Sign in to follow this  
michal

Don't tell me this is normal look

Recommended Posts

Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

I think that's just an artistic fish-eye type effect in the drawing...

Share this post


Link to post

>>Clearly this must represent max deflections of the wings of>the 787, and not how they would normally look in flight ...>>http://boeingmedia.com/images/one.cfm?imag...12578&release=t>>>Michael J.>WinXP-Home SP2,AMD64 3500+,Abit AV8,Radeon X800Pro,36GB>Raptor,1GB PC3200,Audigy 2>I would tend to think the wing flex in flight will be closer to the graphic than you think. One has to remember that the wings are going to be made of composites and will therefore flex more than what we're used to. Walt Gillette, vice president of engineering and manufacturing for the 787 program made this quote regarding wing flex of the 787:"The 787's wings will also be composite. Passengers seated next to the large windows on the 787 will notice those wings bent upward in flight more than they would be on the 777."One just has to look at competition gliders as well as other composite winged aircraft with higher aspect ratios to see that the flex will be more.Cheers,JohnBoeing 727/737 & Lockheed C-130/L-100 Mechanichttp://www.precisionmanuals.com/images/forum/ng_driver.jpg

Share this post


Link to post

G'day Michael,Nope; looks about right to me. Typical Boeing dihedral of about 7 degrees plus bending due to load factor.Cheers,Roger

Share this post


Link to post

If this represents a 'static' flex at high gross weight then how it is going to look when heavy turbulance is encountered? Are they going to point straight up :-hmmmMichael J.WinXP-Home SP2,AMD64 3500+,Abit AV8,Radeon X800Pro,36GB Raptor,1GB PC3200,Audigy 2http://www.precisionmanuals.com/images/forum/747400.jpg

Share this post


Link to post

>If this represents a 'static' flex at high gross weight then>how it is going to look when heavy turbulance is encountered?>Are they going to point straight up :-hmmm>>Michael J.>WinXP-Home SP2,AMD64 3500+,Abit AV8,Radeon X800Pro,36GB>Raptor,1GB PC3200,Audigy 2>http://www.precisionmanuals.com/images/forum/747400.jpgActually 'static' flex would be when on the ground. Under airload is known as 'dynamic' flex. A quick search on airliners.net for 777's with lots of wing flex reveals what Walt Gillette is reffering to.http://photos.airliners.net/middle/2/1/1/822112.jpghttp://photos.airliners.net/middle/3/6/4/820463.jpghttp://photos.airliners.net/middle/8/1/1/816118.jpghttp://photos.airliners.net/middle/6/5/9/815956.jpghttp://photos.airliners.net/middle/5/4/1/811145.jpgTaking the 777's wing flex into account then his words on the 787 flex would indicate that the BOEING artwork would be close to what you would see. As for turbulance, it would act much like any other large airliner since I'm sure Boeing can design wings for turbulance and span loading would be a large factor in keeping wing flex in check.Cheers,JohnBoeing 727/737 & Lockheed C-130/L-100 Mechanichttp://www.precisionmanuals.com/images/forum/ng_driver.jpg

Share this post


Link to post

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this