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fushi

Again, MD-11 Polar Navigation

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My FLIGHT PLAN (Passing over the North Pole):PANC - WP1 (N73 00.0/W150 00.0) - WP2 (N89 58.0/W150 00.0) - WP3 (N89 50.0/E030 00.0) - WP4 (N73 00.0/E030 00.0) - EFHKFL350, descent to ALT1000ft between WP2 and WP3, no Surface WindsAiming at the Magnetic direction has been always applied on the HDG HOLD inspite of being under the TRU heading mode, I have changed the mode from NA to HDG HOLD (167

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hehe you need a hobby mate
And you need to learn some civilised manners. Just because you don't know how to work your MD-11 - even if you have one, doesn't mean you can insult those that are more intelligent that you. If you think FS is geeky and uncool, fair enough. As you get older, you'll probably learn to be more tolerant of other people and their different opinions. Now, go and be a silly boy/girl somewhere else - there must be millions of places on the web for you to play.

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I have been able to fly pass over the North Pole simply with the AP OFF. It's the best way to fly between WP2 and WP3 so far.Sincerely,Kan-ichiro Fushihara

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When this was last discussed, didn't somebody link to a Boeing document which could be summerised as saying "Don't do it unless you know what you are doing" ? Google Boeing Polar Navigation found it.I am curious about your fasination with geographic Polar Regions. Knowing the FS has limited fidelity in these areas, and that airlines deliberatly avoid overflying the poles, I think it is reasonable for the developers to overlook the FMS behaviours required in these small regions. Obviously, you can ask, but I would not expect much effort if for no other reason than nobody is going to say "well done", but plenty will say "you missed this bit" or "Why does it do that". Paul Smith.

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Of cource, I have already read Google Boeing Polar NavigationLook at PMDG MD-11 operating manual FMS.100.32 and http://forums1.avsim.net/index.php?showtop...olar+navigation.I would like to fully enjoy the PMDG MD-11. As I described "Not Perfect but Practical", this is a expedient till full implementation of the polar navigation functionalty mfrantz wrote.Sincerely,Kan-ichiro Fushihara

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Sure I read there are about 4 polar routes (WP1-4) used but the closest any get to the pole is about 80km - and all are 'low altitude' flights.John E

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Sure I read there are about 4 polar routes (WP1-4) used but the closest any get to the pole is about 80km - and all are 'low altitude' flights.John E
? ? ? ?Sincerely,Kan-ichiro Fushihara

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John is correct. Actually considering only widebody aircraft and the possible polar routes they fly today - they don't get closer to the North Pole than around 300 nm, they simply don't have to based on city pairs they fly between.

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Above the North Pole:NorthPole.jpgTake notice LAT: N90- 0.00' on the upper left and W90E030 10.0NM on the ND, LON: E30- 23.70' will be omitted from consideration.Sincerely,Kan-ichiro Fushihara

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John is correct. Actually considering only widebody aircraft and the possible polar routes they fly today - they don't get closer to the North Pole than around 300 nm, they simply don't have to based on city pairs they fly between.
Thanks, I see it's Widebody Aircraft in the real world.Sincerely,Kan-ichiro Fushihara

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Just after the North Pole:After_NP.jpgTake notice LAT: N89- 59.93' on the upper left and W90E030 9.9NM then TRU: 18 on the ND.Sincerely,Kan-ichiro Fushihara

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Above the South Pole:SouthPole.jpgJust after the North Pole:After_SP.jpgTake notice Sea level ALT: 10500 and Radio ALT: 1370.Sincerely,Kan-ichiro Fushihara

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