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Paolo_R

Shiny, reflective aircraft

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I've downloaded some aircraft and they have an unrealistically shiny, reflective surface texture. I know nothing about how to modify textures or anything else technical in FS9 design - but is there a straightforward modification I can make to an aircraft's file(s) to reduce this reflective texture?TIA

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2 Options:Try "Resized Environment Map Texture" by Bart Dylkiewicz in the library, or manually edit the aircraft textures by using photoshop + imagetool to modify the alpha layers.

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I've downloaded some aircraft and they have an unrealistically shiny, reflective surface texture. I know nothing about how to modify textures or anything else technical in FS9 design - but is there a straightforward modification I can make to an aircraft's file(s) to reduce this reflective texture?TIA
I have had a few of these(shiny planes) in the past.I am not sure but have you got the REFLECTIONS option in FS9 DISPLAY / AIRCRAFT menu checked? If so uncheck it and see if that makes a difference .Alternatively depending on what those aircraft are, you could always try another version Andy

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2 Options:Try "Resized Environment Map Texture" by Bart Dylkiewicz in the library, or manually edit the aircraft textures by using photoshop + imagetool to modify the alpha layers.
I think that, given my level of ignorance re FS9 design, the first option is the one I'll investigate.Thanks.
I have had a few of these(shiny planes) in the past.I am not sure but have you got the REFLECTIONS option in FS9 DISPLAY / AIRCRAFT menu checked? If so uncheck it and see if that makes a difference .Alternatively depending on what those aircraft are, you could always try another version Andy
Andy: not sure, I'll have to check it and, if so, I'll switch it off to assess the effect.Thanks.

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Just out of interest.Which aircraft models are you having problems with the shinies ?Andy
Andy: the one which seems hyper-reflective is the freeware B-58 Hustler (by Lucariny?).I looked at the Display/Aircraft settings. At the moment I have the setting on Ultra High for Global Aircraft Quality. If I uncheck 'Reflections' it resets the Global Aircraft Quality to Medium Low (but gets rid of the reflection.) So I'm not sure what I'm sacrificing in the way of Aircraft Quality to get rid of excess reflectivity.

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Andy: the one which seems hyper-reflective is the freeware B-58 Hustler (by Lucariny?).I looked at the Display/Aircraft settings. At the moment I have the setting on Ultra High for Global Aircraft Quality. If I uncheck 'Reflections' it resets the Global Aircraft Quality to Medium Low (but gets rid of the reflection.) So I'm not sure what I'm sacrificing in the way of Aircraft Quality to get rid of excess reflectivity.
Interesting! I am pretty sure i have had reflections unchecked for years and I am perfectly happy with the look of my aircraft. I suppose you could always turn reflections off when you want to fly this aircraft and back on again for everything else if you think it significantly improves the appearance of your other planes..Just checking my reflections option now....No as i thought its off and my global aircraft quality is actually LOW ,but I can assure you my planes look fine.I think if you are still showing MEDIUM LOW then you must also have 'AIRCRAFT CASTS SHADOWS ON' Be advised that option does lower frame rates quite significantly (As I suspect the REFLECTIONS option also does.Anyways cheers Andy

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FWIW . . . the B-58 Hustler was a very shiny, bare aluminum aircraft to begin with.

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Hello, Some interesting deal.gifhttp://www.sim-outho...ght=reflectionsRegards.bye.gifGus.
Gus:yes, very interesting. Thanks.
Interesting! I am pretty sure i have had reflections unchecked for years and I am perfectly happy with the look of my aircraft. I suppose you could always turn reflections off when you want to fly this aircraft and back on again for everything else if you think it significantly improves the appearance of your other planes..Just checking my reflections option now....No as i thought its off and my global aircraft quality is actually LOW ,but I can assure you my planes look fine.I think if you are still showing MEDIUM LOW then you must also have 'AIRCRAFT CASTS SHADOWS ON' Be advised that option does lower frame rates quite significantly (As I suspect the REFLECTIONS option also does.Anyways cheers Andy
Andy: yes, i had thought of turning reflections off for the B-58. So, I wonder what 'Global Aircraft Quality' does and what does it affect?
FWIW . . . the B-58 Hustler was a very shiny, bare aluminum aircraft to begin with.
True, but this model seems hyper shiny!

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Gus:yes, very interesting. Thanks.Andy: yes, i had thought of turning reflections off for the B-58. So, I wonder what 'Global Aircraft Quality' does and what does it affect?True, but this model seems hyper shiny!
Hello againI am not sure what 'Global Aircraft Quality' actually does, but I do know that the beauty of FS9 is its customability ,you can't do ant harm if you decide not to use a certain setting ,for instance I have no water effects set ,not because it might save on frames but because I prefer it that way .As I said in my previous reply my Global Aircraft Quality is low (I don't want aircraft casts shadows option either) but my aircraft look fine. All you can do is play with your settings and see how you like the results.cheers AndyTweaking FS9 is a hobby in its own right.

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Tweaking FS9 is a hobby in its own right.
Andy: I gathered that! Is there anywhere a comprehensive explanation of what the various settings in FS9 actually do?Ideally one should just be able to install a plane and fly it. But I am finding that, as I install planes, the "readme.txt"s usually require some tinkering with one .cfg file or another. Again I haven't seen a comprehensive explanation of what the various entries in the .cfg files actually do. I have no desire to design aircraft but I'm sure knowing a bit more about these settings would be helpful.

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Guest belga1

Hello,

I have no desire to design aircraft but I'm sure knowing a bit more about these settings would be helpful.
Aircraft.cfg .... I read somewhere :Aircraft edits you can do…If you decide to do some edits, this can be a bit of a start point. Note: EVERY time to want to confirm whether a change “took” or not, you must save the file (don’t have to close it though) change to another aircraft, let it load, and then quickly go back to the aircraft you are editing. It will now load the fresh a/c with the new settings.Remember: you can add notes, and backup lines or old numbers, the sim will overlook anything after “//” which makes it easy to keep reference to original values.Aliasing:If you have a favorite panel, or sound set you want multiple aircraft to use, or if you need to add at least a default set for the time being (wasn’t included in the original file?), you can alias the current aircraft to a panel or sounds for another one, by inserting this line into the respective *.cfg file (be it the panel.cfg or sound.cfg):[fltsim]alias=B737_400\soundOr for a panel using a custom panel on a third party plane, would look like this[fltsim]alias=iFDG A319-112 USA\panel>>>>>>>>>>>>In the Panel.cfg:I give the panel setup a .5 zoom for all, much more realistic. Go into your panel.cfg and add this whole section, or see if something similar is there whose numbers you can edit:[VIEWS]VIEW_FORWARD_ZOOM=0.5 //your editVIEW_FORWARD_LEFT_ZOOM=0.5VIEW_FORWARD_RIGHT_ZOOM=0.5VIEW_LEFT_ZOOM=0.5VIEW_RIGHT_ZOOM=0.5VIEW_REAR_RIGHT_ZOOM=0.5VIEW_REAR_LEFT_ZOOM=0.5VIEW_REAR_ZOOM=0.5VIEW_UP_ZOOM=0.31VIEW_FORWARD_UP_ZOOM=0.31Now you can tilt the panel, a value of 16 is great for every helicopter I’ve yet tested, while airliners might prefer between 1 and 6.VIEW_FORWARD_DIR=16.0, 0.0, 0.0Sometimes you may wish to resize a 2d panel, maybe it takes up too much real estate on your monitor, or whatever, but you need to change it’s size without doing massive editing. This also works under the GPS mini-panel value, in case it’s too large or too small.Just change the ratio, this one working very well for the MS Bell 206b (especially with the other edits here):windowsize_ratio=0.5 //0.732Mini-panels often need to be oriented in a location, for instance where your GPS shows up, you can edit this line here:position=8…and you choose the location you want from 0 (top left) to 8 (bottom right) in a grid like this:012345678If you want your mini-panel to show up all the time (meaning you don’t have to click an icon or pulldown menu…say to have the GPS always there, or your radio stack), you edit this line between off (0) and on(1)VISIBLE=1Oh and lastly but not least, down at the very bottom of the Panel.cfg I may edit this line at the bottom to match the top of the 2d panel dash or at least close to it…depending on it’s shape/area, but with the panel tilt this isn’t nearly as important anymore.SIZE_Y=2800>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>In the aircraft.cfg….I change the autopilot vertical speed default so that if I suddenly decide to change altitude, it's not going to violently pitch up or down at 1800fpm, instead being more realistic 500fpm that you can then ease into quicker rates of ascent +decent IMO. Under [autopilot] look for this line and pick 500 or 700 FPM default:default_vertical_speed=500.00 //1800Sometimes I find I have problems with getting the plane to trim properly. This is usually due to the trim not being precise enough (not enough positions for the trim range). So you can change the number from 1.0 to 0.25 or even 0.2 under [flight_tuning] in the following line (keep in mind if the plane flies well, there may be no need for this edit):-elevator_trim_effectiveness = 0.7 //1.0I edit the eyepoint using //longitudinal, lateral, vertical grid (it’s in feet, in decimals). Often some freeware plane makers put this eyepoint at very strange places…like way too far in front of the real flight deck area (in my MD-83 FFX), or sometimes at the wings. To land properly using the panel, it greatly helps to have the eyepoint at the correct real world location. In planes without VC’s, the number usually correspond to the either the engines (pull prop), heli main rotor, or more commonly the wing location.To confirm where the eyepoint is currently set, on a/c that don’t have a VC, and slew the aircraft over to a runway line for a fixed reference, and from the exterior view place the nosewheel on the line. Now take note of where the pilot sits in relation to the front nosewheel, how high, how far back or forward he sits. Now switch to the “vc view” mode and pan down, you now have a fairly good idea of where you should be looking to see the nosewheel, and can “guesstimate” if you are close.In planes with VC’s, editing this will also often give a better forward view for landing. The below example is for the default MS Boeing 747 which you can edit for yourself (the originals are to the right of the //), however I think they use a different starting point for the grid than the a/c wing. Experiment to see where you end up.[Views]eyepoint = -18.25, -2.15, 9.9 // -19.05, -2.15, 9.7 Longitude, Lateral and VertNew lighting for the virtual pit at night. Again using the same longitudinal, lateral, vertical grid, in the [LIGHTS] section of the default MS Boeing 747, add the following line, and then go night flying (pushing L to turn on all lights):light.9 = 4, -16.24, -2.00, 8.59, fx_vclighth,I add differential braking for all planes to help with taxiing, which allows for tighter turning than normal, by adding this line to [brakes]:differential_braking_scale = 1.0I might also edit the brake effectiveness/strength, as some are clearly too easily stopped, while others just can’t stop (like the default DC-3) by changing the value oftoe_brakes_scale = 0.52 //Brake scalarIf you are using a futuristic aircraft or a particularly old one, you may wish to edit the fuel efficiency, less than 1.0 is better fuel economy, while 1.1 would be worse than average, like an old jet engine:fuel_flow_scalar = 0.8>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Weight and balancesI add or change payload/cargo settings, for default to max weight. I also prefer to have multiple points for the aircraft cargo and passenger weights because the plane handles much more realistically when decent values are used. You use 170 lbs (these values are in pounds) for the “average person”, and calculate how many people would be in a forward/center/aft area of the plane, then you figure out where the “center” of that mass would be located. You don’t need to add each and every seat, this would be too time consuming and would unnecessarily tax FlightSim. Instead, use perhaps entries 3 or 4 for the passengers, and perhaps two more for the cargo (remembering that cargo is usually physically located lower in the aircraft, so edit the vertical values accordingly). Ideally you should have between 4 and 10 “station loads” for the best experience.Using the Antonov AN-124 as an example, on the first line, the first number (0) is the numerical order for the various loads. The second (1000) is the weight in pounds of what payload will normally appear here. The following three numbers are the axis location of this station load, this one being up near the front, in the flight deck of the upper deck. The last bit is the weight station description for the virtual pilot to see. You can see the last two loads are way heavier, much lower to the ground, and somewhat closer to the wing in the center, the last load being 43 feet behind the wing:station_load.0 = "1000.0, 50.9, 0.0, 8.5, Flight Crew"station_load.1 = "1540.0, 36.7, 0.0, 8.5, Upper CrewDeck"station_load.2 = "2140.0, -43.0, 0.0, 8.5, Upper PaxDeck"station_load.3 = "35558.0, 36.7, 0.0, -8.5, Fwd Cargo"station_load.4 = "35557.0, -43.0, 0.0, -8.5, Aft Cargo" //Weight (lbs), longitudinal, lateral, vertical positions from datum (feet)So the first line is about “station_load.0”, which is 1000.0 pounds heavy, 50.9 feet from the axis datum of the aircraft (often either the rotor hub or the wing root), 0.0 center of the axis not to the sides, 8.5 feet above the datum, and represents the Flight Crew (in this case two pilots, engineer, perhaps a navigator, and a cruise pilot or two, and their baggage). The “” quotes allow the Flight Crew words to appear in the sim weight and balance section, so that the end user can understand exactly what he might be about to edit.Many people give these station loads empty values, which I think is silly: give it the maximum the aircraft can take off with: it’s easier to remove/give weight on the fly in-game than for someone to “guess” as to what a realistic amount should be when they just want to fly. Also, they handle more realistically too, even if you only give it a partial payload/partial fuel load.With helicopters, the vertical value can be important to simulate carrying a very heavy weight on a sling 30-40 feet down…and you really can “feel” it!Contact points…ok, this is similar in layout to the weight grid, it’s basically a more complex version//0 Class <0=none,1=wheel, 2=scrape, 3=float/skid>//1 Longitudinal Position (feet)//2 Lateral Position (feet)//3 Vertical Position (feet) -4.70, -4.99//4 Impact Damage Threshold (Feet Per Minute)//5 Brake Map (0=None, 1=Left, 2=Right)//6 Wheel Radius (feet)//7 Steer Angle (degrees)//8 Static Compression (feet) (0 if rigid)//9 Max/Static Compression Ratio//10 Damping Ratio (0=Undamped, 1=Critically Damped) 0.9100//11 Extension Time (seconds)//12 Retraction Time (seconds)//13 Sound Typepoint.0=1, -17.40, 0.00, -4.60, 1181.1, 0, 0.6349, 60.0, 0.4000, 1.5, 0.5100, 4.0, 4.0, 0, 0.0, 0.0so “point.0” is just the sequential number of each individual contact point“=1” is the class or type of contact point it is, meaning 0=none,1=wheel, 2=scrape, 3=floatThe next three are just the position location format you are now familiar with. The fourth tells us how hard a landing this gear will survive, in this case 1181, whatever that actually means (PSI of pressure impact? Dunno).The fifth one is the brake map, and I recommend that the nosegear is listed as “0” for none (just like this one is), or it will interfere with the differential braking ability, while the others will need to be listed as either left or right (1 or 2). You will know which one is the left wheel by seeing it has a minus – sign on the lateral position value.The sixth 0.6349 is the diameter of the wheel, if you have wheels. The seventh value will only likely apply to the nosegear, as this determines the degree of freedom the nosewheel will turn for taxiing, here it’s 60 degrees.Eighth is Static Compression, meaning how much will the gear compress 0.40 when the aircraft is parked on the ground. 9th, Max/Static Compression Ratio tells us how much difference there is between the static compression position, Vs the maximum compression position (like during a very hard landing that fully compresses the shock absorbers) here 1.5 (feet? Not sure if just a ratio though). Tenth is the Damping Ratio meaning how hard are the shocks (0=Undamped, 1=Critically Damped) here it’s about half ways at 0.51.The last three only edit the speed at which they extend/retract, and whether a sound should be associated with the event.Great! Now you have finished the first contact point, only 2 to 15 more to go! Remember, you can add scrape points to simulate the tail of an aircraft (or the wings, a low point on the fuselage, or a low-hanging engine), so if you attempt to do a tailstrike, it will generate sparks from the impact, and may even damage the airframe if you are foolish!>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>HelicoptersFor helicopters, I typically make the pitch and roll inertia equal, but sometimes need to add to yaw to settle the tail rotor somewhat:;Moments of Inertiaempty_weight_pitch_MOI= 7000.000 //6000empty_weight_roll_MOI= 7000.000 //4000empty_weight_yaw_MOI= 13000.000 //10000empty_weight_coupled_MOI= 500 //0Then I may make the static pitch at or close to zero, to aid with hovering precision:static_pitch= 0.05 //0.198These two examples are for Jordan Moore’s excellent freeware UH-60 Hawk series (Bhawk, FireHawk, JayHawk).Posted by Jib02Ok --here is a rough Aircraft.cfg tutorial. It should serve to allow the user to adjust an uncontrollable AC and make it fly and land smoothly. I am not attempting to suggest that any changes are more realistic or that I understand or know how to correct engineering calculations. I simply imply that if your favorite AC in MSFS is not as controllable as you would like it to be then I am listing some of the major effective variables to change.I have changed every plane in my hanger and all of them fly great.No longer do I have to contend with snaking down the runway on takeoff or the plane falling out from under me as I turn on to final. I also have cured any tendancy for my planes to pitch uncontrollably when I am on glideslope. They will all hold wings level but still have plenty of roll control.I have not locked my planes on a rail, just made them responsive to my stick control. My planes are a joy for me to fly and if there had not been this easy way to adjust them I would have shelved MSFS long ago.Now --lets get down to the major adjustment that can be used to cure most bad flight problems. Fortunately every variable does not need adjusting --just a few --so lets go --------------open the Aircraft.cfg file with Notepad or any text program---(1) The first one you should encounter in any Aircraft.cfg file should normally be the [pitot static]. Set this variable to 10 if it is not already there. This will allow your VSI to more quickly and smoothly line out when you are on autopilot. If your file does not contain this variable then copy and paste it from one that does.(2) Next to check out is the [weight and balance] section. Since you are going to most likely make changes in the stability values then go ahead and change the empty weight pitch, roll and yaw MOI values. Increase them approximately 25%. You can always come back and increase them more if necessary. I have seen some that needed as much as double the default value.If you change the pitch, roll or yaw stability values then in some AC you will get severe shaking on the screen during flight at certain high speeds. This shaking can be stopped completely by increasing the MOI values. If you are shaking in the pitch direction then the pitch MOI needs increasing --same for roll and yaw. But to make it simple just go ahead and increase them all to start with.(3) Next we will look at the [flight tuning] section. To start with I recommend you set the following --pitch stability = 4.0roll stability = 2.0yaw stability = 4.0These are usually pretty good settings for most AC that are not flying smoothly. After a test flight if you still have problems with pitch, roll or yaw sensitivity you can come back and increase or decrease them. Most of my planes are set pretty close to what I have listed, but I have one at 8.0, 4.0 and 4.0. I have seen some that took a pitch value of 25.The Cruise lift scalar can sometines need changing also. If you still cannot get your AC to line out smoothly on the VSI --even with the pitot static value at 10--then raise the Cruise Lift Scalar value slightly. The problem will be that your plane does not have enough lift and it is always trying to fall out of the sky so the VSI has trouble lining out --- you will notice this mostly on automatic ILS landings. Most of the time this will not need adjusting, but I have several set at 1.5 or 2.0 and one at 4.0The parasite and induced drag scalars may also need adjusting. Test fly your plane and take it to top speed. Then cut back sharply to idle throttle and see if your AC looses speed. There is no such thing as perpetual motion. But I have seen some planes --mostly military jets--that come pretty close. The speed should fall at least at a moderate rate to start with and it should continue to fall all the way to the stall. If it does not then increase the parasite drag to 2 or 3. Test the AC again and notice the rate the speed falls --if it is to fast to suit you then cut the number down a little --adjust as necessary. Continue to test fly and adjust until you are satisfied. You will loose some of the planes top speed capability when you increase this number but we will discuss that in another section.You most likely will not have to adjust the induced drag value.The next thing is the elevator, aileron and rudder effectiveness values. I seldom have to adjust these. But when I do it is usually the elevator effectiveness value that needs tweaking. I determine that by checking how quickly the nose rotates on takeoff when I pull back on the stick. If the AC jerks up to quickly I lower the elevator effectiveness number and if it is to sluggish and trys to hug the ground I increase it. An increase to 2.0 is usually to much adjustmentThis sums up my recommendations in the [flight tuning] section --the most critical of all the sections in the file.(4) The [fuel]section --this is pretty much self explanatory --add or subtract as you wish. But if your AC uses fuel at an incredable rate you will want to slow down the rate or add more fuel. I usually slow down the rate. The tank loadings are listed as gallons.(5) The [flaps] section. The only variables in this section that I adjust are the lift scalar and the drag scalar. It is important to me that when I lower my flaps that I immediately start loosing some speed. Flaps will slow your plane down because of the inherent drag that they have. If they do not in the model you are working on then increase the drag scalar value. You may need to raise the value to 1.5 or 2.0 --test fly to see how much it needs. Also the lift scalar may need adjusting. I fully expect to see my planes nose pitch over some when I extend flaps. If that doesn't happen I increase the lift scalar. Again increase it to 1.5 or 2.0 and test fly. The lift scalar may be the only thing standing between you and falling out of the sky when you turn onto final. Some military jets are close to doing that in this sim.(6) Next is [jet_engine] --the thrust scalar will help you to regain any speed that you have lost when you increase the parasite drag value. It does not take a lot of increase to get your lost top speed back -- from 1.0 to 1.2 or at most 1.5 usually.But --and this is a big one ---- when you raise your top speed using this variable you will also raise your minimum speed. If your adjustment is to much you will rocket off the runway on takeoff. Speed adjustments are better made in the Airfile. But very few people know how to do that ---I am not one of them. So be carefull how much you increase or decrease this value --only slight amounts. You may have to live with a slight loss in top speed to maintain a good and reasonable overall speed profile.Sometimes I have to increase the parasite drag so much that I loose all reasonable speed and my speed profile is so out of whack that I cannot possibly get it right. When I encounter an AC like that I junk it.The [piston engine] power scalar is the same way.(7) Next is [generalenginedata]. Ths only thing here to check is the fuel_flow_scalar. If your AC uses an inordinate amount of fuel you can adjust it here. I usually add a fuel gauge in all of my AC that tells me the flow rate, unused fuel remaining, amount used, TTE (time to empty) and kts and mph. This gauge is very handy and is called -- CF722RKG_FuelStat!FuelStatusSq_Turbine--It can be found in Flightsim.com if you don't have it.( Next is the [autopilot] section. I always set the "autopilot_available=1. If it is set to zero then the AP will not work in your AC. I then set the default_vertical_speed equal to about 1500 feet for most AC. The Cessnas like the 172 I set at 700. I always set the autothrottle_available=1. If it is at zero you will not have an autothrottle in your plane. I set the autothrottle _arming_required=0. I do not like to have to mess around with arming the AT when I am flying --just my preference. if you want it on just set it to 1.The next thing in the [autopilot] section is the autothrottle_max_rpm. Usually this value is defaulted to 90 --or there abouts. I always change that to 110. What happens is that in most AC if the value is not set to about 110 you will notice that the autothrottle will not work well. Your speed will fall below the setting and not recover. Set this to 110 in all AC.That pretty much is the changes I make and why I make them. In most AC I go down the line and preset some of these variables before I ever fly the plane. But usually I do that with the pitot static, MOI values and stability values only. I test fly the plane before I fool around with any of the others.As I said --I have had to discard a few AC because they were so poorly modeled that I could not get a good response from them no matter what I did. But that has not happened a lot. The vast majority will fly well and respond to these adjustments.However I make it a rule to not download any AC from the various web sites that are not at least 4 mb in size --and the larger they are usually the better.I have skipped around in this tutorial. Many variables you do not have to change. But I have made note of the ones I think are important to change and important to understand why.May aircraft.cfg files do not contain all of the variables or sections that are available in others. When I find one like that I copy the missing sections from another one that has them.And of course remember to save any changes that you make.You can also lear something with this and also modify air file ...On Flightsim library
FS2004 (ACOF) - Misc.FS2004/FSX Air Ed[ Download | View ]Name: godaired.zip Size: 217,305 Date: 08-06-2009 Downloads: 2,447FS2004/FSX Air Ed. This is a good copy of AirEd by William M. Roth. The uploader noticed that other versions of this utility are missing things. Like in primary aerodynamics under lift, there should be 8 records, not 6. This upload is for anyone who is trying to tweak the flight dynamics of FS2004 or FSX aircraft and might have been having a problem. Uploaded by Bob Chicilo.FS2004 (ACOF) - Misc.FS2004 How To Tweak Flight Dynamics[ Download | View ]Name: howtweak.zip Size: 47,722 Date: 09-12-2005 Downloads: 1,910FS2004 How To Tweak Flight Dynamics. This pdf file is for people who want to learn, or learn more, about updating the flight dynamics of FS2004 aircraft. It won't tell you everything, but it will tell you some things the majority of flight simmers don't know about updating flight dynamics. By Bob Chicilo.
Also some different things nice to read ...http://www.sim-outhouse.com/sohforums/forumdisplay.php?83-FS-2004-Tweaks-and-TipsRegards.bye.gifGus.

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Hello, <snip>Regards.bye.gifGus.
Gus: once again you ride in on a rescue mission! There's plenty there to read which I will get on to.Thanks again for your help.

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