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Guest thebarnstormer

Iid it again.

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I did it again :( I landed my Lago Beech Staggerwing D-11S with the gear up. This old-timer in the real world can sell for as high as half a million dollars!Anybody there in sim land care to share (confess?) to similar mishaps?--Roger

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:-)And in the real world it was tested to survive a gear up landing by Walter Beech himself...

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Maybe you should change your username to "QuickStopLanding"... :-)Seriously, just a few days ago I forgot to check for three greens in an FSD Seneca V. It didn't register as a crash, so it must have been gentle. Of course, it *was* on multiplayer... and they noticed...In real life, my father did the same thing in a Piper Aztec. It was a Robertson STOL conversion... STOL conversions according to insurance companies have a higher rate of gear up incidents due to increased pilot workload.Best Regards, Donald T. :-wave

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I've probably done all sorts of things in my years of simming. Even if I go a long time without it now, I make mistakes or forget things. Gear up landings, flaps, and other big mistakes don't occur as often now since I've been at it so long and all planes have them. The mistakes I can still make now are the ones only unique to certain aircraft, such as Prop Sync or fuel pump.What is necessary and helps in the real world for a lot of pilots are the checklists. I don't know what situations require them, although I imagine commercial is mandatory, but being able to look at a piece of paper and follow the steps will help you. Some planes are much easier and the more you fly them, the more you'll remember what needs to be done during each phase.

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Then there is the famous story of the student on a checkride that was so busy reading his checklist and checking off items in preflight that he didn't notice that the plane was missing a prop! Sometimes people get so engrossed in the checklist that they don't observe properly.I have a personal routine to check the landing gear 3 times before landing checklist or not-distractions or not that has worked pretty well for me.I don't reach 3 checks I don't land (including a visual check of the nosegear in a mirror).Even with checklists it is sometimes easy to skip a line or screw up.Unfortunately that is just being human. Look at the Crash in Detroit where the flight crew both neglected to put out flaps for takeoff.GeofaMy blog:http://geofageofa.spaces.live.com/

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"I have a personal routine to check the landing gear 3 times before landing checklist or not-distractions or not that has worked pretty well for me.I don't reach 3 checks I don't land (including a visual check of the nosegear in a mirror)."That is a great mentality to take with you to the skies. I don't have to worry about dropping the legs, but I do take safety as seriously as you apparently do. It amazes me how there are so many accidents caused by pilot error. Not trying to speak ill of anyone, but a simple mistake can hurt you, everyone onboard, and the unsuspecting people below. Now that I've said that I wonder what I'll forget on my way to Tampa tomorow.

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Have a great flight. I flew down to Tampa (Sarasota actually) to attend the Aopa expo 3 or 4 years ago.Met the ms team-still remember Hall practicing landing the Dc2 on St. Barts after hours-what a great enthusiastic group of flyers/simmers they were/are.GeofaMy blog:http://geofageofa.spaces.live.com/

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>I have a personal routine to check the landing gear 3 times>before landing checklist or not-distractions or not that has>worked pretty well for me.I don't reach 3 checks I don't land>(including a visual check of the nosegear in a mirror).Exactly when flying the travel air or bonanza I would check it right when I threw the handle abeam the threshold, again on base with flap extension, and then on final centerline check.

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I was fortunate enough to have a Dad who was a flight instructor/charter pilot... I soloed at 16. Of course being a teenager I knew "everything". It got me into a couple situations where, luckily, only a few bruises... especially to the ego. Whenever I feel myself starting to feel a bit overconfident I remember that cocky teenager and double, triple, quadruple my checks. I've learned the hard way that the only way is to check and recheck... for example; if your sure the gear are down... check again. After all these years it's a mental routine that now comes naturally... I don't take anything for granted. That's not to say I don't enjoy the flight! I do, or I wouldn't fly... I just want to be around to take the next one.Jerry

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