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mikebravo07

SAITEK yoke and pedals calibration for PMDG 737NG

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Hi, I have a Saitek yoke an pedals that I am using with the PMDG 737NG and FSX. I would like to know if someone knows to what sensitivity (to what % of full sensitivity) the different controls i.e. roll, pitch, yaw and brakes must be set to represent the actual behaviour of a real 737NG.

 

             Thanks.

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Welcome to the forum, please note PMDG requires full names on every posts.

 

The important settings are discussed in the Introduction under Realism Settings.  As far as controller calibration, just make sure than 100% full deflection of the control is 100% deflection of the controlled item and center is center. Best to use linear response curves, unless you have your own preferences. Null zones are only important for brake axis and then only to prevent cancelling autobraking when you use the pedals to maintain centerline on landing.

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Hi again, sorry my full name is Marcel Baribeau. Yes, I am aware of the Realism Settings pages that you mention. However, it does not cover the aspect of the simulation I have a problem with. I guess, it would more fall under the section ''Calibration'' which I have not found in the PMDG 737NGX Instruction and use manual. Is there such a section somewhere.

 

Marcel Baribeau

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''Calibration''

 

As I said, there is no magic "calibration."  Set up such that full scale is full deflection and center is center.

Perhaps you are having a problem that you are trying to solve, please describe your problem.

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Hi, thanks for your patience. What I am really after is when your flying and you select (click) OPTIONS in the upper left hand corner of the screen, then SETTINGS, then CONTROL, then CALIBRATION  and then, in SENSITIVITY AND NULZONE, for the yoke, you can select a sensitivity and nul zone for the Aileron Axis, the Elevator Axis and the engines control. Specially for the Aileron and the Elevator, selecting a sensitivity, as I understand it, allows us to fly the aircraft with the responsiveness of a F-18 Hornet or the the heaviness of an Airbus A-380. And this is why I would like to know what sensitivity I should select to have my PMDG Boeing 737-800NG fly like a real life Boeing 737-800NG.

 

Thanks again

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Full names on all posts please.

 

Your understanding of control calibration sensitivity is not quite correct. Sensitivity calibration is to ensure that full span is correct, or that when the controller is at the 100% position the controlled recognizes 100%.  Less sensitivity means that when the controller is at 100% the controlled recognizes less than 100%, or more sensitivity a controller position of less than 100% equals 100% to the controlled.  Of course center-span and null zones as well as linearity also come to play in calibration but are not part of this discussion.

 

The responsiveness of the controls is totally different from controller calibration, and is determined by the aircraft model. For example roll rate, in a fighter a full aileron deflection may yield a roll rate of 90-deg/sec but in an airliner will be be 3-deg/sec. The controller deflection is the same in both cases but the aircraft model in the simulator is the difference.  Some aircraft models have more fidelity than others, the PMDG model has been tested by pilots rated in the NGX with lots of time and you can be assured that if you set the simulator Realism setting to full-Realistic as recommended by the Introduction document your NGX is going to behave realistically.

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According to the A2A developers, full left (zero) null zone slider and full right (100%) sensitivity in the flight sim menus for all controller axis. - David Lee

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