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byork

International cockpit procedure regulations?

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Hi,After having watched several DVDs from World Air Routes, it has come to my attention that the cockpit procedures vary very much from airline to airline. Some airlines have a frequent procedure communication between the captain and co-pilot, while on some airlines the communication is more or less zero. One clear example is the Cebu Pacific DVD. Those DC9 pilots hardly reads the checklists,...and procedure communication beween pilots is second to none. In other words,...the cockpit atmnosphere is almost completely quiet.My question is,..isn

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I'm not a pilot, but based on what I read and learned in this hobby, my impression has been that cockpit procedures/protocol are determined by each airline. Not sure what authority would mandate "international" procedures.I'm sure others with RW knowledge will chime in here.

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Ok, I can understand that there probably is no authority that determine an "international" procedure. But my question is more towards,..isn

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I agree with your thought that there should be some (more or less)standard protocol, but it seems to me this would be governed by the "end-users"- namely, the airlines.I'm still thinking that someone more knowledgeable than I will weigh in here.

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Most airlinw have Cockp[it/Crew Resoource Management (CRM) policies that deal with this. In particular they require the pilot in charge to brief other crew member fully about his intentions. I believe that airlines are required by the relevant authorities to have a CRM programme but that the details are left to the airlines.http://www.airlinesafety.com/editorials/CR...ructorsView.htmAlso many airlines have a policy of forbidding extraneous conversations at critical periods of flight.

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There are recommendations - but no authority to enforce a standard across the international boundaries.Even within a country, the regulating authority only monitors airline training procedures and standard practices. If something is out of line, they will recommend / require changes. But it is really down to the individual airline.At one time many of the world's pilots had military backgrounds/ training - so that was about as close to an international standard as ever existed.Pilots are humans and during slow periods they are going to talk and not always about the job.The videos you mention are nice - but to base your view of an airline's procedure on those is a bit unrealistic. The crews know they are being filmed and are on their best behavior, everything by the book, while on camera.

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Doing FS2Crew, and modeling the SOPs of various airlines, it's striking how different things are from company to company.In the ATR version, for example, the pilots are non stop talking. You'd think all the talking gets in the way of flying the plane.In the 747 version, by contrast, the airline I modeled employed more of a 'quite flight deck' philosophy, and they really only call abnormals.I personally think the later is a much better system, especially in glass cockpit plane when everything is laid out right in front of you. You should only speak when you have something relevant to say.-Bryan

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Bryan-Thanks for your post! My curiosity grew during this thread.

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Sometimes it also depends on how long we (the crew) have been together for the day. If we've been together for most of the day, or have been in the hotel together on an overnighter, than there may be very little left to have a conversation about on the home leg. If, on the other hand, this is the first flight we've had together in some time then we may have something other than flying to talk about.And, as stated earlier, we are humans and therefor we all have our differences.............some love to talk, others don't.John

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Are you talking about just conversation or actually calling out checklists?It seems to me that you are talking about actual checklist procedures that would actually be challenged and responded.Is there some of the airlines that don't go over the checklists verbally?

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It varies so much. Generally non pertinent conversation should be avoided as much as possible. Some airlines will have hard and fast rules on this.Checklists, again, from the FS2Crew example, it varies so much. At some airlines the PNF will read the whole section of the checklist by himself (challenge and respond), while other will have the PF and PNF run the checklists together, or some variation of that.. Others will read some sections silently (usually the after landing checklist). Others will throw their own unique spin on both the above. There are a million ways to skin a cat. Everyone has their own way of doing things.-Bryan

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