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bobbyjoh

Can we experience the Jet Stream?

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On the assumption that we download Real Weather can we experience flight in the Jet Stream with FS2002?If that is indeed possible can anybody tell me where and what height should be used to fly in the Jet Stream?Cliff

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Hi Cliff,The location of the jetstream varies by season and by upper level wx patterns. There are also 2 jets in each hemisphere, the tropical and polar jet.For altitude, I think in the tropopause would be the best area- above 35,000'.Bruce.

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Thanks for that quick answer about the best height Bruce.But where should I geographically place the aircraft to catch the Jet Stream?Regards...............Cliff

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Hello Cliff!Bruce nailed it real well! At or above 34,000 is optimal to "ride the wave", however, on your second question, it varies by day of the week. You need to analyze your weather reports and determine this. If you watch the Weather Channell on a periodic basis, you will notice that the jetstream tends to vary day by day by going higher or lower. In some instances, I have seen the Tropical and the Polar come pretty close to each other.Hope this helps! Sincerely,Dennis D. Mullert

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Hi Cliff,The jetstream varies enormously between seasons and the time of day. I live in Colorado, we get the jet here (which is a very narrow band of extremely strong winds) in winter, however it's location throughout the year varies over several states, or even further.You can, however, predict where to find it on a specific day and time by studying current and forecast weather charts. However, as I mentioned in another thread here today, that's a subject way to lengthy to address here (although is required knowledge for the FAA private pilot's exam, and particularly the instrument rating knowledge exam).Bruce.

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Would the jet stream effect be reflected in winds aloft observations and forecast discussions of same? These are reported but I do not know the schedule or search designators.Would Active Sky WXRE which I read includes winds aloft basicly give what is needed here?

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The winds aloft might replicate the jet stream (ie. if you knew over which station the jet was, and at what altitude, if you went to that wind aloft you might see it).To find it, a pilot would go to a weather chart known as the High Level Significant Weather Prognostic Chart, for FL250-FL600. This will show you the actual jet as a line, or a contour. The important thing to remember is that the jet is a product of other things, and is where converging cold and warmer air is deflected to form a "tube" of very fast air. This chart will also show you those factors causing the jet to be where it is- the peaks and valleys in the tropopause, the pressure contours at altitude, and the air masses at altitude. (I'm actually scanning my theory book that I'm currently studying for my instrument rating).This chart is somewhat similar to the surface prog chart which you've often seen in newspapers, with cold fronts, etc. However, you have to realize that the wx is 3 dimensional, and as you go up in altitude all those cold fronts and high and low pressure areas all change. The surface prog gives the surface wx (which is all the newspaper and 99% of us care about), then there are upper and lower level progs for aviation. I go see these at DUATS, a flight planning and aviation site that we pilots use for wx and flight planning. You have to have a pilot certificate number to be able to log in there, or a current FAA medical certificate. AOPA also gives some good wx info with charts that show you this stuff, but you have to pay to be a member, and be an aircraft owner or pilot.Of course, getting access to this stuff is only 1/2 the story, you have to be able to look at hundreds of lines and interpret them. That's another story.One simple way, on any given day: See where the east-bound jet traffic is. The airlines will file with the FAA routes that follow the jet for west-east, and routes that avoid it east-west. If you live in Salt Lake City, and you see a constant stream of contrails above that are east-bound, chances are that right now the jet is right over-head.Bruce.

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I never knew there was so much to learning about the Jet Stream and I'm grateful for the information.I'd imagined it as a river following a well worn path in the same direction.Thanks guys.Cliff

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Hi all. Yes it is like a river. On atlantic crossing ive done it in 6 hours going east and 8 going west. In the summer its not as bad since the jet moves northward making the head wind bearablerich

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If we download actual weather in FS2002 can we link up with the Jet Stream and experience the difference between flying East and West?Regards,Cliff

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Cliff,Using either FSMeteo or ActiveSky you will experience the Jet Stream. However as many have posted here, you have to know its location. The National Weather Service (NWS) Aviation Digital Data Service (ADDS) will provide you with metars, winds, and other weather related charts. Look at the attachment, you will see the dark purple area for TODAY indicates that the jet stream is coming out of the Pacific and into Canada about the Vancover area. Moves south out of Canada around Illinois and then curves back north over Ohio and back into Canada near upstate New York. As you can see from the attachement this is FL360. Flying in any of these areas in MSFS you would experirnce winds in excess of 100 knots. This is not a west to east zonal flow today, but one that starts about 220 degrees and then curves to 320 and then back to about 300 degrees in the eastern US.To "ride" the jet stream you would need to follow this kind of chart.Hope this helpsBob JohnsonDenver, CO

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What is that URL Bob?It's not included in you note.Regards..Cliff

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