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at 57 years, first flight!

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Way to go Barry! I will probably solo on Wednesday in a C172SP if the winds aren't to high or crosswind. I am also 57+.What I want is some airconditioning since I am sweating bullets here in 90degree weather in Orlando, FL.No 'roos on the airport but a large eagle was soaring over the departure runway this morning during touch n goes.W. Sieffert

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Way to go, both of you. The more you listen to the comm, the easier it gets.Good luck and keep it up!!!

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That is awesome! Congratulations! Hope I get the chance (and the nerve) to try it someday.KP

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Glad to hear there are more of us "old guys" around here. I also am 57 and in another life even used to jump out of perfectly good aircraft for the fun of it. I haven't flown as PIC in about 20 years but it's like riding a bike.Steve

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Maybe thats my problem, I haven't been pedalling fast enough!W. Sieffert:D

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Sieffert and everyone else who will solo on Wednesday:In 42 minutes, today's the day - Good luck on the solo!!!Once you have done it you will know what all the other solo pilots know and it is something that they cannot described. It has to have been done to understand.Have a good two touches and a stop.:-jumpy

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Hi Barry,Congratulations !I bet you're *really* hooked now !Have you started planning on buying your own plane ? .The Gazelle looks like a very nice plane. Sort of a "trimmed down" Cessna 172.I was a "young pup", at 45, when I did my ppl two years ago .>was taken by surprise by the amount of turbulence we>encountered in the first 1000'. Nothing like FS2002!!Turbuulence as you may or may not know, is going to vary according to weather conditions / airport location. It's usually the worst down low, and in the summer during the day. You'd also feel it more in a Gazelle, with a wingloading of only about 9-10 lb/ft^2, than in a heavier plane.Was the air still bumpy at 2000' ? When you fly in smooth air, you will be amazed at how, .. well "smooth" it really is ! . Flying at night the air tends to be very smooth. It can be almost an eerie experience as the plane just "glides" along.On the other hand, I'm sure the Gazelle is lighter on the controls and more responsive, i.e. more fun to fly than a 172 or piper. They will feel more like a "truck" than a plane. I'm in Ont/Canada, and did my ppl in 172's. I'd love to get some flight time in U.L's. There are not very many places that rent them around here, or even where dual instrction can be had.>The pilot told me to turn to various directions and I was>amazed at how easily the aircraft turned to a standard rate>turn as indicated on the panel -- seemed a lot easier and>quicker that in any Sim aircraft that I had flown.Well that's probably partly due to it being an "u.l.". Also you obviously have a different sight picture than with just a tiny monitor. It's amazing how similar a sim is though, isn't it ?>he "supervised" my final approach and landing.Wow!, that's great. Did you fly it right down to the flare and touchdown ?>I would like to do some more or this -- don't know about the>ultralight though - would like to repeat the experience in a>Cessna/Piper. I have a feeling though that the Comms would>beat me -- can't hear/understand most of what went through the>headphones . And practicing with FS2002 isn't the answer - I>have that off pat !! Real life is much harder!! :)What didn't you like about the u.l? The turbulence? You *will* feel that same turb, even in a larger aircraft when you're down low. Again that will vary with the weather. On a summer day, when cu's are building all over the place, it will be turb until you get higher up. Then you will be amazed at how smooth it is.You'll have to take a flight in a piper/cessna yourself to see the difference, but I think that you'll find it's not much different. The airplane will feel slightly "heavier" on the conrtrols, and the plane will not react quite as quickly to control inputs. Aside from that, it will be very similar.Comms, you will get used to. There are a number of sites on the internet where you can listen to real time ATC. The more that you do that, the easier it will become.Mike

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I took what is described as "an introductory trial flight" today - in a larger style ultralight ,a Skyfox Gazelle . The flight was from a grass strip at Caboolture - north of Brisbane. Our campervan club was camped there for the weekend. My first reservations started when I saw how many kangaroos there were on the airstrip.It was excillerating - but for me also quite frightening. I told the pilot that I was an enthusiastic simmer and he asked me if I used pedals - I said no. He taxied out to the strip - gunned the power - and told me to fly it. I took off OK but was taken by surprise by the amount of turbulence we encountered in the first 1000'. Nothing like FS2002!! I was basically starting to panic a little -- but kept it under control as I knew that the pilot was there and watching my every move!. I have heard that Sim pilots do the wrong thing by concentrating on the panel -- but not me!! In my panic to stop this thing from falling out of the sky, I had no time at all to look at the panel and put all my concentration on keeping the wings straight and level looking out the front window. In fact, I dare not look anywhere else other than straight out the front. But as we levelled out around 2000' I started to relax a little and started to scan the instruments -- still no time to admire the scenery though. The pilot told me to turn to various directions and I was amazed at how easily the aircraft turned to a standard rate turn as indicated on the panel -- seemed a lot easier and quicker that in any Sim aircraft that I had flown. We flew back to the airfield and did a circuit - all under my control . The pilot controlled the power while we did an approach and he "supervised" my final approach and landing. I must admit to being a little legless upon getting out of the a/c -- but also very excited. I couldn't really express my pride in what I had done to my friends who were waiting for me. I would like to do some more or this -- don't know about the ultralight though - would like to repeat the experience in a Cessna/Piper. I have a feeling though that the Comms would beat me -- can't hear/understand most of what went through the headphones . And practicing with FS2002 isn't the answer - I have that off pat !! Real life is much harder!! :)Barry

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This may be a little late, but congratulations from me too, Barry. Flying up there is extremely exhilarating. (Did I spell that correctly? :-hmmm ) I was watching some reruns on TV just last night (Saturday 8/9/03) -- an old episode of "The Andy Griffith Show". For those of you not familiar with the premise, "Andy Taylor" was the sheriff of a fictional small USA town called "Mayberry." He lived with his son "Opie" and his middle aged "Aunt Bea."Well, Aunt Bea decided she wanted a "moment of glory" all her own. Something she did that no one else she knew had done. She decided to take flying lessons and solo. It was great fun watching her metamorph from a nervous newbie to confident student pilot. The camera recorded all her landings -- from the two to three bounce and stop at the end of the runway down to proper flare outs and touchdowns. Of course she passed her solo with "flying colors"! It was enjoyable especially because Aunt Bea was not a young person; was extremely nervous and scared to death in the beginning, but persevered anyway and accomplished something many people talk about wanting to do with most never trying. Good job, Barry. :-jumpy-Lindy :-wave

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Congratulations Barry.you wait till you've just made your first solo- then you'll know why they say that flying is the best thing they've invented other than sex!Good luck mateDave

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>that flying is the best thing they've invented other than sex!Other than? .Mike

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