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Cuddly1956

JS4100

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Just a quick question? Is the J41 Category B or C?Guessing C as approach is 123knots and B stops at 121 but I think a valid question. Or does it vary?John Ellison

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Guest BlueRidgeDx
Just a quick question? Is the J41 Category B or C?Guessing C as approach is 123knots and B stops at 121 but I think a valid question. Or does it vary?John Ellison
The J41 is Category B for "Straight-in" and Category C for "Circling".Regards,Nick

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EDIT: As above. It is speed dependent.According to the manual, 170 kts is holding speed, minimum manouvering is 160 kts in approach config (Flaps 9). This makes it a Cat. C aircraft.Straight in can be high speed (clean, 180 kts so you don't slow down the big guys) making it Cat. B.Best regards,Robin.

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Guessing C as approach is 123knots
123 KT only for some particular landing weight and approach type (say no gusts, etc.). At least FAA wants you to use the actual approach speed YOU will be flying to determine speed category for the aircraft. So ultimately your category may vary depending on the weather and landing weight.By the book- category is based on 1.3 * stall speed in landing configuration (full flaps, landing gear down, etc.)

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Cheers guys, bit more attention to categories for me DOH! Should have known that.At least I'll be able to see which bit of the charts to read lol.John Ellison

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Robin,When you get the JS4100, go ahead and fly an approach at 180KIAS and let me know how that works for you. My guess is that if you get the wheels on the ground, you'll be standing on the brakes hollering, "WHOA! I SAY, I SAY WHOA, BOY!" all the way through the fence at the departure end of the runway. :(You're gonna want to be crossing the FAF at your target speed, which is in the mid-120's to low-130's.

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You think?I can do an approach starting 18 miles out in the MD-11, set idle thrust at 15 nm and be at Vref crossing the threshold.Flaps/gear on the speeds; nice. cool.gifI don't touch the thrust until selecting reverse. Try it. :) You don't need quite as much distance if turns are involved, obviously.Best regards,Robin.

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EDIT: As above. It is speed dependent.According to the manual, 170 kts is holding speed, minimum manouvering is 160 kts in approach config (Flaps 9). This makes it a Cat. C aircraft.Straight in can be high speed (clean, 180 kts so you don't slow down the big guys) making it Cat. B.Best regards,Robin.
Is a "180kt to the marker" (5 mile final) approach a possibility? I hear it a lot for jets at KATL to expedite traffic flow inbound...I wonder if the same applies to aircraft like the JS41.

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Robin,As long as you hit the numbers, you'll be okay. Last weekend, I let ATC decide when I should start my descent into KSBA (which meant we started down late), and we came whistling across the threshold at 138 KIAS and 22,000 lbs -- 25 knots fast. With reverse, spoilers out, and full braking, it still took 6,000 feet of runway to get on the ground and slow down enough to make a turnoff.Consider this: The props on the JS4100 won't slow you down like they do in a PT6-powered turboprop. At flight idle, you're still carrying 22% torque.

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Is a "180kt to the marker" (5 mile final) approach a possibility?
That doesn't sound right to me no matter of this is a jet or turboprop. Tower/ATC would not typically rush you this way, that would be flying unstable approach even in a 747. They may ask for higher speed of someone who is typically very slow (Beech Baron?) to better merge with jet traffic. Depending on an airport they typically shoot for 90 sec spacings between landings so maintaining abnormally high approach speeds ultimately would not buy you anything.

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Guest BlueRidgeDx
Tower/ATC would not typically rush you this way, that would be flying unstable approach even in a 747.
We get this all the time, prop or not, when heading into a hub. I've heard it (from the jumpseat) at ORD, IAD, MEM, CVG, DTW, and plenty of others. It makes things "fun", and yes, once in a while you can't configure or get slowed down, and you go missed. But not frequently.Regarding the approach category, I'm fairly certain that this is based on the maximum "certified" weights and speeds. It's not calculated dynamically, and your approach category does not change based on your approach speed "that day". It's always the same "certified" value. In the case of the J41, B for straight in, and C for circling. This does not change.Think of it like the "heavy" callsign. If your airplane is capable of being a "heavy", then it is always a heavy, regardless of whether you're actually over the weight limit or not.Regards,Nick

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That doesn't sound right to me no matter of this is a jet or turboprop. Tower/ATC would not typically rush you this way, that would be flying unstable approach even in a 747. They may ask for higher speed of someone who is typically very slow (Beech Baron?) to better merge with jet traffic. Depending on an airport they typically shoot for 90 sec spacings between landings so maintaining abnormally high approach speeds ultimately would not buy you anything.
Have a listen to ATL approach some time... for 26R, you'll here "maintain 180 to AJAAY" all the time (5.1 mile final)...http://204.108.4.16/d-tpp/0909/00026IL26R.PDFEDIT: Listening now - I've been hearing 170kts to SCHEL for 8L (5.5 mile final)

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