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Robi77

How to start a 747-400 from cold and dark

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I try to learn how to start the engines of a PMDG 747-400 FX from Cold and Dark.Can anybody suggest proper manual to do this or better describe the process.Obviously I run FSX.Thanks for your help

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I try to learn how to start the engines of a PMDG 747-400 FX from Cold and Dark.Can anybody suggest proper manual to do this or better describe the process.Obviously I run FSX.Thanks for your help
I would run through the pmdg tutorials they will help you alot and the other is to read the manual and then read it again. It can be hard but very rewarding in the end . :(

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There are four tutorials which can be downloaded from the PMDG website to supplement the PDFs you get with the PMDG 747. Alternatively you can find tutorials covering all the operations for the PMDG 747 in a series of articles which appeared in PC Pilot some time ago, so I imagine you'd be able to buy a back issue with the first tutorial in it if you didn't buy those mags at the time (they are very good articles incidentally).There are also a lot of video tutorials on Youtube covering cranking the 747 up, just got to youtube and do a search. Some of these are better than others however, as many are done by people who miss out things which you would really do it if you found yourself in the (actually fairly rare) circumstance of having to start up an airliner from a totally dead state before you piloted it.If you want to do it, that's fine of course, but personally I don't understand people's obsession with doing a start up from 'cold and dark' in the search for 'realism'. Cold and Dark is not a term most real airline pilots would be likely to use, because it's not a circumstance most crews would very often find themselves in. Airliners are rarely handed over to crews in such a state of total unreadiness, as they are usually up and running earning money for the airline, or getting ready to do so again (having just landed from a previous flight). When being prepared for the next flight before the aircrew board, they'd likely be running from the APU, or from auxiliary ground power, whilst under the care of ground personnel. They are rarely simply parked up awaiting a crew with everything shut down, because airlines do not like paying 280 million dollars for an aeroplane only to have it parked up doing nothing (watch how fast companies like EasyJet and Ryannair turn their aircraft around on the ground in between flight for example, and the less 'budget' airlines are not far behind in the speed stakes - Ryannair for example, get rid of their newly-bought 737s after about 5 years, because they get so much use out of them).Al

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There are four tutorials which can be downloaded from the PMDG website to supplement the PDFs you get with the PMDG 747. Alternatively you can find tutorials covering all the operations for the PMDG 747 in a series of articles which appeared in PC Pilot some time ago, so I imagine you'd be able to buy a back issue with the first tutorial in it if you didn't buy those mags at the time (they are very good articles incidentally).There are also a lot of video tutorials on Youtube covering cranking the 747 up, just got to youtube and do a search. Some of these are better than others however, as many are done by people who miss out things which you would really do it if you found yourself in the (actually fairly rare) circumstance of having to start up an airliner from a totally dead state before you piloted it.If you want to do it, that's fine of course, but personally I don't understand people's obsession with doing a start up from 'cold and dark' in the search for 'realism'. Cold and Dark is not a term most real airline pilots would be likely to use, because it's not a circumstance most crews would very often find themselves in. Airliners are rarely handed over to crews in such a state of total unreadiness, as they are usually up and running earning money for the airline, or getting ready to do so again (having just landed from a previous flight). When being prepared for the next flight before the aircrew board, they'd likely be running from the APU, or from auxiliary ground power, whilst under the care of ground personnel. They are rarely simply parked up awaiting a crew with everything shut down, because airlines do not like paying 280 million dollars for an aeroplane only to have it parked up doing nothing (watch how fast companies like EasyJet and Ryannair turn their aircraft around on the ground in between flight for example, and the less 'budget' airlines are not far behind in the speed stakes - Ryannair for example, get rid of their newly-bought 737s after about 5 years, because they get so much use out of them).Al
I agree with you but I am just interested in knowing how it is done.Something new to learn.Thanks for the hints.

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There are four tutorials which can be downloaded from the PMDG website to supplement the PDFs you get with the PMDG 747. Alternatively you can find tutorials covering all the operations for the PMDG 747 in a series of articles which appeared in PC Pilot some time ago, so I imagine you'd be able to buy a back issue with the first tutorial in it if you didn't buy those mags at the time (they are very good articles incidentally).There are also a lot of video tutorials on Youtube covering cranking the 747 up, just got to youtube and do a search. Some of these are better than others however, as many are done by people who miss out things which you would really do it if you found yourself in the (actually fairly rare) circumstance of having to start up an airliner from a totally dead state before you piloted it.If you want to do it, that's fine of course, but personally I don't understand people's obsession with doing a start up from 'cold and dark' in the search for 'realism'. Cold and Dark is not a term most real airline pilots would be likely to use, because it's not a circumstance most crews would very often find themselves in. Airliners are rarely handed over to crews in such a state of total unreadiness, as they are usually up and running earning money for the airline, or getting ready to do so again (having just landed from a previous flight). When being prepared for the next flight before the aircrew board, they'd likely be running from the APU, or from auxiliary ground power, whilst under the care of ground personnel. They are rarely simply parked up awaiting a crew with everything shut down, because airlines do not like paying 280 million dollars for an aeroplane only to have it parked up doing nothing (watch how fast companies like EasyJet and Ryannair turn their aircraft around on the ground in between flight for example, and the less 'budget' airlines are not far behind in the speed stakes - Ryannair for example, get rid of their newly-bought 737s after about 5 years, because they get so much use out of them).
What if it's the aircraft's first flight of the day in the morning, for instance. In between flights, I can understand having systems already running, but if it's the aircraft's first flight of the day, not necessarily so.

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