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flesland

new PC after 7 years.

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Hey fiends again, of AVSIM forums, I'm considering the possibility for getting a brand new PC, I'm really tired of watching while FSX or P3D run with many lack of graphic continuity, bad refresh of graphics, etc so I'm decided to get a new one.

 

My budget available is US$ 3.000 and specs are:

 

- Intel CPU Core I7 4790K 4.0 GHZ.

 

- MOBO Asus Intel LGA1150 Z97-K.

 

- Graphic card Asus GTX 980 4096MB.

 

G Skill DDR3 16GB(2x8GB) 2133 mhz PC3-17000 Ares

 

- Corsair Watercooling Hydro Series H75 Performance

 

 and some others pieces that I'm still looking after. Please give me an advice for other pieces to consider and suggestions for anything else!!!

 

another question related mother board specs, I can see the supported memory modules and alsocan observe that there are native memory speeds for this mobo (1600/1333 MHz Non-ECC, Un-buffered Memory )*

 

and also overclocked speeds, (3200(O.C.)/3100(O.C.)/3000(O.C.)/2933(O.C.)/2800(O.C.)/2666(O.C.)/2600(O.C.)/2400(O.C.)/2250(O.C.)/2200(O.C.)/2133(O.C.)/2000(O.C.)/1866(O.C.) about it, how can I overclock a memory module so it can run at speeds describe previously??.

 

for example if I get this memory modules:G Skill DDR3 16GB(2x8GB) 2133 mhz PC3-17000 Ares. What will be the overspeed limit for each module?.

 

my current PC is an Intel i5 2.6 overclocked to 3.6GZ

MSI mother board P55-GD85

KIngston 16GB RAM

 

and this PC got it's limits I think because being applying all tweaks depicted in internet and youtube I can´t get more !!!

 

thanks in advance for any remark, suggestion, etc. etc.

 

:wink:

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My budget available is US$ 3.000 and specs are:

 

 

I say go Skylake!

 

http://www.avsim.com/topic/488494-new-build/

 

My components are listed in the 7th post down.

 

It's not just about performance, there are lots of other advantages Skylake brings to the table. M.2, U.2, USB 3.1, NFC... to name but a few.

 

 

- Corsair Watercooling Hydro Series H75 Performance

 

 

 

If overclocking, you can do better. For big tower cooler, NH-D15S [high comparability version of D15, D15 perfected] For AIO, Corsair H110.

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Thanks Martin-W, you mean is best to install a Noctua instead of water cooling system?, I thought that water cooling give better results for a overclocking system.

 

thanks again.

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The NHD15 is nearly as good as any water coling system and doent leak. Though most water sytems arnt so bad anymore.

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Thanks Martin-W, you mean is best to install a Noctua instead of water cooling system?, I thought that water cooling give better results for a overclocking system.

 

thanks again.

 

 

I didn't say that. In my post above I just mentioned the big tower air cooler I regard as the best, and the all in one, closed loop, water cooler I regard as the best. The choice is yours.

 

I would never tell anyone that they MUST go for big air instead of AIO. Closed loop water coolers are very popular, so that's a personnel decision you should make. 

 

However, if you'd like to know my thought process, in regard to why I went for the Noctua NH-D15S then I'ts as follows...

 

AIO water coolers are very popular and indeed, the industry seems to be pushing them these days, it's the latest thing. Most of the manufacturers seem to have jumped on the bandwagon. Water leaks is the first issue that spring to mind, but unfortunately AIO water cooler manufacturers don't provide us with any data in regard to how many units leak. Likewise we have no idea how many have failed or noisy pumps, air trapped in the system etc. However, I think it's safe to assume that these eventualities are reasonably rare, with most AIO coolers not having an issue.

 

However... you can't escape the fact that big tower heat sinks have no moving parts, no pump to fail, no pump to become noisy as it ages and absolutely zero chance of leaking fluid onto motherboards and graphics cards. So in essence, you don't have to worry about hassling the manufacturer to provide you with compensation for your damaged components and then waiting months for replacement parts.

 

Some will tell you of course that AIO coolers are way better in regard to thermal efficiency and that they beat air coolers every time. This is of course nonsense. For example, the NH-D15 is way up there with the best AIO coolers but much quieter than most. Yes, coolers like the Kraken X60 do indeed beat it, but they do so not just by having somewhat more surface area, but by installing super high RPM noisy fans. In other words, many of the AIO coolers cheat. 

 

There are one or two AIO coolers that are superior in terms of thermal performance of course, which was why I mentioned the Corsair H110. The H110 is almost as quiet as the NH-D15, and does cool your CPU somewhat better. But that's a nice segue into another important point...

 

Lets imagine you can overclock with your D15 to 4.7 GHz. But with your H110 AIO you can reach 4.8 GHz. Sounds great, but what does that 100 MHz bring to the table? Overclocking is linear in a well balanced system, so what does that extra 2% frequency increase provide? It's actually a mere 0.6 of as frame per second at 30 frames per second! Bugger all in other words.

 

So the question I would ask is whether the small chance of a noisy pump, failed pump or a leak, and consequently a damaged motherboard and graphics card, followed by extreme inconvenience, is worth it for a mere 0.6 of a frame per second.

 

Regardless of how rare such a scenario is, for me it isn't worth it.

 

Sorry to ramble on, by that's my thought process. Yours may be different, or you may spot errors in my judgement.

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Thanks Martin to share your experience with al of us, I'm very confused, I really don't know what choice take!!. but I'm going to take a decision soon!!, 

 

Thanks so much!!!

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With a $3000 budget, I say hold on for the GTX1080.  

 

Here is a near-exact copy of the system I built for myself a couple of months ago.  Even with the $699 GTX1080, you still have over $700 of headroom if you want to tune things up.  Owning that system, I can tell you, it will be as good as it gets.  The 1080 is what I'm getting as soon as it's out.

 

 
CPU: Intel Core i7-6700K 4.0GHz Quad-Core Processor  ($343.99 @ SuperBiiz) 
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i GTX 70.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler  ($107.99 @ Best Buy) 
Motherboard: Asus MAXIMUS VIII HERO ATX LGA1151 Motherboard  ($203.99 @ SuperBiiz) 
Storage: Samsung 950 PRO 256GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive  ($180.78 @ Newegg) 
Storage: Samsung 850 EVO-Series 1TB 2.5" Solid State Drive  ($322.75 @ OutletPC) 
Optical Drive: LG GH24NSC0 DVD/CD Writer  ($15.89 @ OutletPC) 
Total: $1584.35
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-05-15 22:03 EDT-0400

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The only changes I would make to Max's suggestions are...

 

I notice he has specified 32gb RAM. You only need 16gb, thus saving $67.99. I would then use that saving elsewhere. 

 

Max suggests the H100i AIO cooler. I would use the saving from the RAM to upgrade to a Corsair H110i. [if you decide on an AIO of course] If it fits in your chosen case of course.

 

Max suggest a Seasonic PSU. They are single rail. I prefer multi-rail. 

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Max suggest a Seasonic PSU. They are single rail. I prefer multi-rail. 

 

 

You make great points, and they're perfectly valid.  To me, there's no such thing as "too much RAM", but I'm doing much more than gaming on my system.  The H100i GTX/V2 (they're the same) was chosen for fitment concerns over the H110i, but having seen both I can recommend either easily.  

 

As for the single vs multi rail debate, it's been shown multiple times that it doesn't make any difference in 99% of the cases.  The important point is to get a very good quality PSU, and on that, 80+ Platinum PSUs made by EVGA, Corsair and Seasonic won't have any problems powering whatever you throw at them.  To me, multiplying rails is multiplying failure points, but there's a whole different school of thought on the issue.

 

I'd say personal preference.

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 To me, there's no such thing as "too much RAM", but I'm doing much more than gaming on my system. 

 

 

 

There is a context in which you can have too much RAM... in terms of a waste of money.   :smile:    But yes, if you do rendering or something that requires huge amounts of RAM, then yes it's justified.I doubt that applies to the OP though.

 

As for the single vs multi rail debate, it's been shown multiple times that it doesn't make any difference in 99% of the cases.

 

 

 

It doesn't make any difference in terms of performance no... but it does most definitely make a difference in terms of "safety". 

 

Restive load scenarios are rare of course, and it's rare that the short circuit protection fails, but it does happen, It happened to me with a Seasonic single rail PSU. And when that rare occurrence does manifest itself, you are way better off with a multi-rail PSU.

 

There's very little chance of damaging other components with a multi-rail, if the short circuit protection doesn't catch it. Conversely, in a single rail design, if the short circuit protection fails, you are "extremely" likely to find yourself with a damaged motherboard. 70 plus amps going where it shouldn't is no joke.

 

To me, multiplying rails is multiplying failure points,

 

 

 

it doesn't work like that. All modern PSU's are actually single rail PSU's. But what we refer to as multi-rail is simply a single rail split into sub rails with their own separate OCP. [Over Current Protection]

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I am actually getting ready to build a new PC after having my last build for 8 years.  Oddly enough, my last build was based on running FSX even though I do play other types of games.  Here is what I am considering for my new build with the latest prices listed at Newegg.com (including any rebate):

 

Case: Fractal Design Define R5 Blackout ($110)

Mobo: Gigabyte G1 Gaming 7 ($200)

CPU: Intel Core i7-6700K ($340)

GPU: EVGA 1080 GTX when released (est. $599)

Memory: G.Skill TridentZ 16GB (2x8GB) DDR4 3400/CL16 ($105)

or G.Skill TridentZ 16GB (2x8GB) DDR4 3200/CL14 ($105)

SSD: Samsung 950 Pro M.2 512GB for OS, Programs, and Games ($317)

PSU: EVGA SuperNova 750W Platinum ($130)

Blue-Ray Burner: Pioneer Black BDR-209DBK ($54)

Cooling: Noctua NH-D15 w/ 2 fans ($89)

 

A few comments about some of my choices:

 

1) Gigabyte G1 Gaming 7 Mobo: I was torn between Gigabyte Gaming 7 and ASUS ROG Hero motherboards, but the better on-board audio offered by the Gigabyte Gaming 7 help make my decision.  This will be my first time sticking to on-board audio so I want it to be as good as possible.  Any thoughts or suggestions on this?  I think, in the end, everything else on the boards are pretty much the same.

 

2) TridentZ 3400 vs. 3200 memory.  If buying the memory by itself, I would get the 3200/CL14 sticks.  However, Newegg is selling a i7-6700K/TridentZ 3400 CL16/Gigabyte Gaming 7 mobo combo deal for $580.  I was planning on getting all of these parts anyway, so this would save me $65 if I bought this combo compared to buying them separately.  I think giving up the 3200/CL14 memory for 3400/CL16 is probably worth $65.  Please let me know your opinions.

 

3) Air Cooling vs. Liquid Cooling: I see absolutely no need to mess with liquid cooling as CPUs are being made to run cooler and the NH-D15 performs very similar to most Liquid Coolers anyway.  It just isn't necessary unless you have more fun overclocking than you do playing games.  I guess I would say that if you need liquid cooling, then you need real liquid cooling with pumps, liquid reservoirs, and the custom tubes running throughout the PC.  The other stuff is gimmicky and loud in my opinion.  Why mess with it.  

 

Hope the prices help.  Any comments, good or bad, about my part choices are welcome.  Thanks.  

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1) Gigabyte G1 Gaming 7 Mobo: I was torn between Gigabyte Gaming 7 and ASUS ROG Hero motherboards, but the better on-board audio offered by the Gigabyte Gaming 7 help make my decision.  This will be my first time sticking to on-board audio so I want it to be as good as possible.  Any thoughts or suggestions on this?  I think, in the end, everything else on the boards are pretty much the same.

 

 

 

To be honest, Asus Crystal Sound 2 on-board audio is also excellent. have no experience of Gigabyte boards, but it seems a popular board. The other point id that the Asus UEFI is very good indeed, and you do get a nice software bundle. I went for the Asus Z170-A. Cheap and great features for the dosh.

 

 

2) TridentZ 3400 vs. 3200 memory.  If buying the memory by itself, I would get the 3200/CL14 sticks.  However, Newegg is selling a i7-6700K/TridentZ 3400 CL16/Gigabyte Gaming 7 mobo combo deal for $580.  I was planning on getting all of these parts anyway, so this would save me $65 if I bought this combo compared to buying them separately.  I think giving up the 3200/CL14 memory for 3400/CL16 is probably worth $65.  Please let me know your opinions.

 

 

 

I went for Ripjaw V 3200. Both the Trident Z and Ripjaw V were specifically designed with Skylake in mind. They use top quality Samsung modules. I agree with your choice 100%.

 

 

3) Air Cooling vs. Liquid Cooling: I see absolutely no need to mess with liquid cooling as CPUs are being made to run cooler and the NH-D15 performs very similar to most Liquid Coolers anyway.  It just isn't necessary unless you have more fun overclocking than you do playing games.  I guess I would say that if you need liquid cooling, then you need real liquid cooling with pumps, liquid reservoirs, and the custom tubes running throughout the PC.  The other stuff is gimmicky and loud in my opinion.  Why mess with it.  

 

 

 

The Corsair H110 is quiet, but apart from that I agree with you 100%. I went for the NH-D15S. In case you didn't know, the "S" variant is Noctua's latest design. It has much better RAM clearance, and there's more space between the cooler and the uppermost PCIe slot. 

 

It has only one fan, but that shouldn't put you off as two fans on the D14, D15 and D15S only make two degrees of difference. Pretty much nothing if you consider that two degrees is within the margin of error for thermal testing... and of course you can add a second fan if you prefer.

 

Due to the advantages it provides, I would encourage you to look at the 15S.

 

 

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