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Is 300 kts overspeed at FL35

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I was flying an Airbus A321 at 300kts and when I reached FL35 the overspeed warning went off. Is this a glitch or is that to fast at FL35? (sorry, I'm not an experienced pilot) If so, what is a good cruising speed at FL35 for the A321?Thanks

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Actually, you can rack up to 315 knots at 22,000 (FL220) and not hit over speed. BUT...you must watch (if using any weather program) for wind-shift from head to tail. When that occurs while aloft, you can pick up 10-60 knots at the drop of a hat! This is what might have happened to you. You could have had a wind shear and/or direction change.At FL350, you could be at Mach .78-82Mitch

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Make sure that you have the Use Indiocated Airspeed box checked in your Realism settings. As you climb and the air thins, indicated airspeed is less (considerably less at FL350) than true airspeed. If you were seeing 300 knots true airspeed at that altitude you were probably really going almost 600 knots.R-

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Max indicated changes with altitude, watch the 'redline' on the speedtape, and keep your IAS below that by 5-10 kts. That will compensate for most wind gusts, since FS doesn't handle wind shifts very well.

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FL 35 = 3500ft FL350 = 35,000ftWhich is it, you want advise on?

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Hello Dave,It was probably a typo on the O.P.'s part as FL's start at FL180 (18,000 feet). I posted this, not for your benefit, but for the O.P.'s, as he states he is new at flight simulation.:) Cheers,Mitch

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The difference between "regular" altitudes and Flight Levels is that a regular altitude is measured at local barometer pressure and flight levels are measured at standardised pressure (29.92 or 1013 depending on the unit). So if a controller tells you to ascend to FL180 that is not necessarily the same altitude as if he would've said 18000 feet.I fly on VATSIM and I have on occasion seen different transition altitudes, e.g. in one case flight levels started at FL140. But it's usually FL180 yeah.

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Just as an added comment,Below 10,000 feet A.S.L, (above sea level), you must maintain 250 or less knots of speed, mostly for aircraft separation, but also importantly to avoid a possible cockpit penetration through the windshield by birds and other airborne debris!Above 10,000 feet, you are allowed to turn off your landing lights (which MUST be illuminated at and/or below 10,000 feet A.S.L. for reasons of visibility and identification between airborne aircraft to avoid mid-air collisions).Above 10,000 feet, you can then adjust your climb speed to 310 knots quite safely. At 24,000 feet, (FL240) you then adjust your altimeter to display in Mach which is a defined ratio of the speed of sound (and the penetration of the Sound Barrier) Most high-level FL cruises are in the range of (for example 737-300's)---at a comfortable Mach .74The later version 737's 500-800 series can easily handle .78-.80 as their cruise speed. Most Airbus series can proceed at FL350 to FL390 at around .82 But...caveat...with the above, you must ALWAYS constantly monitor your Indicated Air Speed and react to different air direction and/or speed penetrations BEFORE the 'last call' warning horn goes off. Keep doing your T-Scan every 30 seconds of flight. No sleeping! :)Upon descent for the Approach, you maintain 300 Knots, as that is the transition reading speed to go back from reading in Mach, to then reading in Knots. BEFORE you pass through 10,000 feet, you have bled off to 250 knots or less. By about 5,000 feet, you transition to 250-200 knots of which you hold in any assigned holding pattern and until you are positioned at the initial ILS fix. At that time you may run the 'road' at 200 knots or most often, you bleed back to 180 knots and then finally, bleed off airspeed as necessary until you touch down at around 154 knots at flaps (F.E) (F.E.--fully extended)in for example, the Boeing 737 series of aircraft.Hope this helps,Mitch R.

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>Hello Dave,>>It was probably a typo on the O.P.'s part as FL's start at>FL180 (18,000 feet). I posted this, not for your benefit, but>for the O.P.'s, as he states he is new at flight simulation.:)> >>Cheers,>>Mitch>>Mitch,I can accept *one* typo but not three, even if he is new to flight simming?The simple solution would have been to write '35,000ft' just as simple as it was for me to do just now, instead of trying to run before walking eh?

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I have never seen a reference to a flight level below FL180 as you have stated here, anything below that (in my experience) is always rated to local regional barometric conditions. If you have indeed been told to go to a standard 'FL180' (18,000 feet A.S.L.) and above standard-rated 29.92 inches--- and/or a reference to FL's below 18,000 feet,---then that is a first hearing of this for me. :) New information always coming. :0 Of course you would dial in 29.92 if that was also reported below 18,000 feet as the local regional B.P.Mitch

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LOL!Ten-Four, Dave, Ten-Four...but give the O.P. a large high-five for gettin' right in there with the Sound Bytes! :) Good for him/herWe all stumbled when new...lol. I surely did.Cheers,Mitch'er

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the easy solution is to not go by knots, but by mach number once you go above 25 thousand feet

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Yes, 300kts IAS is way too fast at FL350. Remember, the amount of air molecules hitting the pitot tubes is far less at FL350 than at 5000 feet. The less air molecules hitting the pitot tubes the lower the IAS for a given Fight Level. For instance. At sea level 250kts with no wind is 250kts. In the thin air at 35,000 feet 240kts is about ~450 kts or around M.78. Most narrowbody aircraft cruise at around 480kts which would show around 250kts on the ASI.If you are doing 300kts IAS you are over M.85 which I belive is past Vne for an A320. Secondly, at that flight level you need to judge your speed by mach number NOT by knots. So a nice long range cruise for an Airbus should be around M.80 which is probably around 230-250kts IAS at FL350. At 300kts IAS at FL350 you'd rip the wings off.HTH,Mike T.

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Hi Mitch,<>Tut tut! ;-) That statement suggests you have never flown in Europe where transition altitudes (TA) vary quite a bit even in the same country.For example the TA at EGLL is 6000 whereas at EGCC it's 5000. At Amsterdam it's 3000ft. Just one of the joys of flying in different parts of the world.Correct TAs are used in Radar Contact - unlike the default ATC. End of shameless plug! ;-)

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