Sign in to follow this  
Guest Werd

Lol crazyness

Recommended Posts

HiAfter installing SP2 I'd like to mention few things.Fog layer simulation is awesome. Looks very cool. Dont know why my frame rate droped terribly during this approach, I'm not sure it's the fault of the fog-layer. But in any case it looks awesome.Small wind shifts are smoothed. To be honest I've never had huge shifts with SP1 (I had other problems indeed lol) - there was a lot of smallish shifts wich now dont exist. However I never had THAT lol :http://forums.avsim.net/user_files/181760.jpgEverything was fine during this approach when suddenly the plane was like hit by something from the left side several times. Lol nothing I could do. Never had it with SP1. Wierd?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

I keep ASX minimized after it does it's logon and initialization. Helps the framerates alot. at least on this box.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>I keep ASX minimized after it does it's logon and>initialization. Helps the framerates alot. at least on this>box.>Me too, I just opened it to see the wind speed/direction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you have an AI aircraft fly in front of you before this happened? It could be wake turbulence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>Did you have an AI aircraft fly in front of you before this>happened? It could be wake turbulence.You are my hero! Fortunately I made another screenshot:http://forums.avsim.net/user_files/181766.jpgThe visibility is 3 nm. So I guess he's like 1 nm from me?I was allready going to uninstall ASX lolDidnt think this wake effect could be so violent. I will disable it.Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was rolled 90-deg in a Seneca by a twin-turbprop ahead of me on final at Epply (KOMA), had full opposite controls to no avail. It really happens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also had a similar occurance. I was on final approach to KDEN in a DH2 when overflown by a 747, resulting in an uncommanded roll of approximately 120 degrees. Put me into a bit of a dive as well. I'm sure normal procedure would have been to go-around, but as I recovered, I noticed I was moments away from touchdown on the centerline, so I went ahead and landed.Never hurts to be lucky! ;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there,I'd just like to say thanks for starting this thread.... It is a classic example of AS technology meeting its primary goal of providing a realistic, entertaining and educational representation of weather and the atmosphere. In this case wake turbulence properly went into affect as the user aircraft crossed paths with the wake trail while the wake-generating aircraft was in landing (dirty) configuration, causing a strong rolling effect. During my initial private pilot training, on my first long solo cross country, I encountered wake turbulence on final to Ontario (California) causing my little Warrior II to roll through 90degrees towards inverted before my corrections took effect and I was able to right things. Apparently I was put in too close behind another landing aircraft that I didn't see due lighting and haze conditions. Needless to say it was a big learning experience and I've always wanted to share that kind of thing with users of AS.Talking about wake, did you know that even a small single-engine prop generates significant wake? While not as intense as a large aircraft, your own wake trail is certainly strong enough to cause aircraft in the same weight class to get shaken up a bit. In private pilot training while practicing steep turns, my instructor would never be happy unless we hit our own wake trail at the completion of the 360 degree turn. The aircraft would hit a decent "bump" of wake (kind of like going over a speedbump) to signal success. In a steep turn it doesn't take too long to come back around to your starting point so the wake doesn't have time to really sink. Anyhow, this same thing can be practiced in ASX with the advanced wake turbulence simulation. Give it a try! :)Best,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>Hi there,>>I'd just like to say thanks for starting this thread.... It>is a classic example of AS technology meeting its primary goal>of providing a realistic, entertaining and educational>representation of weather and the atmosphere. >>In this case wake turbulence properly went into affect as the>user aircraft crossed paths with the wake trail while the>wake-generating aircraft was in landing (dirty) configuration,>causing a strong rolling effect. >>During my initial private pilot training, on my first long>solo cross country, I encountered wake turbulence on final to>Ontario (California) causing my little Warrior II to roll>through 90degrees towards inverted before my corrections took>effect and I was able to right things. Apparently I was put>in too close behind another landing aircraft that I didn't see>due lighting and haze conditions. Needless to say it was a>big learning experience and I've always wanted to share that>kind of thing with users of AS.>>Talking about wake, did you know that even a small>single-engine prop generates significant wake? While not as>intense as a large aircraft, your own wake trail is certainly>strong enough to cause aircraft in the same weight class to>get shaken up a bit. In private pilot training while>practicing steep turns, my instructor would never be happy>unless we hit our own wake trail at the completion of the 360>degree turn. The aircraft would hit a decent "bump" of wake>(kind of like going over a speedbump) to signal success. In a>steep turn it doesn't take too long to come back around to>your starting point so the wake doesn't have time to really>sink. Anyhow, this same thing can be practiced in ASX with>the advanced wake turbulence simulation. Give it a try! :)>>Best,>SalutThanks for sharing your experience.What is really wierd is this "wake" turbulence doesnt just "disipate"! I mean you have an aircraft 1nm in front of you. 1nm is a lot! Even without considering wind the air turbulences should have been disipated. oh, ok I have 0 flight hours, so what? :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>What is really wierd is this "wake" turbulence doesnt just>"disipate"! I mean you have an aircraft 1nm in front of you.>1nm is a lot! Even without considering wind the air>turbulences should have been disipated. Werd, not so sir. Recommended spacing behind your average heavy is 4 miles for a light aircraft in the UK to avoid wake, for an A380 it's 6 miles! Wake turbulence is far more persistent than many people think and doesn't vanish as quick as you would expect. There used to be a superb video around of a 747 landing at Kai Tak, on approach it passed a vertical column of air from a smoke stack and it was actually landed before suddenly you saw the smoke violently spin into vortices, I can't find it now unfortunately but it was a fine example of a) How persistent vortices are and :( How violent they can be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this