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jimble

Departure proceedure

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If you are required to file a departure procedure , but the runway has no SID, as in this case 27 at Memphis INT VOR MEM Destination Little Rock. What happens in the real world? Thanks in advance.

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If you are required to file a departure procedure , but the runway has no SID, as in this case 27 at Memphis INT VOR MEM Destination Little Rock. What happens in the real world? Thanks in advance.
why is there a requirement to file a departure procedure?

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why is there a requirement to file a departure procedure?
The no departure procedure box was grayed out.

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http://flightaware.com/resources/airport/K...P/MEMPHIS+SEVENis the only departure basically radar vectors to transition points listed and filed as part of your route. The description offers no runway specific routing, just obstacle clearances and some generic crossing advisories. You would not find an on field VOR MEM in this case used for departure normally unless ATC requires you to loop back over it at as higher altitude that will not conflict with incoming traffic and outgoing traffic.An available real world clearance simply shows KMEM, LIT, KLIT. VOR LIT is in the airport vicinity but does not appear to be on the field. There are no STARs for KLIT.http://flightaware.com/resources/airport/K...+OR+LOC+RWY+22L would most likely be a vectored arrival as the other main runways. LIT is quite south of the runways and you would head toward it then the field until vectors start.Note that LIT is on the Memphis Seven departure plate. This route I would guess is an FAA preferred route and would be handled entirely by Memphis local control handing over to Little Rock approach with no center communications.The flights I looked at show a distance of about 130 statute miles flown at 16,000 feet. The duration for the DC9 was 25 minutes. Go to flightaware.com, click on Don't know flight number on the left. Enter the departure and destination and a list of filed flights will come up. Click on a recent one and when it opens be sure the departure and destination are correct as the same flight number may be used for different legs and the most recent will show.RC4 would probably hand you over to center, don't know.Even for a jet file a low altitude for a flight this short. This is done to keep aircraft on short routes out of the way of longer flights that are passed to center control.This is also a route that could be flown by a turbo prop in many instances as being more efficient. It varies by airline.

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The no departure procedure box was grayed out.
if you drop the MEM vor from the plan, it's not a DP any more. you probably don't actually use the MEM vor for navigating anyway.

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Expanding on jd's reply if you have a waypoint within a thirty nm radius of the departure airport it is automatically a departure procedure. You will receive a fly as filed clearance and be expected to navigate your own path to the first waypoint outside of that radius, RC will not issue vectors.

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Thank you for the replies, and thanks Ron for the charts. I am, at present, practicing finding the correct departure procedures from various airports, and that's why i set up such a short flight.

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Let me suggest you use flightaware.com and examine some short real world routes. Look for an aircraft type that would do regional flying when you open a large enough airport that has DPs. Enter an airport code lower left and click on View Activity. Look at the departure list for flight numbers and the aircraft type. Right click on the flight number and open it in another window. Be aware that sometimes the window opened might be a different route where the same flight number has more than one leg.As an example at KMSP MES3022 tonight shows the route from KMSP Minneapolis to KPIA Peoria, IL. The route is shown as UKN2 DBQ V129 PIA (Decode). UKN2 is the DP extended to DBQ as the transition to the low altitude route V129. Now if you click on (Decode) it expands into individual waypoints in case you do not have a flight planner that does not allow an air route input to expand. You'll note the altitude flown was 17,000 feet. The SF340 aircraft is a twin turbo prop. Airways below 18,000 are V routes and 18,000 and above are J routes in the US.To get the charts as before, go back to the activity window and click on IFR Plates where you'll get the diagram and the opportunity to download that and all procedures bundles into one .pdf.Occasionally in a flight planner you might have to change the version number of the procedure such as UKN1.In UKN2 the first waypoint from the airport is FGT about fifteen miles. This means you'll get an automatic DP status that you will have to navigate - no vectors.The whole trip was 1 hour 8 minutes with the SF340 at a ground speed of 286 kts. PIA's runways are 10,000 and 8,000 feet roughly so you could fly the DP but use a J route at probably flight level 230, 250, or 270 in a regional jet such as the B738, CRJ200, ERJ, or whatever you have in your hangar, for a shorter time but for practice it helps to use a slower turbo-prop aircraft - there is a lot for one pilot to do in a short trip.I've attached the extracted expanded route image using the SF340B at 17,000 from my planner so you can see the distances in the DP.

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