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Flight director

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Please I need to know whats the purpose or function ot the "Flight Director". Whats the diference between ON or OFF.Thanks, Jose.

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Please I need to know whats the purpose or function ot the "Flight Director". Whats the diference between ON or OFF.Thanks, Jose.
Check the Learning Center in either FS2004 or FSX. The Flight Director and how it functions is explained in some detail there.

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Please I need to know whats the purpose or function ot the "Flight Director". Whats the diference between ON or OFF.Thanks, Jose.
Forum rules, you need to sign your full name or your post may be locked or deleted. Also take a look at the manuals, it will significantly enhance your experience and enjoyment of the product. Specifically look at the 07 System Operations manual and search for flight director.

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Please I need to know whats the purpose or function ot the "Flight Director". Whats the diference between ON or OFF.Thanks, Jose.
This whole "PMDG" thing might be a little over your head...

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This whole "PMDG" thing might be a little over your head...
Actually when I acquired my first complex add-on I didn't understand what 90% of the systems were for. After doing a lot of reading (including the the manuals :( ) talking with my pilot friends and the assistance of folks in this forum, I was able to start figuring things out. IMHO one of the great assets of the Flight Sim Community are forums like this one which allow folks newer to the hobby or complex aircraft to come and get help. :(

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The flight director is the indicator of the output of the flight control brains. If not coupled to the autopilot the indications are advisory only and the pilot can choose to follow the indications or not. If autopilot coupling is enabled the the AP supplies the commands to the aircraft control systems to result in compliance with the flight director output.A good example is a frequently mandated airline policy of pilots manually flying a take-off procedure to a specified altitude where policy allows auto-pilot coupling. The pilot looks at the attitude indicator for pitch, yaw,and airspeed, and manipulates the controls so they eventually agree with the flight director indications. This is especially useful where minor deviations in visual conditions might be used for obstacle or traffic avoidance making it very direct and simple for the experienced pilot to intercede if necessary. For pitch the pilot would pull back the yoke enough at rotation to get a steady climb rate at an expected pitch and the flight director pitch indicator might slowly lower to meet the actual pitch indication. The initial flight director pitch indicator might be more than what the pilot would want to use.The order of using the FD and AP is first enabling the FD and following its cues and then enabling the AP which uses the FD output.Another example is in turbulent weather. The AP can sometimes over correct in attempting to recover from sudden changes. In this case the AP might disconnect on its own or the pilot will disengage it using the FD output to manually fly the aircraft to perform average corrections to maintain the advised path.That's my understanding, anyway.

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The flight director is the indicator of the output of the flight control brains. If not coupled to the autopilot the indications are advisory only and the pilot can choose to follow the indications or not. If autopilot coupling is enabled the the AP supplies the commands to the aircraft control systems to result in compliance with the flight director output.A good example is a frequently mandated airline policy of pilots manually flying a take-off procedure to a specified altitude where policy allows auto-pilot coupling. The pilot looks at the attitude indicator for pitch, yaw,and airspeed, and manipulates the controls so they eventually agree with the flight director indications. This is especially useful where minor deviations in visual conditions might be used for obstacle or traffic avoidance making it very direct and simple for the experienced pilot to intercede if necessary. For pitch the pilot would pull back the yoke enough at rotation to get a steady climb rate at an expected pitch and the flight director pitch indicator might slowly lower to meet the actual pitch indication. The initial flight director pitch indicator might be more than what the pilot would want to use.The order of using the FD and AP is first enabling the FD and following its cues and then enabling the AP which uses the FD output.Another example is in turbulent weather. The AP can sometimes over correct in attempting to recover from sudden changes. In this case the AP might disconnect on its own or the pilot will disengage it using the FD output to manually fly the aircraft to perform average corrections to maintain the advised path.That's my understanding, anyway.
Many thanks Ron. Jose Landajo

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The flight director is the indicator of the output of the flight control brains. If not coupled to the autopilot the indications are advisory only and the pilot can choose to follow the indications or not. If autopilot coupling is enabled the the AP supplies the commands to the aircraft control systems to result in compliance with the flight director output.A good example is a frequently mandated airline policy of pilots manually flying a take-off procedure to a specified altitude where policy allows auto-pilot coupling. The pilot looks at the attitude indicator for pitch, yaw,and airspeed, and manipulates the controls so they eventually agree with the flight director indications. This is especially useful where minor deviations in visual conditions might be used for obstacle or traffic avoidance making it very direct and simple for the experienced pilot to intercede if necessary. For pitch the pilot would pull back the yoke enough at rotation to get a steady climb rate at an expected pitch and the flight director pitch indicator might slowly lower to meet the actual pitch indication. The initial flight director pitch indicator might be more than what the pilot would want to use.The order of using the FD and AP is first enabling the FD and following its cues and then enabling the AP which uses the FD output.Another example is in turbulent weather. The AP can sometimes over correct in attempting to recover from sudden changes. In this case the AP might disconnect on its own or the pilot will disengage it using the FD output to manually fly the aircraft to perform average corrections to maintain the advised path.That's my understanding, anyway.
That is a pretty good summary of the FD. The FD will tell you how to fly the plane to match your lateral and vertical route that you programmed into the Flight Computer. I find it extremely helpful in takeoffs to get a good pitch so that I gain altitude at a reasonable VS, yet still gain precious airspeed. I however have never found myself using it in final approaches.

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