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Speedbyrd

Atc And Runway Assignments....

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Does ATC ever 'turn the airport around' during an FS9 session? For example at KMIA, runway 12 is now in use with winds 130 @ 6. Sounds about right. So say a little while later the winds change to 070 @ 8. Would ATC now change the runway assignments to 8L/8R/9 ? I had understood that while there were approaches already in progress, that the original rwy assignments would stay in place even though they now contradict the wind. Is that something we just live with or do we have to wait for all traffic to clear? At KMIA I doub that ever happens.

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I'm not real sure how that happens in real life. My Intl airport is fairly busy, but I'll often see days where it's 25L/25R/26, then another part of the day it's 7L/7R/8, but I don't know how they make those switches. I'd imagine a precise moment with a lull in traffic, but for places where the winds/WX changes often, I don't know. Wx around here is almost always calm.In FS9, AFAIK, it'll switch runways often with wind shifts, but I use Active Sky and force the winds to stay while on ground and 100 nm out so I'm not screwed on take-off or approach. May not be the most realistic that way, but it's too hard when flying a Boeing and approach from a GPS to have ATC decide 25 miles out that it'll put me down on another runway. I need more time to program an approach and/or fly from the chart.

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I am not sure about the sim, but I remember being waved off and sent to the other end of the runway about 1/2 mile from touch down at Kona-Kailua in a C310 during a RW approach.

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I'm not real sure how that happens in real life. My Intl airport is fairly busy, but I'll often see days where it's 25L/25R/26, then another part of the day it's 7L/7R/8, but I don't know how they make those switches. I'd imagine a precise moment with a lull in traffic, but for places where the winds/WX changes often, I don't know. Wx around here is almost always calm.In FS9, AFAIK, it'll switch runways often with wind shifts, but I use Active Sky and force the winds to stay while on ground and 100 nm out so I'm not screwed on take-off or approach. May not be the most realistic that way, but it's too hard when flying a Boeing and approach from a GPS to have ATC decide 25 miles out that it'll put me down on another runway. I need more time to program an approach and/or fly from the chart.
I used to 'bird watch' at KMIA quite a bit and the procedure would change depending on what brought about the change. In the case of a sudden weather change like an approaching T-storm, etc., everyone went into a somethng like a holding pattern to bring them back around to land the other way. If it was based on just the wind changing gradually, they would do the same thing and would hold ground traffic stationary, while allowing some traffic to land. Traffic a certain distance out north of Palm Beach was then vectored in the new direction. I was suprised at how smoothly it went with a minimum of delays.

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A r/w runway change at a major airport is a planned, well-orchestrated sequence of events. Each airport has a procedure...and in some places, like Washington D.C., several airports need to make the change together (Washington National, Andrews AFB, and Dulles normally make the change N or S flow together). Normally, a time for the change is established, and traffic/ground holds are set up based on a timeline from that time.As far as FS9, good question, probably just makes the change on winds and starts traffic flowing the other way...doubt it's sophisticated enough to do any sort of deconfliction. Or it might just zap the traffic going the other way and generate new planes to the other rwy. Maybe sometime I'll play with ActiveSky and see what it does.CheersBob ScottColonel, USAF (ret)ATP IMEL Gulfstream II-III-IV-VColorado Springs, CO

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