not on 1013). You should fly at or above the MEA (Min Enroute Altitude), printed on the maps.If you land at one of the Alps airports, you are right, the TA is much higher then for example Paris. TA for LOWI (Innbruck) is 11.000ft, however for LOWW (Vienna) it is 5.000ft.The TA depends on the geographical position (i.e. elevation) of the airport

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My question would be why Europe has to make it so non standardized. Just confuses me. It works fine in N America with a standard 18000 feet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

USA is one country, Europe has zillion countries. That's the main reason. Almost impossible to come to a standard, every country has it's own ideas, politics, etc.Same is true for ATC zones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>It works fine in N America with a standard 18000 feet.That is true but not for enroute traffic flying below 18.000ft.When flying enroute for example at 12.000ft, in the US a pilot keeps changing his pressure setting along the route.In Europe that isn't necessary, he's flying at FL120 all the way with 1013/29.92

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jack,I think it helps make flying so much more interesting. It keeps you on your toes! I rue the day when the EU standardises Transition Altitude.:-mad Cheers,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Dale,Actually RC uses two TAs - one for the departure airport and another for the arrival. Your initial clearance will be based on Transition Altitude and QNH at the departure airport.You don't have TAs enroute. As Egbert said you need to consult charts to establish the MEA for your flight. No point cruising along at FL140 if the 14,000ft Matterhorn is right in your way :-lolYou should enable NOTAMS at Milan. The high ground to the north may prevent you descending as early as Approach would like.Cheers,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>Hi Dale,>>Actually RC uses two TAs - one for the departure airport and>another for the arrival. Your initial clearance will be based>on Transition Altitude and QNH at the departure airport.>>You don't have TAs enroute. As Egbert said you need to consult>charts to establish the MEA for your flight. No point cruising>along at FL140 if the 14,000ft Matterhorn is right in your way>:-lol>>You should enable NOTAMS at Milan. The high ground to the>north may prevent you descending as early as Approach would>like.>>Cheers,Actually, my cruise altitude was FL250. ATC (RC4) directed me to descend to 14000, then 12000. I was also using Active Sky weather, but I don't remenber the barometric pressure. RC4 has been excellent about not placing the assigned altitude below MEA, but in this case my pressure altitude (2992) was considerably lower than the actual assigned altitude, if that makes any sense?Dale

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Dale,<>Slip of the finger. You meant FL140 and FL120 of course :-)<>That would be entirely fortuitous. RC doesn't know about MEAs. Only MSA within 40 miles of the departure and destination airports.<<...but in this case my pressure altitude (2992) was considerably lower than the actual assigned altitude, if that makes any sense?>>Not a lot ;-) You're mixing pressure and altitude. Just remember that you need to be down at FL120 or FL110 40 miles from the destination airport. If you stick to that rule you're not doing much wrong :-)Cheers,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this