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Guest luke77

Default 737 in FS9

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Hi everyone. I've been coming to these forums for a little while but I just registered and this is my first post. I have a question about the default 737 in FS9. I'm trying to learn how to fly this thing and I don't have a problem taking off and cruising. Landing is another story though. It seems to me that this plane seems to want to approach the runway with its nosed pitched too high. I always have to press the Shift+Enter buttons a couple of times to raise the seat in order to see the runway. Is this normal? Am I doing something wrong? I've owned FS9 for about a year now and learned how to fly the other smaller planes quite well and they never seemed to do this. Thanks for any help.

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Hello. It will help if you trim the aircraft for landing by trimming down. I have a button on my joystick assigned to trim down for landing & another to trim up for takeoff. Look at your Settings/Assignments for elevator assingments. My defaults are Num 7 & 8 but I have, as I've said, joystick buttons assigned as well. Happy landings!TerryW.

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Thanks for the replies. Yes I have the plane trimmed properly. The problem is even when the plane is trimmed for a 600fpm to 700fpm descent to stay on the g/s the nose is still pitched up like 3 degrees. If I pitch down to see the runway it will start descending like 1500fpm to 2000fpm and that's way to fast to stay on the g/s. Again this isn't a problem with the other planes. Does anyone else have to raise the seat in the 737 to see the runway while on final or even the ground while in cruise flight? In cruise flight even though the VSI is showing that I'm in level flight the plane nose still seems to be pitched up and all I see is mostly blue sky if I don't raise the seat a couple of times.Thank you

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>the nose is still pitched up like 3 degreesthis pitch is normal for a 737 when on final approach.--

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Hey,If you happen to be near an airport take a good look at at aircraft on approach(Jet Transport, large, medium or small). The attitude will vary slightly from model to model but all have a nose up attitude, nature of the beast unlike bug smashers. I'm not sure what your final flap setting is for landing but the more flap you deploy the flatter your attitude becomes. As there are a lot of other factors that make up this "Attitude or pitch"Flap settingWeight and balanceAirspeedNext time you are on approach let the boards hang all the way down and play with the speed. As you decrease you will notice the aircraft tends to go nose high and the reverse is true. Or, you can try moving around your weight challanged passangers.BTW, I use the default 737, It is not as good looking as some of the others you can download but I have modded the airfile and she is pretty much on the money. If you want to try another good Aircraft, try the tinmouse 737-200.Hope this gives you food for thought,Regards,Douglas - B-707 retired. "Too monts ago I kouldnt spel pilate now I are one"

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Hi Douglas,Could you share what mods you made to the default B-737 airfile? I too like to fly them every now and then when I just want to make a "kick the tires and light the fires" flight. I'm always looking to improve airfiles to make them more realistic.Many thanks in advanceJohn"I are one two, it toek me for monts butt now I can spel pielut"

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This thread is interesting... It's amazing what you don't know unless you've been there. I remember flying jumpseat on FedEx DC10's out of KMSP on various flights. The AOA of those birds is so high on approach (nose high attitude) that the pilots have to lean full forward with the yoke in their chest in order to see the approaching runway. Landing heavies is not like landing a small GA aircraft. Moving your eyepoint in the VC is perfectly justified if the situation calls for it. Flying faster with a lower AOA is not how it's done in the real world.

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because of the wing design of the DC10 that pitch is even higher than what you see on other aircraft of the same 'size'.but, that wing shap is why the '10 was fast at cruise.--

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If you think the DC-10 approach pitch is high, you should take a gander at the old L-1011. Never been in the pit on that one (was to young when they were in their heyday) but I'd watch TWA L-1011s on approach to KJFK all day long and they had the highest approach pitch of any of the other heavies.As to the original poster: It is impossible to determine why your pitch is too high from the information in your post. What is your final approach weight, speed, flaps settings?If you are pitching up so high that you can't see the runway in a 737 your Vref speed is too slow for your landing weight or you are controlling your VS with your elevator / elevator trim instead of your throttle which is a BIG no-no. Also, its the default 737, so don't expect very much.BTW, on approach, trim your aircraft properly the first time and don't trim it anymore. In real life unless your original trim setting was way off on approach, you need to control your descent with your throttles.Also, learn to arrest your descent (flare) with your throttles also. Today's pilots don't flare with the yoke anymore. Airlines are teaching the throttle method now where you actually ADD throttle instead of cutting them and pulling back on the yoke to flare.

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>Also, learn to arrest your descent (flare) with your throttles>also. Today's pilots don't flare with the yoke anymore. >Airlines are teaching the throttle method now where you>actually ADD throttle instead of cutting them and pulling back>on the yoke to flare. >>That's because the chief pilots for most major airlines are retired carrier jocks. Next they'll want an arresting wire half way down the runway. But you're right though, the airlines got tired of repairing damage due to tail strikes when a pilot would get a little overzealous with his flare.John M

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Two words........................TrackIR4.......+........VC view.

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>As to the original poster: It is impossible to determine why>your pitch is too high from the information in your post. >What is your final approach weight, speed, flaps settings?>>If you are pitching up so high that you can't see the runway>in a 737 your Vref speed is too slow for your landing weight>or you are controlling your VS with your elevator / elevator>trim instead of your throttle which is a BIG no-no. Also, its>the default 737, so don't expect very much.First of all thanks for the responses again. Actually I'm going through the ATP lessons(the Descents and Energy Management part to be specific) so I'm not sure what the weight of the aircraft is. I have flaps 30 selected, autobrakes to 3, Vref at about 150 knots. These are the instructions Rod gives me so I follow them. Actually based on the responses so far it seems that this is normal behavior for this plane. I guess I just have to get used to it. Thanks again everyone.

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check your attitude via instant replay from spot view to compare with real approach pics (same ac). then open the aircraft.cfg file (with notepad or word) and de/increase flaps pitch or/and lift to suit your needs (attitude). Rinse & repeat until satisfied.paul@ehgg

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