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TracyQ

Advice please-best plane to learn navigation, in FSX?

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I have, on Kindle, Microsoft Flight Simulator For Pilots Real World Training, and it uses all stock FSX planes, so maybe that is best, but I also have a few addon planes, i.e., Carenado 337 , 152, 185, etc.

 

Also a few others, which I doubt are suitable, such as the L-39, LOL.

 

So far, my FSX flying has been 98% "roads and rivers", with the remaining 2% GPS. Really want to learn how to fly by the VOR's, NDB's, etc.

 

Suggestions? Or just stick with stock and the Learning Center?

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172 should be fine. You dont want anything too fast untill you get the hang of it, but realy it doesnt make any difference. Any GA plane should do. Its just a matter of making a flight plan between two airports you have never flown between and finding your way there.

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Stick with the stock aeroplanes and the learning centre as you say. When learning the basics of VOR and NDB navigation, the textures of the VC and the flight model hardly matter very much, all that really matters is your understanding of the task at hand, so a default Cessna or Mooney is good enough for the task, you don't even need to bother with ATC much either, just fly the route and stick to tuning the nav aids and working out your position from that.

 

When you sussed it all out, then you can throw fancy Carenados, ATC add-ons and all that other stuff. It's a good idea to get a pen and paper and write down the nav aid frequencies and headings of your planned route etc, then you can simply cross out or tick your list of nav aids you no longer need to tune in to on your route as you go and you won't have to keep faffing about with the nav log menu or the map in FS. Writing it all out also 'puts it in your head' prior to the flight, so you will find it easier to follow the plan as you go when actually flying it.

 

GPS and radios are great, but you can't beat a bit of paper and a rough drawing of your route on a map with the frequencies noted down on it, which you can glance at often when it comes to being aware of what to do next and what you should tune into and when, and you don't need fancy charts, a rough drawing of your route on plain paper with Xs where the nav aids are will do fine for learning the techniques.

 

Al

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