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BobP

Vista 32 bit to Vista 64

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I apologize if this is the wrong forum. I could not find one set aside for OS discussions. I have a Velocity Micro computer with Home Premium Vista 32 (OEM) as the operating system. I want to go to 64Bit Home Premium. I can't find any non-upgrade (i.e. XP to Vista) packages available except Vista for system builders. Is that what I should buy? Thanks in advance.Bob..

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Excellent Microsoft Article here that should cover your questions:http://support.microsoft.com/kb/932795With regards to this being the correct forum or not - alot tend to ask OS related questions in the Hardware forum, located here:http://forums1.avsim.net/index.php?showforum=326Hope that helps :(
It did help, thank you! Of course MS requires that I remove Vista 32, install Windows XP then use the Vista 64 upgrade (new purchase). I'm more than happy to pay for an upgrade price for Vista 64, however, the convoluted path is typical of some knucklehead marketing exec.Can I use this:http://www.cosmogadget.com/pd-microsoft-wi...ish-1pk-oem.cfmOr does the software check the computer hardware to prevent installation on a commercial (Velocity Micro) computer? Is the version linked an upgrade version? Or can I install it on my computer and skip the XP step? Thanks again.Bob..Bob..

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Of course MS requires that I remove Vista 32, install Windows XP then use the Vista 64 upgrade (new purchase). I'm more than happy to pay for an upgrade price for Vista 64, however, the convoluted path is typical of some knucklehead marketing exec.
Well if you're thinking of going through the trouble of installing XPjust to upgrade, you may as well buy the full OEM copy of Vista 64, and just install it fresh by booting the computer from the DVD. (After backing up your important files and data of course!)With regards to the software checking the hardware, the only Vista install DVDs that do this are ones that say they are for a particular OEM brand (such as Dell or Fujitsu Siemens). A standard unbranded Vista OEM DVD should install on any hardware. The one on the site you linked to should be fine, and is a pretty good price.

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It did help, thank you! Of course MS requires that I remove Vista 32, install Windows XP then use the Vista 64 upgrade (new purchase). I'm more than happy to pay for an upgrade price for Vista 64, however, the convoluted path is typical of some knucklehead marketing exec.Can I use this:http://www.cosmogadget.com/pd-microsoft-wi...ish-1pk-oem.cfmOr does the software check the computer hardware to prevent installation on a commercial (Velocity Micro) computer? Is the version linked an upgrade version? Or can I install it on my computer and skip the XP step? Thanks again.Bob..Bob..
I would be cautious about that site. It says of the 64 bit Vista The purchaser of this software is required to comply with the terms of the System Builder license, including the responsibility of providing all end-user support for the software. An obvious question is does it include a System Builder Licence or is that something you have to buy separately? If don't you have such a licence Microsoft may detect this and block upgrades.

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I would be cautious about that site. It says of the 64 bit Vista The purchaser of this software is required to comply with the terms of the System Builder license, including the responsibility of providing all end-user support for the software.
Which basically usually means you have to purchase a token piece of hardware (such as a cheap mouse or similar) with the software (at least thats how most vendors here in the UK do it). The system builder licence comes with all OEM discs. You can view the license here. (PDF reader required).

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Which basically usually means you have to purchase a token piece of hardware (such as a cheap mouse or similar) with the software (at least thats how most vendors here in the UK do it). The system builder licence comes with all OEM discs. You can view the license here. (PDF reader required).
Thank you again! I could not find anything but the OEM versions of Vista Home Premium 64 bit and you answered my questions. Bob.. :)

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Which basically usually means you have to purchase a token piece of hardware (such as a cheap mouse or similar) with the software (at least thats how most vendors here in the UK do it). The system builder licence comes with all OEM discs. You can view the license here. (PDF reader required).
The System Builder License shows that this is un-licensed software. To distribute it the distributor must be a System Builder (Clause 2) and it can only be distributed with a Computer System (Clause 13). For the avoidance of doubt a computer system is defined as a fully assembled computer sytem that includes a CPU, a motherboard, a power supply, an internally mounted NAND or revolving magnetic-based hatrd drive and a case. A cheap mouse doesn't count!Illegal Volume Licenced versions of XP were also offered recently. Microsoft discovered the keys involved and, though it couldn't prevent them being installed, it did prevent them being upgraded.Why are people prepared to pay US$99.99 for such software when a they could get it for nothing from a pirate site - a sop to their conciences?

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It's not unlicensed nor illegal. It comes with an OS license and genuine product key.I've bought OEM software myself and alot of the major online computer software retailers sell them here.How do you think 'System Builders' get the software themselves? They buy it from suppliers that aren't necessarily 'system builders', just software suppliers. You are, in effect, buying the software to build a system yourself, and 'distributing' that system to yourself.

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It's not unlicensed nor illegal. It comes with an OS license and genuine product key.I've bought OEM software myself and alot of the major online computer software retailers sell them here.How do you think 'System Builders' get the software themselves? They buy it from suppliers that aren't necessarily 'system builders', just software suppliers. You are, in effect, buying the software to build a system yourself, and 'distributing' that system to yourself.
The wording of the advert is ambiguous. It doesn't actually state that it includes a System Builders Licence. Nor does it that it includes a CoA. I would be cautious and assume it includes neither.OEMs buy from Microsoft or its authorised re-sellers to get properly licenced copies.If a copy is properly licenced there would be no need to buy a cheap mouse or similar with it as you say usually happens in the UK. The licence requires a complete computer system.

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I purchased an OEM version of Windows XP Home Edition for my old PC (it was supplied with a basic mouse), and I never had any problems with it.

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I purchased an OEM version of Windows XP Home Edition for my old PC (it was supplied with a basic mouse), and I never had any problems with it.
By no stretch of the imagination can a basic mouse be described as a fully assembled computer sytem that includes a CPU, a motherboard, a power supply, an internally mounted NAND or revolving magnetic-based hatrd drive and a case. XP was therefore supplied in breach of its licence.

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Dog...chewing...wasp... :( It is what it is and it's how software vendors sell OEM software to consumers (not businesses/system builders). Have done for years, and Microsoft doesn't seem to mind. If Microsoft was bothered, it would make companies or individuals register as a System Builder to obtain OEM software, and then state that the software must not be resold as an OEM kit (unless to a MS registered System Builder), only as pre-installed on Hardware.I repeat, the OEM software comes with an OS license in the box, and a genuine product key. When you install the software, you agree to the same EULA as everyone else does for installing/running XP or Vista. What you don't get is the shiny curved plastic consumer packaging - just a DVD in a brown box with its license.Edited to qualify: "It is what it is and it's how software vendors sell OEM software to consumers (not businesses/system builders)"

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By no stretch of the imagination can a basic mouse be described as a fully assembled computer sytem that includes a CPU, a motherboard, a power supply, an internally mounted NAND or revolving magnetic-based hatrd drive and a case. XP was therefore supplied in breach of its licence.
Amazon sells an OEM Vista Home Premium w/SP1 64bit OS. (not the one linked above). There is no mention of additional hardware required. Why should I pay double for the full retail version? Bob..

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Amazon sells an OEM Vista Home Premium w/SP1 64bit OS. (not the one linked above). There is no mention of additional hardware required. Why should I pay double for the full retail version? Bob..
See the following link:http://blogs.msdn.com/mssmallbiz/archive/2.../07/461950.aspx ...It is now very simple and straightforward: an OEM license must be sold "only with a fully assembled computer system... ...it must also be preinstalled on the fully assembled computer system that it is being sold with...The fact that no hardware is mentioned proves that it is being sold in breach of the licence agreement.Let me reply to your question with another one:"Why should you pay anything for a flight simulator pay-ware add-on when you can get it free from a pirate website?"

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