Sign in to follow this  
FlyingsCool

Mustang in Acceleration....takeoff learning curve!

Recommended Posts

I love the feeling of reality when "flying" the new P-51 Mustang in Acceleration.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

From what I have heard the torque on these planes is a huge factor. I know an instructor who flew to an airport that had pictures of a P-51 going off the runway and crashing. My instructor was remarking to his passenger that the pilot that had done that obviously didn't know about torque. The owner of the fbo came over and said "yes I was the dummy that did that". Apparently he had bought the bird, and quite an experienced pilot, got in it-and gave it full throttle for takeoff. The torque sent it right off the runway. If I recall what was said, you have to give it throttle very gradually, and be very busy on the rudder pedals. Not having flown one though I wouldn't know. Here is a site that tells how to fly it from a real flyer:http://www.migman.com/ref/pilots/Henriques/P51.htmhttp://mywebpages.comcast.net/geofa/pages/rxp-pilot.jpgForum Moderatorhttp://geofageofa.spaces.live.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't tried the Acceleration one yet - but some notes from the ** aircraft.Line up and LOCK the tailwheelSet the rudder trim about 5 degrees nose rightDo NOT set the parking brake and advance the throttleAdvance the throttle gradually and smoothly with the aircraft to start rolling from the start. Do not go to max power - only about 60-70 %Keep the stick well back until you achieve effective rudder control - 45-50 kts - only then let the tail rise off the groundWhen you come off the ground be ready to add a little right down wing.If your rudder trim is set correctly - the aircraft will have almost no tendancy to tilt over based on torque.But if your rudder trim is set to neutral and you use full throttle - it will flip on you every time.Use a real long runway to practice takeoffs.Practice with light fuel loads initially.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Check out my videos on my site of my flight on Crazy Horse (TF-51D Mustang). Lee Lauderback of Stallion 51 narrates the take off procedure on this flight! Or you can see more condensed version on youtube just search for "Crazy Horse tf51d"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone...I think I've been giving her full thottle on takeoff. Excellent sites to visit...thanks again. This plane is a challenge, but well worth it. Stan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a hint for taxiing this aircraft:Use a little rudder, in combination with the differential brakes. Turn the rudder in the direction you want to go BEFORE you want to turn, and when you're ready to turn ... tap the brakes. You'll start turning. Be prepared to reverse the rudder and tap the brakes again to stop the turn when you get where you want to go forward again.Easy on the gas boys.Cheers!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One other thing you might want to check is the sensitivity and null zone of your rudder pedals (and stick for that matter). I assume because they are attempting to keep the average Joe from overcontrolling, they are by default typically set around 50%, which gives nowhere near full travel of the control surfaces.At one point, I was attempting to practice stalls in a 172. And it worked fine on one computer, then I moved over to another and I couldn't get it to go. Then I remembered to check the sensitivity, and that was my problem.Thomas[a href=http://www.flyingscool.com] http://www.flyingscool.com/images/Signature.jpg [/a]I like using VC's :-)N15802 KASH '73 Piper Cherokee Challenger 180

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this