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rhodges

Safest Airlines here and in the whole world.

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Hi all, I ran across these airline statistics that I found very interesting. I simply thought I'd share them with you. Enjoy the read. StanSafest AirlinesUnited States and CanadaRankings Airlines Average Accident Rate 1 South West 0.00 2 America West 0.00 3 Delta Airlines 0.23 4 North West 0.35 5 Continental Airlines 0.40 6 United Airlines 0.43 7 US Air 0.45 8 Air Canada 0.48 9 Aloha Airlines 0.49 10 American Airlines 0.53 Sources: AirDisaster.com, AirSafe.com, Boeing, FAA. Statistics valid through December 31, 2000United States and Canada are classified under the First World category. From the table above, the accident rates for all the 10 Airlines are below 1.0, indicating that they have a very safe record.Caribbean & Latin/South America RegionsRankings Airlines Accident Rate 1 Mexicana Airlines 0.53 2 Aerolineas Argentinas 1.20 3 Varig 1.22 4 Aeromexico 1.85 5 Transbrazil 2.35 6 Avianca 3.15 7 VASP 3.24 8 LAN Chile 4.00 9 Aero Peru 16.7 10 Cubana 24.0 Sources: AirDisaster.com, Boeing, FAA. Statistics valid through December 31, 2000In the Caribbean & Latin/South American Regions, the disparity between the safest and the least safe is quite marked. The first five rankings seem reasonable even though they are classified under the Developing World category.Europe Rankings Airlines Average Accident Rate 1 BA 0.270 2 Lufthansa 0.300 3 SAS 0.595 4 British Midlands 0.680 5 Braathens SAFE 0.695 6 Alitalia 0.750 7 Iberia 0.845 8 Air France 0.870 9 KLM 1.030 10 TAP Portugal 1.060 Sources: AirDisaster.com, AirSafe.com, Boeing, FAA. Statistics valid through December 31, 2000European Airlines all come under the First World category and their records indicate their better safety standards. Africa and Middle EastRankings Airlines Accident Rate 1 South African 0.63 2 Saudi Airlines 1.40 3 Royal Air Moroc 1.54 4 Kenyan Airways 3.00 5 Air Afrique 3.33 6 Ethopian 4.00 7 Nigerian Airways 5.00 8 Egypt Air 8.00 9 Royal Jordanian 8.82 10 Air Zimbabwe 12.50 Sources: AirDisaster.com, Boeing, FAA. Statistics valid through December 31, 2000In Africa and the Middle East, only South Africa has been grouped under the First World category. Its record is fairly impressive when compared to the other African/Middle East countries.Australia and AsiaRankings Airlines Accident Rate 1 Qantas 0.00 2 All Nippon Airways 0.22 3 Air New Zealand 0.74 4 Cathay Pacific Airways 0.97 5 Malaysia Airlines 1.11 6 Thai International 1.90 7 Singapore/Silk Air 2.00 8 Japan Airlines 2.05 9 Garuda Airlines 4.08 10 Philippines Airlines 4.68 Sources: AirDisaster.com, Boeing, FAA. Statistics valid through December 31, 2000Qantas is one of the safest airlines in the world with a record of zero fatalities in its many years of operation. However, one of its Boeing 747 was involved in an accident during a landing in Bangkok. Although there were no fatalities, the damage to the airplane was quite extensive. Instead of writing off the hull that would be cheaper, it appears that Qantas decided to repair the airplane to maintain a zero hull loss record!According to the table, All Nippon Airways has an even better record than most of the American or European best Airlines.

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Interesting, thanks for sharing.

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I seem to remember an SWA 737-300 overrunning the runway on landing at KBUR a few years ago and almost impacting a gas station across the street - could have been really bad. Is this survey only taking into account accidents which caused fatilities?

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Qantas is also the second oldest airline in the world.

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Hehehe, anyone wanna fly Cubana?

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They're among the safest in the world but saying so would not be politically correct...

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Interesting info there. What that doesn't seem to take into account is how many flights or how many miles are flown.For instance, if I have an airline that flies from my local airport to a tourist island 30 miles away, twice a day and never has an accident, I have an accident rate of 0.As compared to, say, Delta, who has hundreds, if not thousands of flights, a day, and has one accident. While they look like they have a worse record, but in reality they don't. Or, at least, that's how I understand it.

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imoore,I think your interpretation is correct. The data posted here look very much like data I once saw published where the number represented the number of crashes or the number of fatal crashes (don't recall which) per 1 million takeoffs. Most U.S. carriers in the data I saw were at 0.5, or one crash per 2 million flights. So it is true that Southwest's 0 prior to the year 2000 may not be truly indicative of extraordinary safety, while Delta's 0.23 certainly is (I remember specifically noting from the data I saw that Delta had an exceptional number, because I fly Delta a lot).The data I saw also segregated accident rates by aircraft type. I don't recall seeing any one type of aircraft that was exceptionally safe compared to its competitors, but I do recall that the Concorde had the worst numbers of all, with its single crash in Paris, divided by only about what was it...50,000 or 70,000 flights or so?

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Actually, El Al's rate is very high. They have very few flights compared to major carriers, but have had two "fatal events". Both, additionally, were maintainance related. In 1977 pressurization failed on a flght over Yugoslavia, and a passenger was killed, and then more famously in 1992 an engine fell off a cargo flight taking off from Amsterdam. The pilot tried to turn back but couldn't make it, and crashed into an apartment building, killing the flight crew and 48 people on the ground. Two incidents and over 50 dead in less than a million flights, compared with, for example, no incidents and no deaths in 12 million flights for SouthWest makes for a high incidence rate.Richard

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The same argument can be made for the 0.3 for Lufthansa which has a huge number of flights and a great many of them are extremely long range.

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We should have a contest to see who can fly Cubana the most without any incidents.

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Hmm, seems to me the europe bit is missing some of the low cost airlines, I know EasyJet and Ryanair have a very, very good, if not impecable safty recordDan.

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Despite the two fatal accidents that have occured to Saudi Arabian Airlines (SV), from my personal knowledge of operations and maintenance at SV, SV is actually just as safe as South African Airlines. While the August 19th 1980 L1011 Tristar accident in Riyadh was attributed mostly to pilot error, the November 12th 1996 747-100B mid-air collision disaster near New Delhi wasn't SV's fault, since the Captain of the 747 was following procedures accurately and was following ATC instructions precisely: it was the flight crew of the Kazakhstan Airlines IL-76 who descended from their assigned altitude of 15,000 feet to 14,000 feet, the same altitude at which the SV 747 was flying at in the opposite direction. The only blame which can be pointed at SV in the 747/IL-76 mid-air collision disaster is that SV didn't have any TCAS gauges installed on their 747-100B's, and thus after this accident all of SV's aircraft were fitted with TCAS gauges in their cockpits. It's worth noting that neither the IL-76 had a TCAS gauge installed in its cockpit. In short, SV was innocent in the 1996 mid-air collision disaster.Other than a small number of non-fatal minor incidents, Saudi Arabian Airlines can be considered one of the safest airlines in the Middle East/Africa region, and thus it has the same safety standard as South African Airlines and Emirates. This isn't only because of the excellent maintenance that SV has, but it's also because of SV's high standard flight training system and their highly professional flight crew.Cheers,

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A cousin of mine left British Airways some years ago for a more senior flight attendant job with Saudi Airlines. She'd only been with them a week or two, and was working the first class cabin on a flight from Heathrow.She reached across to pour a glass of water for the passenger in the window seat, and the passenger in the aisle seat slid his hand straight up inside her skirt and groped her. She dumped the contents of the water jug she was holding into his lap, and went and told the purser what had happened. He told her that that was something one just had to put up with for the considerably higher pay that Saudi Airlines gives it's ex-pat cabin staff.On arrival at Jeddah, she was surprised to be hustled by a manager straight onto a flight for Paris. She was told that the guy she'd been groped by was a member of the extended Saudi royal family, and he wanted her charged with assault. The manager was putting her on the first plane out of the country without any paperwork to get her out of his reach. By the time the flight got to Paris, she'd already been fired. She had to pay her own way from Paris to London, and never received a paycheck from Saudi Airlines even for the orientation week and couple of flights she'd worked prior to the incident.Two years later, I was on a flight home to London after working in Ras Tanura, and shortly before take-off I was bumped from my seat in business class back to coach, because another princeling had decided to fly at the last minute, and wanted his staff to sit in business class. When I complained to customer service in London they actually tried to make an additional charge on my credit card. They said they were going to refund me half of my advance purchase round trip business class ticket, and charge me a full fare no advance purchase one-way coach (or "Guest class") ticket instead, which was actually MORE than half the apex business class ticket. They actually wanted me to PAY over a hundred pounds for the privilege of being bumped from Business class to coach class. Sorry, but I wouldn't set foot on a Saudi Airlines flight again if *they* paid *me*Richard

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Probably just not up to the number of flights to generate a meaningfull number yet. Richard

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Hi Richard,Sorry to know about you & your cousin's bad experiences with Saudi Airlines, I guess it pretty much reflects how some (not all) of the Saudi princes think very rudely and selfishly without respect for others, and also how the management in Saudi Airlines isn't really good to say the least. While the flight crews of Saudi Airlines are very professional and the maintenance in the airline is very efficient, the airline's management and its way of handling Saudi princes is quite awful, and this isn't something that only foreigners are complaining about. Countless numbers of employees from the airline and Saudi nationals have complained about the very same issues that you've pointed out in Saudi Airlines, but what can we do? For what it's worth, Saudi Airlines isn't a perfect airline, and those issues demonstrate that quite clearly. Maybe with more pressure from employess from the airline and Saudi nationals, the management of the airline will get better and I certainly hope so.Cheers,

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Pre - Flight breifing to the passengers on Cubana - "Welcome to Cubana flight XXX to XXX. Look under you seats, and you'll see a parachute, firmly affix it to you torso just like a backpack. Now to you left you will see a mask, attach it to you face using the straps on the side. Next fasten you seat belts, first you latch the waist belt, then its the shoulder harnesses, finally the leg and arm restraints. In the event of a mid-air breakup, those who aren't sucked out should make for the gaping hole in the airplane, jump out, pull the bright orange ripcord, and hope it works. Should we land in the water, you seat cushions can be used to keep you alfloat. The pouch on the left strap of the parachute contains a sirvival kit, you'll need that due to the fact that we can't afford up-to-date ELTs. If you happen to make it to you destination without incident, the seat arm contains a "Congradulations" card, feel free to take it. Thank you for flying Cubana, and good luck!" :-hah

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