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Airborne_guy

Piper Archer ll

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Hello everyone, I just bought the Piper Archer ll for FSX because I am about to begin real life flight lessons on it. Are there any coldstart, navigation, tutorials guides out there for this plane?

 

Thanks

 

 

 

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Hello everyone, I just bought the Piper Archer ll for FSX because I am about to begin real life flight lessons on it. Are there any coldstart, navigation, tutorials guides out there for this plane?

 

Thanks

I would recommend talking to your flight instructor before using FSX with your flight training.  Some instructors feel that bad habits that are hard to break (expensive) can be easily picked up in Flight Sim.  Make a plan with your instructor on how best to use the flight sim with your training.  If I were your instructor, I would recommend using flightsim only for checklist and procedures memorization.  

 

Carenados, especially their earlier releases like the Archer, aren't known for their flight dynamics modelling or system depth.  The Archer wasn't a bad platform for brushing up on basic IFR flying, at least until A2A released their 172 and Cherokee.  I would highly recommend the A2A Cherokee 180.  It has excellent flight modelling, very deep with the systems.  The Cherokee's checklist is basically the same as the Archer's, only some slight differences in switch and trim locations, but it is a far more in depth simulation. 

 

Again tho, check with your instructor first if you plan on using FS with your flying lessons.

 

Cheers

TJ

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When I did my PPL/CPL training I found using FSX was good for Navs providing you've got some realistic ground scenery. Outside of that, and perhaps runing through some checklists - the feel of the aircraft will be completely different.

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Try not to fixate too much on the instruments, PPL training is meant to be a very visual experience. For example, how many people flying FSX, do a visual clearing check to the left or the right, before turning (no - me neither)..When I did my PPL we were supposed to do a little weave every 500ft during climbing and descent to check all clear ahead, and visual checks of the wing tips relative to the horizon to make sure we were straight and level, not spend too much time with the head in the cockpit.

The biggest problem with FSX I reckon, is the unrealistic feel to the trimmer. Trimming is absolute essential for accurate flight - it's actually a lot easier in a real aircraft than the sim, but FSX doesn't teach it well. 

I would concentrate on check lists and cockpit familiarisation. Knowing what all the kit in the cockpit does, and how to operate it will hold you in good stead. Read up on altimetry - learn about QFE/QNH Standard pressure - and see the effects in action in the sim, all useful stuff.

My 2 cents

Eugene

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This thing didnt even come with a manual or a checklist, will not be purchasing from them again!

It is like buying bare computer parts for your computer...they should mark their products as "bare OEM". Nothing comes with it --- you get a plane in a plain brown wrapper (or should I say anti-static bag). Pardon the sarcasm...it is just the way it is most of the time with Carenado.

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I hope that I don't come over the wrong way when I say that, rather than worrying about apparent missing manuals (I have not purchased the Archer, so I take your word for it), that you use the materials, i.e. checklists, flight parameters etc, that you will be given when you start your training.

 

I am currently flying the Warrior III for real at the moment and generally use my checklists for the A2A Cherokee since it much the same procedure and helps me to memorise my checklists.

 

As for you navigation, I would, to some extent, avoid any FSX-based (or similar) tutorials and use the advice/teachings of your instructor(s) and the study books that you will undoubtedly purchase for your course. As Eugene and TJ mentioned, bad habits can be picked up that can either be down-right wrong or sometimes dangerous in real-life practice. Again, on the same note as above, in the sim one tends to keep their heads in the cockpit since there is no real need for traffic deconfliction or "seat of your pants" feel for the aircraft, when turning for example. When you jump into the real thing you will have your eyes out of the cockpit "like a s***house rat" as my instructor likes to bluntly put it, so try to get some practice flying with the horizon and keeping your head away from the dials except for regular sweeping checks (you'll learn all this in due course).

 

Flying for real was the single best decision I have made so far in life; I wish you all the best, it'll be a blast! B)

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