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WAD3

Fuel temp

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I have to ask this is causing me some real problems. I am currently flying from KSAN to EDDF and I am currently working my way North in the USA on my way to Canada and as expected the temp will drop as I move North. I get the fuel temp low -55 deg (Fuel Jet :( at FL310 so I drop down to FL270 and it is at -51 deg. Is this how it works with modern aircraft to have to drop so low to prevent fuel freeze? I have to ask and I really dont know how it works but it seems the aviation industry could have figured away around this or maybe I am missing something here.And to add to this I once again lose engine 1 and 3 for the second time so I am resetting the flight. :( ThanksAndrew

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Same thing happed to me, I would love to know the solution to this....Paul ( Toronto Canada )

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The manual holds the solution!You may load different fuel types via the FMC on the page 3/3 of the INIT menu...Under FUEL TYPE you can load A (default), A1 (freezing temp -47), or B (freezing temp -50) by simply entering either A, A1, or B and hitting the right line select next to FUEL TYPE.

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The FAA wouldn't issue a type certificate to an aircraft whose fuel temperature would drop below safe value while operating within its established flight envelope. Additionally, if equipped with a fuel heating system, its failure should trip a caution light to alert the crew to unsafe operating conditions. Please review FUEL 40.4 for MD-11 details.

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This isn't a realistic situation.Normally fuel is stored in underground tanks so even in winter its temperature would not be much below zero degrees Centigrade/Celsius and in most cases would be warmer.Standard kerosene fuel worldwide is JetA1/-40It would need a long flight at high altitude and abnormally low upper air temperatures for the fuel to cool to near the warning trigger temperature.Chris G

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The opposite is true.

This isn't a realistic situation. It would need a long flight at high altitude and abnormally low upper air temperatures for the fuel to cool to near the warning trigger temperature.Chris G

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