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Guest flynman3

Riding Jumpseat has Helped My FS....

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...experience.Tonight I loaded up the Level-D 767 from MEM to SEA and flew in real time(4hr 5 min) and flew it as I have seen the real world Pilots do. When I arrived at ANVIL on the SEA 16R APP and captured the GS I hands flew it Stick and Power the rest of the way to the runway...It was IMO the prettiest landing Ive done in 8 years of Flight Simming....Yes seeing how it is done in the real world make a difference....oh BTW I am the newest Dispatcher at NWA as of Thursday morning..Im so excited.

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How did you manage a jump seat ride with the new restrictions?

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still a pretty hard accomplishment unless you are a pilot, thats good you had fun :)

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I am not sure abou the US but you can still ride jump IF you are a company employee and ALL the seats in the back are occupied.

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Ok before someone starts giving this young man a hard time. Let's make what he has said sweet and simple.1. He is an Aircraft Dispatcher2. He holds an ATP Certificate minus the flying portion, unless he was previously a pilot in a PIC position.3. He is considered an "Additional Crew Member (ACM)" since he now holds that status, this also allows him the priviledge to ride the jumpseat on NWA (which is his employer), and most airlines. However, he must be a participating member of CASS. What is CASS you may ask? Well here goes:Cockpit Access Security System: - CASSCASS allows airline gate attendants to quickly determine whether an aircraft operator employee from a participating airline is authorized to access an aircraft

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My post wasn't intended to give anyone a hard time, on the contrary I envy him completely and wish him good luck. It's just that I was led to believe that '911' had changed ALL the laws including employees too for security reasons?Thanks for your comprehensive explanation. Can you tell me what a dispatcher is please?

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I know your weren't trying to give him a hard time....LOL. However you are correct, after 9/11 the rules became more strict in deternmining who has legal access to the cockpit, thus making it even more difficult for passengers (especially kids) to view the flightdeck during flight (totally different experience, opposed to being parked at the gate).Job Description of the AIRCRAFT DISPATCHER:The Aircraft Dispatcher is a licensed airman certificated by the Federal Aviation Administration, who has joint responsibility with the captain for the "safety and operational control" of flights under his/her guidance. Dispatchers regulate and control commercial airline flights according to government and company regulations to expedite and ensure safety of flight, and is also responsible for economics, passenger service and operational control of day to day flight operations. Evaluates meteorological information to determine potential hazards to safety of flight and to select the most desirable and economic route of flight. Computes the amount of fuel required for the safe completion of flight according to type of aircraft, distance of flight, maintenance limitations, weather conditions and minimum fuel requirements prescribed by federal aviation regulations. Prepares flight plans containing information such as maximum allowable takeoff and landing weights, weather reports, field conditions, NOTAMS and many other informational components required for the safe completion of flight. Also responsible for preparing and signing the dispatch release which is the legal document providing authorization for a flight to depart. Delays or cancels flights if unsafe conditions threaten the safety of his/her aircraft or passengers. Monitors weather conditions, aircraft position reports, and aeronautical navigation charts to evaluate the progress of flight. Updates the pilot in command of significant changes to weather or flight plan and recommends flight plan alternates, such as changing course, altitude and, if required, enroute landings in the interest of safety and economy. Originates and disseminates flight information to others in his/her company including stations and reservations. This is the source of information provided to the traveling public. Undergoes extensive training to have earned the coveted Aircraft Dispatcher's certificate having taken and passed both an extensive oral examination and the comprehensive Dispatch ADX test, administered by the Federal Aviation Administration. These tests are equivalent to the same Air Transport Pilot (ATP) written and oral examinations that an airline captain must successfully complete. Participates in frequent and detailed recurrent training courses covering aircraft systems, company operations policy, crew resource management, meteorology and Federal Air Regulations as required by the FAA.

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>>>...experience.>>Tonight I loaded up the Level-D 767 from MEM to SEA and flew>in real time(4hr 5 min) and flew it as I have seen the real>world Pilots do. When I arrived at ANVIL on the SEA 16R APP>and captured the GS I hands flew it Stick and Power the rest>of the way to the runway...It was IMO the prettiest landing>Ive done in 8 years of Flight Simming....>>Yes seeing how it is done in the real world make a>difference....oh BTW I am the newest Dispatcher at NWA as of>Thursday morning..Im so excited.Sounds like a lot of fun real and virtual :-)Success in your new job :-)Hav fun,Andr

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