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hawkhero

Should I reinstall P3D to C:P3D or keep it in default Program Files x86?

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I just got PMDG 737 and it suggest to install P3D to C: folder. Right now I have it installed in the default x86 folder. Is it worth it to reinstall P3D v3.1 to a C: folder?

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I have everything installed in the x 86 folder, and have never had a problem with the 737 NGX.

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The suggestion to install P3D in C: is a bit er... too simple: the idea is to not install P3D into the default x86 folder because this often will result in errors due to rights and ownership. If you know how to deal with things like that you might as well leave P3D where it is but I personally (and I think most simmers here [EDIT Bob not included  :wink: ]) choose to install P3D somewhere else. This could be in the root of C: but it also could be another disk and/or in another folder. I myself have C: dedicated to my OS and have P3D installed in the root of my D: drive. 

 

Since you already installed it you could try to make sure you've got full ownership/rights/access to the x86 folder. When in doubt or when you actually do get into trouble you might opt for a reinstall. (If you only have P3D itself installed I would definitely do that but if you also have (a lot of) add ons installed it might be a bit over the top to do that).

 

In the end it's all up to you but now you at least know why PMDG gave that (not too clear) suggestion.

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I just got P3D a few weeks ago. Not much installed with it so it would not be a big deal.

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The suggestion to install P3D in C: is a bit er... too simple: the idea is to not install P3D into the default x86 folder because this often will result in errors due to rights and ownership. If you know how to deal with things like that you might as well leave P3D where it is but I personally (and I think most simmers here [EDIT Bob not included  :wink: ]) choose to install P3D somewhere else. This could be in the root of C: but it also could be another disk and/or in another folder. I myself have C: dedicated to my OS and have P3D installed in the root of my D: drive. 

 

Since you already installed it you could try to make sure you've got full ownership/rights/access to the x86 folder. When in doubt or when you actually do get into trouble you might opt for a reinstall. (If you only have P3D itself installed I would definitely do that but if you also have (a lot of) add ons installed it might be a bit over the top to do that).

 

In the end it's all up to you but now you at least know why PMDG gave that (not too clear) suggestion.

 

It really isn't even close to rocket science to set permissions in windows so that no problems occur.  :wink:

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I agree with Bob.
 
Install into x86.
 
However we must add the Modify permission for the Users group on that folder:
 
Right-click, Properties, Security tab, Edit, select Users group, check Modify permission, Apply, OK.
 
The Modify permission allows addons to write back to files they store in the FS folder.


..The reason the idea of moving the FS installation to a new folder the User created, was to avoid the fact that the x86 folder does not provide the Modify permission to the Users group. Rather than move the folder, provide the missing Permission. It's the simple things that often escape our notice.

 

Since we become a member of the Users group when we log into Windows, we gain write access to files when we provide the Modify permission. We can issue these Permissions because we are all essentially Admins. However don't make the mistake of thinking Admins get god-like permission, they only get Privileges.


When we make a folder of our own, we are the owner, Users do not have permission. If we intend to install software into our own folder that needs write access to files there, they get that permission because we own it. Since no-one else has permission there, we should also add the Modify permission to the Users group on those folders too, to avoid problems in future.

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Steve, when I add "Modify" to the Users group and click on "Apply" I get a message that says: "  An error occurred while applying security information to:  C\Program Files (x86),  Access is denied".  When I click on Continue on that screen I get this:

"Unable to save permission changes on Program Files (x86).  Access is denied."

 

Can you please tell me what is causing that?

 

Well, I did just notice that Users (Jeff-PC/Users) applies to "Folder, Subfolders, and Files" while CREATOR OWNER only applies to "Subfolders and Files".  Could that be the reason for the above and, if so, is it OK to add "Folder" to the CREATOR OWNER category? 

 

Thanks,

Jeff

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Make sure nothing is running that has files open in it.

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Thanks for the quick reply, Steve.  I was just adding this when you sent your reply: 

 

Well, I did just notice that Users (Jeff-PC/Users) applies to "Folder, Subfolders, and Files" while CREATOR OWNER only applies to "Subfolders and Files".  Could that be the reason for the above and, if so, is it OK to add "Folder" to the CREATOR OWNER category?

 

BTW, nothing else was running.  I'm on Windows 7.

 

Thanks,

Jeff

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you went to:

C:\Program Files (x86)\Lockheed Martin\Prepar3D v3

and right-clicked, chose properties, security, Edit?

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Oops, I must've misinterpreted this in your first post: " Install into x86.
 
However we must add the Modify permission for the Users group on that folder:"

 

I was trying to do this on the "(x86)" folder, not the "Prepar3D v3" folder.  Sorry.

 

Jeff
 


P.S.  Steve, that worked.

 

Many thanks.

 

Jeff

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Good work Jeff, thanks for spotting it.

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