Sign in to follow this  
haldir

How on this planet do people manage...

Recommended Posts

Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

That is by far the coolest FSX video I have ever seen. That video was pure intertainment!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That Vecotrs film is one of my favorites. I saved it to my hard drive. You can get the high quality version over at FSW in wmv format.The other one is cool too, but where did they get AAA tracers from?? I don't have FSX installed yet, but this must be some add-on?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One way to achieve perfect frame rates is to run a "renderer". Computer animation basically comes in two stages: compositing and rendering. Compositing is where you create the images ("frames") in the order that you want them. A frame can take anywhere from a fraction of a second to several hours to composite. In effect, FSX acts something like a primitive real-time compositor. Once each frame is composited, it's saved to a gigantic hard drive. Then, all of the frames are rendered. The renderer takes each frame and fixes the exact lighting, textures, shaders, compression, and other technical goodies including edits, fades, and destructive editting (i.e. adjusting the field size and pacement to simulate pans, zooms, etc.). Once the renderer is done, you have a video.The big difference between a video and a sim is that the video runs precisely the same way every time you run it. That's how the frame rate can be so good: the compositing and the rendering is locked in. The sim allows for user input as the images progress, which means that each time it runs it can be different. The computer has to account for that, so your frame rates drop.I think it's important for users to be able to tell the difference between video and sim. I would suggest that some software developers count on a certain level of gullibility in their audiences when they present a video of their product using "actual in-game graphics". Sure, the graphics look like they came from the sim or the game, but the compositor was running at less than 30 frames per second to create the visuals. Since I am talking about stuff that goes somewhat oustide AVSIM's usual boundaries, I will now state that these opinions are mine only, and are not to be construed as any official opinion AVSIM may have on this topic, if any at all. Jeff ShylukSenior Staff Reviewer, Avsim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These were likely done using FRAPS, but running the sim's playback at a slower speed. When doing the editing, the speed can be easily be adjusted back to normal...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey guys, glad you liked the movies. :) Each of them took me between three weeks and a month to complete and required the help of many of my good friends as pilots and voice actors. Both were shot heavily in realtime multiplayer.To answer your questions, the smoke/fire/explosion effects in Lament I made entirely with the FSX SDK effects tool and object placer. Took me about a week just to set up that battle scene, and also required some *very* careful timing by the two pilots who flew the F-18 in the battle scenes.As for the framerates, the fps was locked to 25 in both videos. Keeping in mind issues like focal length and the scenery load in each scene it's not actually that difficult to hit that target consistently. Just have to be mindful of how much is going on in each shot. I also have a pretty much every tweak known to man in there, and a massive overlock on my core2. There's a little video smoothing going on during the final render of course, but the original clips are basically just as smooth.The previous poster is correct in his assessment of the difference between pre-rendered composited video and realtime game video. With a pre-rendered scene you have a lot of leeway. Unfortunately none of that helps me, all my stuff is realtime FSX and I don't use any post process effects other than a little colour correction. ;)In case anyone's curious, they were done on a core2 6600 (3.1 ghz), 2 gigs 667, nvidia 7900GTO 512mb pcie.Edit: Forgot one question, the playback speed. There was no time slowing or compression used in either. It's all in normal FSX time, though I have used that trick for timelapse stuff in other movies.Cheers,Mike (aka lotus)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, I knew you put a lot into the Vectors film because I saw it first on FSW, but to go and create the effects for FSX just to make a video! Crazy and way too time-consuming for me, LOLNo doubt you have a good skill making these vids though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jeff,I think the trick alot of us are using, not refering to the video in this post as explained below...is; if you use FSRecorder and set it to 1/4 speed and/or additionally set fraps to NOT record sound, you can get smoother performance in your video.For viewers: you can just look at the aircraft strobe lights or similar and notice how fast they blink to kinda gauge what they/we are doing. My latest video shows how I did this. And no, I'm not as good as 99.9% of the people I've favorited...lol.It's also important to observe that the trend in FS movie making is going more towards the artistic (or motion picture for the lack of a better term) look and feel instead of the old 'in the cockpit/in game' look and feel, and without in game sound...for the most part, not all of course.As for product promotional videos (as in-from the developer itself), I would sure hope that the author(s) place an 'edited' disclaimer, IF EDITING WAS USED, and they type of editing done, if they're doing a video not reflecting actual in game usage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this