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rgamurot

Flying near Equator dangerous

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This is the only way I can maintain speed whenever I fly at the equator. 2.jpgThe only time this happens is when I'm at the equator. Now I know real pilots don't avoid this region. There has to be something I haven't tried yet. Any thoughts? Also, how long can I run like this before something really bad happens?EDIT: I re-enabled the EEC but even if I throttle to idle, the red boxes around my N1 is still there. Did I break something? Ryan GamurotLucky to live Hawai'ihttp://www.virtualpilots.org/signatures/vpa296.png


Ryan Gamurot
 

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I'm now about 10 degrees south of the equator and safely back at FL370. I ended up descending to FL185 just to maintain speed. I was thinking, if they know they'll be flying over bad weather, will pilots carry less cargo to lighten the aircraft? I was flying with a maximum ZFW. If I were to carry only passengers and their luggage (assuming 75lbs each), may this help?Also, those red boxes around my N1 are still there.EICAS.jpgRyan GamurotLucky to live Hawai'ihttp://www.virtualpilots.org/signatures/vpa296.png


Ryan Gamurot
 

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Ryan,You using real world weather? If so I'm betting some pressure/temp values are out of range for whatever reason in the data...There is a ton of CB activity in that area (called the Intertropical Convergence Zone) but I doubt that's the issue here.


Ryan Maziarz
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Yeah, I was using Active Sky. I got caught in some heavy turbulence which is also when the problem started. Since this always happens with CB activity in the ITCZ, I guess AS does something funny with the numbers.What about the conditions of the engines? If it were real life, would they still be on the wings after 15 minutes?Ryan GamurotLucky to live Hawai'ihttp://www.virtualpilots.org/signatures/vpa296.png


Ryan Gamurot
 

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Your OAT is way too high...in the first shot, it's hard to read, but it looks like a TAT of -7 deg C and a TAS of 675 (!!) at FL370. Looks like you're getting wacky temp data from AS...and that'd do exactly what you're seeing.RegardsBob ScottATP IMEL Gulfstream II-III-IV-VSantiago de Chile


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By any chance, where you zooming along in accelerated mode? I've got a suspicion (but untested) that TAT will increase running FS9 at Rx4 or x8; I've ruled out ActiveSky as the culprit. I've had TAT increase on long trips then finally settle back to normal after wx update yet the previous station was reporting normal temps. I'm going to play with this one of these days but other things are higher on my list of things to do.


Dan Downs KCRP

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Nope, I was running at 1x speed. And it's a TAT of +7 and TAS 479 at FL256. It looks like I'm climbing in that image but only for a few seconds. Like I said, I ended up at FL185. I'm still wondering if AS is really a wacky as we all think though. I know thunderstorms do release a lot of heat into the atmosphere from all the rain. Also, thunderstorms usually form in areas of low pressure. It could be that in the ITCZ, the pressure drops so much and so much heat is released that the air density falls ridiculously low and the aircraft simply must descend. (Now I wish I paid more attention in my high school meteorology class!)Ryan GamurotLucky to live Hawai'ihttp://www.virtualpilots.org/signatures/vpa296.png


Ryan Gamurot
 

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I am certain you shouldn't see +7 at that altitude. Anyway, thanks for settling my hypothesis. Thunderstorms work primarily on the concept of a parcel of air being lifted to where it is warmer than surrounding air and gains positive boyancy. The heat flow is carried by the water in the lifting air that releases energy when the air parcel finally cools to below saturation and vapor turns to precipitation, releasing the heat to the much cooler upper air. The pressure drop is mostly confined to the lower levels where the storm is fed energy from; although you may see minor dips on the 500mb constant level charts (a little lower than your flight) most of the pressure drop is lower (my understanding, but I'm an engineer not a meterologist).This last time I had the high TAT the ASv6 guys suggested I increase my suppression range to 120 nm; which I've done and not had the problem reoccur but I've not reallys tested it to confirm the fix.


Dan Downs KCRP

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I think the SAT was -20 or somewhere around there. At FL185, I had an SAT of -12 and TAT of +12 until my airspeed started dropping again. I'm not sure how increasing my suppression range will change anything but I'll give it a try on my flight back to London tomorrow.Thanks,Ryan GamurotLucky to live Hawai'ihttp://www.virtualpilots.org/signatures/vpa296.png


Ryan Gamurot
 

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