Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

MrBenevolent

Student pilot intercepted by F16s after straying...

Recommended Posts

Where in that story, did it mention the pilot was a student pilot? All it said was he was a lone pilot of a PA28, who obviously didn't read or understand the Notams for the day.

Share this post


Link to post

Where in that story, did it mention the pilot was a student pilot? All it said was he was a lone pilot of a PA28, who obviously didn't read or understand the Notams for the day.

 

Indeed! It said on the twitter feed that I originally picked it up from that he was a student, but not in that article that I ended up linking to...so I guess the details are slightly muddled!

Share this post


Link to post

Try flying pipeline patrol in the Washington, DC area. What a B*** that is. With all of the SFRA, FRZ, restricted, and prohibited areas it's nearly impossible not to agitate a controller. My friend, who regularly does the patrol in that area now (I've since moved on to less stressful things), was intercepted first by an F-16, and then followed to the ground by a Coast Guard chopper. State Police and Secret Service met him on the ground with M-16s (though they were very friendly to him). No displinary action was taken, but it's a testament to what a "cluster" the DC area is. TFRs are the same way --details can be cryptic and at times they can be somewhat unpredictable.

Share this post


Link to post

TFRs are the same way --details can be cryptic and at times they can be somewhat unpredictable.

 

Yeah I was flying around one day when a controller called another aircraft and said, "Cessna XYZ, you are inside of an active TFR." The pilot asked when they made the TFR because he didn't have it on any of his NOTAMs an hour ago. The controller said it was made 10 minutes ago because of a forest fire 20 miles away ha ha. Nothing came about it because he was near the edge of it anyway.

Share this post


Link to post

TFRs are the same way --details can be cryptic and at times they can be somewhat unpredictable.

 

I know that some of you are not true fans of my GPS thoughts...........

 

But I sure appreciate it, when a TFR & dimensions, show up on my moving map.....thanks to XM Satellite weather. One afternoon, a forest fire TFR actually changed shape from a circle to a parallelogram and added more area within a few hours. This is something you might not catch, by phone or land based computer.

 

Yeah I was flying around one day when a controller called another aircraft and said, "Cessna XYZ, you are inside of an active TFR." The pilot asked when they made the TFR because he didn't have it on any of his NOTAMs an hour ago. The controller said it was made 10 minutes ago because of a forest fire 20 miles away ha ha. Nothing came about it because he was near the edge of it anyway.

 

And I just posted about a forest fire TFR at the same moment....

Share this post


Link to post

 

I know that some of you are not true fans of my GPS thoughts...........

 

But I sure appreciate it, when a TFR & dimensions, show up on my moving map.....thanks to XM Satellite weather. One afternoon, a forest fire TFR actually changed shape from a circle to a parallelogram and added more area within a few hours. This is something you might not catch, by phone or land based computer.

 

And I just posted about a forest fire TFR at the same moment....

 

In all fairness, modern GPS really comes in handy. On the other hand, one shouldn't expect XM or any other medium to keep you 100% up to date on TFRs. That's where calling the FSS or filing with DUATS becomes a life saver... Or rather a license saver. (same argument, different day :P)

Share this post


Link to post

Bet that gave the guy a fright. I once had two RAF Harriers pass either side of me, head on, at low level when they were in a combat spread formation. They were only about fifty feet above me, and I'm not even sure they saw me, although even if they did there probably wasn't much they could do about it since they were going at what I reckon was about 400 knots. I passed through their wake turbulence and my aircraft rolled about 120 degrees to the right before I got it back under control and I was only at about 800 feet AGL at the time. That kind of thing wakes you up LOL.

 

Al

Share this post


Link to post
Bet that gave the guy a fright. I once had two RAF Harriers pass either side of me, head on, at low level when they were in a combat spread formation. They were only about fifty feet above me, and I'm not even sure they saw me, although even if they did there probably wasn't much they could do about it since they were going at what I reckon was about 400 knots. I passed through their wake turbulence and my aircraft rolled about 120 degrees to the right before I got it back under control and I was only at about 800 feet AGL at the time. That kind of thing wakes you up LOL.

 

Al

 

Interesting story, Al.

 

Last winter I had a harrowing encounter with a National Guard UH-60 Blackhawk. On an ILS (300ft overcast and 1mile vis.) into Rowan County Airport, the Blackhawk had called right crosswind. Little did I know he was actually right *base* as I was a mile final. He turned final in front of me... as far as I can tell he had to have been IMC. My aircraft (while still IMC!!!) rolled abruptly left 45 degrees and then right 60 degrees in what was apparently the wake turbulence of the Blackhawk. I immediately initiated a missed and recollected myself for another try, while firmly telling the rotor jockey to get his "stuff" straight. All ended well in a nice, constructive chat with the base commander ( most of those guys are always trying to be helpful). It did cause quite the controversy around KRUQ, though!

 

Now this is hangar chat! :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
×
×
  • Create New...