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Guest AndrewMcGregor

A sad day...

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"A plane owned by the Hendrick Motorsports organization crashed Sunday on its way to a NASCAR race, killing all 10 people aboard, federal officials said."Among those on the plane were ex-driver Ricky Hendrick and John Hendrick, the president and brother of owner Rick Hendrick. Here's what they know so far..."The Beech 200 took off from Concord, N.C., and crashed in the Bull Mountain area about seven miles west of the Martinsville airport about 12:30 p.m., said Arlene Murray, spokeswoman for the Federal Aviation Administration. The weather in the area was overcast at the time of the crash, according to Jan Jackson of the National Weather Service in Blacksburg.NTSB spokesman Keith Holloway said investigators were on their way to the crash site, which was in rough terrain, but could not begin their examination until Monday."I hope they can figure out what happened. My prayers go out to the family...

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Sad day indeed.WXKMTV 241620Z AUTO 00000KT 5SM OVC006 14/13 A2998 RMK AO1

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Chris,Yes, a sad day indeed. You are correct it was a 200, (at least from all the reports), and although I have never been to Blue Ridge, in firing up FS, I notice they have ILS and a backcourse ILS but NO glidescope, and if they were on the runway 12 approach, which I assume they were, there are tons of hills, small mountains and such which seem would be in the way if the weather was heavy with fog. (anyone who has actualy flown into there correct me if I am wrong, please).I did hear that Rusty Wallace stated that he has always felt this airport was well below what turboprops and biz-jets should be using and he was most uncomfortable flying into there in bad weather. Also, Roger Penske tried to get into there today with both his aircraft and helo, and it was a no/go on both accounts. I guess Roger's a pretty smart guy in aircraft too.As stated many times, by many pilots, weather can be either your best friend or worst enemy . . . in the real world, that is perhaps what kills most private pilots when it gets bad and they suddenly find themseves in over their heads. And, it comes on so quickly some times that you are in the soup before you can react.According to a spoksperson, there were 3 professional pilots aboard, PIC, #2 and Tony Stewarts Helo pilot. Certainly a bad day for NASCAR and aviation. I think one of the most important items any pilot can learn from this is to NEVER take weather for granted. I know when I have, it has almost bitten me a few times . . . and I'm sure it has done-in far better pilots than myself.Best to all, and condolences to the NASCAR family, as NASCAR has a large aviation culture of many driver/pilots and owners flying both themselves and crew and family to the events.Clay Dopke

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We concur with all that has been said here and wish the entire organization and Rick and family the very best in the very worst of times.As a fan of the Hendrick organization we can all be grateful for what they have all contributed to the racing community and again we pray the very best for all who have been touched by this tragedy.

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One report said they had already gone "missed approach" once and were doing the go around when they went down 7 miles west of the airport.:-(

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>backcourse ILS but NO glidescope, There is no such thing - backcourse ILS.If it is backcourse it is localizer only, so of course it is not ILS and has no glideslope.Michael J.WinXP-Home SP2,AMD64 3500+,Abit AV8,Radeon X800Pro,36GB Raptor,1GB PC3200,Audigy 2, Omega 2.7.90 (4xAA 16xAF)

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Ummmm!Don't think this is exactly the place for a debate or lesson on technicalities concerning verbalism.Those of us into it know what Clay means, and those who are not will not know what he is talking about anyway.My prayers and condolences to the families of those in the mishap.RTH 1585368CFI

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Michael,You are so correct, if it is backcourse there is NO glidescope. I stand corrected, but I intended to state localizer and typed ILS. Sometimes in trying to brief, we mis-state something. Thanks for correcting me, as I really DO know the difference. On another note, it has now been stated as also is indicated in another post that obviously the pilot called for a missed approach and shortly thereafter,that is when they went down. It is painfully obvious that if the weather had not been a factor, there would probably not been a missed approach or this incident. A real shame, and a event where all the wrong things happened at the wrong time.Aviation, even in it's professional state can be very dangerous when you mix in bad weather, human mistakes or mechanical failures. And as in many professions, on mistake can change several lifetimes.Again, thoughts and prayers go out to the familes . . . NASCAR has a multitude of driver/owner pilots who spend as much time in the air as they do at the tracks. Nature now of the beast.Best,Clay

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I think with winds like that they would be using Rwy 30. Missed approach on LOC RWY 30 calls for climbing right turn (over mountains) back to BALES at 2600ft which looks to give you 970ft of clearance over one particularly close mountain 5nm SE of the airport.A rather nasty looking approach really.Thoughts go out to Hendrick Motorsports.The RNAV 30 has a much friendlier left turn taking you out to a fix 16nm out.(There is no ILS)

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My thoughts go out to the the Hendrick Motorsports Family... I have Flown that part of the Blue Ridge many times before I was forced to quite flying and it is some of the roughest on the east coast... I haven't looked recently but at one time Roanoke runway ILS 33 which is just north of there had a DH of 1780'(My info is cold) which was the highest in the world... As a NASCAR fan the lose was to all NASCAR and all the fans...Ron Mashburn Retired CFII

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>>Roanoke runway ILS 33 which is just north of there had a DH of>1780'(My info is cold) which was the highest in the world...> As a NASCAR fan the lose was to all NASCAR and all theIn the world???????Doesn't sound right.Michael J.WinXP-Home SP2,AMD64 3500+,Abit AV8,Radeon X800Pro,36GB Raptor,1GB PC3200,Audigy 2, Omega 2.7.90 (4xAA 16xAF)

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A sad day indeed. My thoughts go to the families of all involved. I watched the race, and it was a horrible end to the race when they cancelled the post race ceremonies(rightly so). Maybe technology at the airport will continue forward. Tony

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May not sound right but in the 70's and early 80's that was common knowledge here. 1780 feet is a high DH on any ILS. I have been out of avaition for some time and some where there may be a higher one now but then that was the one... The problem is you were makeing a approach over the same mountains near where the recent crash on a ILS with little room for a desent on the ILS to the runway therefore leaving a very high decision height... I live only about 75 miles south of the mountian area...Ron Mashburn

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>>>>Roanoke runway ILS 33 which is just north of there had a DH>of>>1780'(My info is cold) which was the highest in the world...>> As a NASCAR fan the lose was to all NASCAR and all the>>In the world???????>Doesn't sound right.>>Michael J.>WinXP-Home SP2,AMD64 3500+,Abit AV8,Radeon X800Pro,36GB>Raptor,1GB PC3200,Audigy 2, Omega 2.7.90 (4xAA 16xAF)It isn't. NZQN has a DH of 3800' AGL. Mind you, no ILS there.

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The NTSB preliminary report finally came out on this accident. It sounds fairly obvious that the crew had lost situational awareness and was literally several miles behind the airplane. They did not start descending to MDA until after they crossed the MAP, then continued to descend for several miles beyond the airport. They were probably at least five miles from the airport when they declared a miss. They obviously were in uncharted territory as far as the missed approach procedure is concerned, since the procedure calls for an immediate right turn over the airport.What a tragic, needless accident.

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