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ryanbatcund

Approach plate help

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Yet Another Approach Plate Question:VOR-A into Redwood Falls, MN... I want to make sure I'm doing this correctly. I'm coming from the east and I want to start at the KUKGE fix but I'm not gps equipped. So I dial in the 283 radial off the RWF VOR and about 9 DME (say I'm traveling at 200kts), I commence a left turn perpendicular to that course (which ends up being a 190 heading or so), and reset my OBS knob to about a 110, so that way I'm twisting the knob in the correct direction as I'm arcing southwest. Once my DME reads 7 - I start the arc procedure....twist 10, center needle, turn ten, twist, turn etc etc - I can fly the arc fine.It's just an odd thing to approach it from the east side so I wanted to make sure I was doing it correctly. Or, maybe I should go direct the VOR and then outbound on the 283 and arc SE???rwfVA.jpgFull chart available for your viewing pleasure here:http://naco.faa.gov/d-tpp/1002/05200VA.PDF

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I see no reason why you would not be able to do it the way you described. KUKGE is a valid IAF and as long as you're able to navigate to it and the ATC clears you for the approach using it as the IAF, you're good to go.That chart gives three points where to start the approach, so if able, just ask for the one you prefer.

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and reset my OBS knob to about a 110,
actually you should reset it to around 300 (and keep reseting every 20 degrees). The idea is that the course pointer on your HSI should always be pointing towards the inside of the arc (towards the center) this way using HSI you have a very clear picture where the center of the arc is and that you are flying perpendicular to the radius. So first 283, 300, 320, etc...

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Hmm I learned the other way.... if I'm flying the arc from east to south I learned to have the needle display what radial I'm on. I guess both ways work.

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For whatever it is worth - I described the method that you can find in a typical IFR text book as well as how an IFR instructor would teach you to do it. The idea is to fully utilize situational awareness that HSI offers. But sure, ultimately it doesn't matter for a skillful pilot.

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For whatever it is worth - I described the method that you can find in a typical IFR text book as well as how an IFR instructor would teach you to do it. The idea is to fully utilize situational awareness that HSI offers. But sure, ultimately it doesn't matter for a skillful pilot.
I guess people teach different - the guy who told me flies CRJ's for a regional carrier

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The biggest drawback of your method is that you would have to swing OBS twice almost 180 deg. Because first you are approaching the arc (IAF) with course = 283 then you switch to 110 (a big twist) then again while completing the arc and preparing to turn inbound you would have to set course to 016, another almost 180 twist. A lot of unnecessary OBS twisting therefore most instructors would find it less than optimal technique. In this other technique you would never have to twist more than an incremental 20 deg. avoiding drastic actions which in this peculiar IFR world are frowned upon.

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Yeah I guess I should have said I was doing it this way for practice.... I just wanted to be sure it was a valid way to join the arc from the east. In real life I would most likely ask for vectors to the final approach course.

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Yeah I guess I should have said I was doing it this way for practice.... I just wanted to be sure it was a valid way to join the arc from the east. In real life I would most likely ask for vectors to the final approach course.
Unless, as the chart implies, there are no approach radar facilities available. :( Anyway, OBS technique aside, you can join this procedure from any direction. Using the DME arc procedure it is probably just as fast, if not faster as taking vectors.

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Well yes, it's under ZMP, not sure which sector... so depending on radar coverage in that area they may or may not be able to provide vectors... then naturally I would join from the airway

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