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Cessnaflyer

Engine falls off plane

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Scary, thank goodness it had enough power in the remaining engine to land safely. I think the pilot deserves a mention though, he undoubtedly had skill.

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>Scary, thank goodness it had enough power in the remaining>engine to land safely. I think the pilot deserves a mention>though, he undoubtedly had skill.Turbojets are required for certification, to lose all but one engine at rotation speed/decision speed (Vr, V1) and continue a climb.Meaning, a 747-400 weighing 850,000lbs at MTOW should be able to lose 3 engines and continue with the take off and climbout, returning to land. It seems crazy, but it's the truth, at least they say.

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I think it's to loose half it's engines...I don't think a 744 at MTOW will even climb 1 foot on one single engine even providing 120%.On ETOPS operations, an a/c has to be able to sustain flight on a single engine for 180mins to be able to reach land safely.Anyone know where to look for such detailed certification information? FAA perhaps?George DorkofikisAthens, Hellashttp://online.vatsimindicators.net/811520/1704.png

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After the American Airlines DC-10 crash in Chicago - the industry began to seriously consider what would happen if an engine physically separated from the aircraft and how to fly and land safely.A Piedmont Airlines B732 had an engine come off the aircraft at KORD while the plane was about 1,000 ft AGL on climb out - and safely returned to KORD - in January 1989 - about 10 years after the AAL DC-10 crash at the same airport.

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>After the American Airlines DC-10 crash in Chicago - the>industry began to seriously consider what would happen if an>engine physically separated from the aircraft and how to fly>and land safely.>>A Piedmont Airlines B732 had an engine come off the aircraft>at KORD while the plane was about 1,000 ft AGL on climb out ->and safely returned to KORD - in January 1989 - about 10 years>after the AAL DC-10 crash at the same airport.>well the AA crash had more to do with the bad design of the DC10 coupled with a forklift than losing an engine. bad design being told to fly V2 on an engine separation and the slats retracting due to hydraulic fluid loss and thus leading to a single wing stall.

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Your close Kreg. A twin engine aircraft, and I can't remember the exact wording, has to be able to lose one engine just past V1. This means that the aircraft is committed to takeoff. The aircraft has to be able to complete a circuit and land. For a 747, the same rule applies. Being a 4 engine aircraft I think that the aircraft has to be able to lose 1 engine just after V1. The plane has to be able to complete a circuit and land. The number is not 3 but I am not sure if the 747 has to be able to land if it looses 2 engines. I think it is just 1 though.JimCYWG

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Your right Reg. If only it could realized that the wing had stalled and to lower the nose.JimCYWG

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> Your close Kreg. A twin engine aircraft, and I can't>remember the exact wording, has to be able to lose one engine>just past V1. This means that the aircraft is committed to>takeoff. > The aircraft has to be able to complete a circuit and land.>For a 747, the same rule applies. Being a 4 engine aircraft I>think that the aircraft has to be able to lose 1 engine just>after V1. The plane has to be able to complete a circuit and>land. The number is not 3 but I am not sure if the 747 has to>be able to land if it looses 2 engines. I think it is just 1>though.>>Jim>CYWGWell, my grandfather flew 747-200/300's across the ponds all the time, and he said "technically" they are supposed to be able to lose all 3. Would they actually be able to? I highly doubt it.

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Didn't the 747-200 flying UA811, returned to Honolulu and landed with just two engines after the cargo door blew open?NTSB report : http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_id=2...213X27705&key=1So it is possible...On the other hand, if something like that occur during t/o or initial climb, it may lead to disaster.. See ElAl Cargo 747 Amsterdam crash where the 742F lost (physically) #3 and #4 during climb.The crew managed to keep it flying for quite long, but once they started slowing down the a/c stalled and crashed. What they didn't know if that the #3 engine was detached and instead of falling properly, it crashed on #4 engine detaching it as well, taking along a lot of wing surface.(Info from the Discovery documentary)George DorkofikisAthens, Hellashttp://online.vatsimindicators.net/811520/1704.png

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I think a 744 would fly a while on one engine, but takeoff and go around? No chance, even empty I don't think the thrust would be high enough.

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It's statistically impossible to loose 3 engines on take-off, but in such case, the logical thing I would do would be to abort take-off even after v1, burn down the brakes, and pray for level hard surface after the runway end... Maybe with a little chance the gear won't collapse, or maybe collapse at a slow enough speed for the a/c not to brake apart.I'd like to emphasize that I'm NOT a real pilot, so any comment from a real 747 pilot would be quite welcome.George DorkofikisAthens, Hellashttp://online.vatsimindicators.net/811520/1704.png

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