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Flappy

Course on charts?

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Hi there flightsim folks,

 

Where can I find the course of the airport and the vor's? Because I'm learning the B738 and I am not able to find the course.

 

http://www.ais-netherlands.nl/aim/2015-12-24-AIRAC/eAIP/html/graphics/eAIP/EH-AD-2.EHAM-SID-18L.pdf

Can someone help me with this example of finding the course? I am setting up a flight from EHAM 18L with a VALKO 3E departure.

 

And yeah, I am a noob :D

 

Thanks in regard,

Flappy

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Where can I find the course of the airport and the vor's? Because I'm learning the B738 and I am not able to find the course.

To find the course of the rwys etc you need to open up one of the charts for the rwy you want

 

In your example you would take off from rwy 18L being 184 course once taken off than you would turn to 163 as per the chart and follow the departure as shown in the chart

 

 

Capture.png

 

 

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That's the SID chart, so the course isn't so important as you'll fly it in LNAV in the NG. A conscientious crew would tune the VORs as a backup and put the outbound course in, but there's really not much need to do this at your stage of learning. It's a lot of button twirling that's probably a distraction more than anything else. You'd simply fly the whole thing with LNAV guidance.

 

The landing does however need the correct inbound course for the arrival runway. This can be found on the approach chart. Also note that the iap charts like that aren't the clearest and are often missing important info. I'd heartily recommend the Navigraph chart subscription which contains the very easy to understand LIDO charts.

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To find the course of the rwys etc you need to open up one of the charts for the rwy you want

 

In your example you would take off from rwy 18L being 184 course once taken off than you would turn to 163 as per the chart and follow the departure as shown in the chart

 

 

Capture.png

 

 

 So to get this right: the course is then the same as the runway heading? If I get you right.

Airlinesim,

Yeah I know that the course for departing isn't that important, but I that kind of person that wants everything set the right way. :P

 

 

Thank you both for your quick and discrete answers <3

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Course and Heading are two different things - course is your track over the ground - heading is which way your nose is pointed... For example - if you re flying 000 or North - with zero wind - your heading and course will be the same... Add a wind from the west and you may have to point the nose of the plane at 350 heading to maintain your 000 course...

 

Regards,

Scott

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I get what you mean.

But I mean that if you set the runway heading at startup/taxi to (in this case) 183.

Is the course then  the same or am I now being a stupid guy?

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Hi Flappy,

 

I'm not sure I understand what you're asking. Yes - you should dial in the CDI for the runway heading - before takeoff - and triple check that the runway numbers and runway heading jive with what you expect... Airliners have crashed because the crew didn't check - lined up in a runway that was too short and attempted a takeoff... Is that what you're asking ?

 

Regards,

Scott

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 So to get this right: the course is then the same as the runway heading? If I get you right.

Airlinesim,

Yeah I know that the course for departing isn't that important, but I that kind of person that wants everything set the right way. :P

 

 

Thank you both for your quick and discrete answers <3

 

With no wind, then yes, they're the same. Imagine the heading is the direction you're walking in down the road to the shops, in still wind your course is the same. If there's a huge wind from the side that is almost blowing you off your feet then you now won't be walking in a straight line. The line you're now walking is the course, in a rather simplistic description.

 

However, for departure it's really not important. Most SIDS are RNAV based these days, which essentially means that the aircraft tracks itself along the route. Flying a raw data SID (which is where you manually follow the VOR radials) is incredibly difficult to do single pilot in an aircraft the size of a NG and even most real world pilots who don't really do it (i.e. anyone not flying a 707!) would not enjoy it very much. You could fly this one raw data, by following the SID instructions from the chart. 

 

SID.png

 

 

So takeoff and at 500 feet turn LEFT to heading 163. At 6.5 miles from the SPL VOR (which you'd tune on the nav radio to show the distance) it's a RIGHT turn to intercept the 282 bearing (direction, or course) to the CH NDB (which you'd also have tuned). You'd quickly tune your nav radio to the RTM (Rotterdam) VOR and spin the course round to the 017 radial, upon crossing which you'd turn LEFT to intercept the 251 radial to the PAM VOR (which you'd have tuned shortly after tuning the RTM VOR on the other side). And fly, do the gear, flaps, level off at FL60 and make sure that you're at 2500 feet by the time you go past the CH NDB. 

 

Now you see why there's a LNAV button :)

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