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Which Transition altitude do you use within EU ?

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I know that within US and Canada 18000 feet seems to be the common tr level.I have read that within EU there are many Transition levels depending on the country, the airport and so on.So, to get close to the reality meanwhile avoiding to micromanage each single flight, which Tr level do you use in EU ?

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Hi Mark,Best bet is always to check the appropriate airport charts. What I know for sure is that in Germany the TA is 5000 feet, while the TL depends on local QNH.Regards,Stefan

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here are some airports I fly to and from frequently:ltba 4000lgav 9000loww 5000eddf 5000eham 3000eddm 5000lfpg 4000egll 6000lszh 7000lirf 6000If you don't want to micromanage, 5000 / FL60 looks like a decent choice.Doruk Selcuk

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I guess you could pick something around 5,000 feet if you don't want to change from flight to flight. I just use what Radar Contact and Avilasoft EFB tells me the TA is, or if I got my hand on the charts it will tell me. With all the work I am doing in the FMS for preflight, going in an setting the TL/TA is not a big deal for each flight, in my opinion of course.

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If you don't want to micromanage, 5000 / FL60 looks like a decent choice.
5000 yes, FL60 no. Remember even 1013hPa (and below) will be FL70. QNH1014 and above will be FL60. ATIS will never give you TA/TL (in FSX, that is) so you'd have to figure those out yourselves. Would have to dig up the numbers for FL50 and FL80 however (quite rare anyways).sig.gifEDIT Alright I believe FL50 is from ~1050hPa (never seen this irl but may happen every once in a while... highest I remember was in the 1040s) and FL80 for QNH976 and below, equally rare I dare say, at least I've never had it. Just FYI.

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Something I've wonderd for a while but never managed to to find out is why the TA changes so dramatically from place to place. In the US it's 18000, in Australia its 10000 in Germany it's 5000. Anyone who knows, why is this so?

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Something I've wonderd for a while but never managed to to find out is why the TA changes so dramatically from place to place. In the US it's 18000, in Australia its 10000 in Germany it's 5000. Anyone who knows, why is this so?
Transition altitudeWhile use of a standardised pressure setting facilitates separation of aircraft from each other, it does not provide the aircraft's actual height above ground. At low altitudes the true height of an aircraft relative to an object on the ground needs to be known. The pressure setting to achieve this is called QNH or "altimeter setting" and is available from various sources, including air traffic control and the local METAR-issuing station.The transition altitude (TA) is the altitude above sea level at which aircraft change from the use of altitude to the use of flight levels. When operating at or below the TA, aircraft altimeters are usually set to show the altitude above sea level.[2] Above the TA, the aircraft altimeter pressure setting is normally adjusted to the standard pressure setting of 1013 hectopascals (millibars) or 29.92 inches of mercury and aircraft altitude will be expressed as a flight level.In the United States and Canada, the transition altitude is 18,000 ft. In Europe, the transition altitude varies and can be as low as 3,000 ft. There are discussions to standardise the transition altitude within the Eurocontrol area.[3]On November 25, 2004 the Civil Aviation Authority of New Zealand raised New Zealand's transition altitude from 11,000 feet to 13,000 feet and changing the transition level from FL130 to FL150.[4]The transition level is the lowest flight level above the transition altitude. The table on the right shows the transition level according to transition altitude and QNH. When descending below the transition level, the pilot starts to refer to altitude of the aircraft by setting the altimeter to the QNH for the region or airfield. Note that the transition level is, by definition, less than 500 ft above the transition altitude. Aircraft are not normally assigned to fly at the transition level as this does not guarantee separation from other traffic flying (on QNH) at the transition altitude; the lowest usable flight level is the transition level plus 500 ft.The transition layer is the airspace between the transition altitude and the transition level.In some countries, e.g., Norway, the transition level is determined including a buffer of minimum 1000 ft (depending on QNH) to the transition altitude. Therefore aircraft may be flying at both transition level and transition altitude, and still be vertically separated by at least 1000 ft. In those areas the transition layer will be a given vertical distance between 1000 ft and 1500 ft, depending on QNH.

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Thanks Steve, that information helped me get an understanding into a procedure I just blindly follow.

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Thanks Steve, that information helped me get an understanding into a procedure I just blindly follow.
Your welcome m8 i have to be honest though i did get that from Wiki. I'm not that clever it has tought me something too :)

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5000 yes, FL60 no. Remember even 1013hPa (and below) will be FL70. QNH1014 and above will be FL60. ATIS will never give you TA/TL (in FSX, that is) so you'd have to figure those out yourselves. Would have to dig up the numbers for FL50 and FL80 however (quite rare anyways).sig.gifEDIT Alright I believe FL50 is from ~1050hPa (never seen this irl but may happen every once in a while... highest I remember was in the 1040s) and FL80 for QNH976 and below, equally rare I dare say, at least I've never had it. Just FYI.
Actually in the uk this has changed, 1013 is now classed as being high. So 1013 will be separated from fl070 if ta is 6000ft.Recently in uk midlands tma changed to 6000ft so all london and midlands airfields now have a ta of 6000ft, Scottish all 6000 with Manchester being 5000ft.As a side note there are plans to harmonise the ta across the uk and Irish airspace to an even higher level, 10000,14000,18000 ft are all proposed levels.See here for some info http://www.caa.co.uk/application.aspx?catid=14&pagetype=65&appid=7&mode=detail&nid=1962One query on this however regarding the sim, if you set the ta to 6000ft and on your Sid you have a stop level of 6000ft, in the fmc it will show it as fl060, is this correct behaviour? Surely it should show 6000ft still?

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