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brucewtb

Help with setting Vcore on ASUS Hero MB needed

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I have a brand new Haswell system and need some assistance with the ASUS Hero Maximus VI UEFI so I can do some stress testing - particularly on just how you manually change CPU Vcore because when I change the UEFI Vcore option from Auto to Manual there doesn't seem to any way to actually manipulate the voltage.  

What am I missing here?

 

Thanks.

 

Bruceb

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With "Fully Manual Mode" either enabled or disabled, you should just be able to left click and type a "CPU Core Voltage" under the "Extreme Tweaker" tab

 

Maybe make sure the UEFI isn't automatically trying to OC with some pre-programmed settings already.

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With "Fully Manual Mode" either enabled or disabled,

 

 

How do you set "fully manual" in the hero motherboard? I've seen how to do this with the ROG Extreme motherboard elsewhere on the web but not for Hero which disappointingly seems to lack some useful features of the more expensive ROG boards and I'm wondering if this is another.  There is a manual mode but left clicking on that  just brings up the dialogue box options again.  Thanks

 

Bruceb

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OK, still no idea how you manually set Vcore on the Hero mb so I decided to go with Auto and multipliers for all cores at 46, ram voltage 1.65 and speed 2400.  Rebooted and loaded into windows seemed stable so ran the Aida stress test for three hours still stable.  The temps for the different cores varied quite a bit peaking at 90c but mostly high 70s.  However Vcore was from about 1.35 - 1.45 which seems high.  So where to from here still searching for a way to manually set Vcore on my Hero mb?

 

Bruceb

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Auto voltage will always give you higher volts and thus higher temps. Asus have to allow for the chips that didn't do too well in the silicone lottery.

 

I would look for a youtube video pertaining to overclocking your MB. Or why not check out your MB manual that should give you full instructions.

 

 

Failling that, Asus provide an overclocking utility that will automaticaly stress test and overclock. I have used it myself. Stop it before it goes to the max though, as it pushes very high. It's within AI Suite.

 

Turbo V Evo.

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This is a screenshot from the Asus M6E UEFI, the Hero is probably close to the same.

 

You need to change "Fully Manual Mode" to "Enabled" and then you should be able to click on the box for "CPU Core Voltage" and enter a value.  After you enter the value you need to press "Enter" on you keyboard to get the value to take.

 

 

Using any auto OC utility maybe easy, but it is not really the best option.  The best option is OC manually in the UEFI and to enter all voltages manually so the BIOS and/or the OC Utility can not change them up/down as they see fit.

 

Here is a link to the best OC guide you will find for an Asus Z87 motherboard.  It is a lot of reading and Nick certainly has his opinions on things, but it is well worth the time to read it and follow all his directions.  Nick has never steered me wrong in the advise he has given me over the last seven years and he will not post any voltages or speeds that he considers unsafe.

 

On top of that the voltages that he recommends are below the voltages recommended by Asus in their Z87 overclock guides.  Asus and any other overclock guide out there that I have seen tells you that you need higher voltages for a stable OC than you actually do.  Nick's guide shows you how to trim all the voltages and to be able to use the lowest voltages possible for a stable OC.

http://www.simforums.com/forums/haswell-48ghz-on-air-building-a-haswell-system_topic46180.html

 

Following his directions I am at 4.7 GHz / 4400MHz rock solid stable with a vcore of only 1.33 and a CPU cache of only 1.30.

post-153511-0-75528500-1387717385.jpg

post-153511-0-75528500-1387717385.jpg

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Using any auto OC utility maybe easy, but it is not really the best option.  The best option is OC manually in the UEFI and to enter all voltages manually so the BIOS and/or the OC Utility can not change them up/down as they see fit.

 

 

 

That is the conventional wisdom. I've always overclocked via the BIOS. However, I fully intend to give the Asus software a second try soon. When I tried it before, it set my voltage high. And guess what, it was right to do so. I have learnt from testing that my CPU requires high voltage.

 

You can certainly fine tune better yourself, rather than relying on overclocking software, and end up with lower CPU volts, but I feel that many of the auto overclock utilities may have received a bad reputation unfairly. Companies like Asus don't stand still, they continue to improve their software offerings.

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This is a screenshot from the Asus M6E UEFI, the Hero is probably close to the same.

 

You need to change "Fully Manual Mode" to "Enabled" and then you should be able to click on the box for "CPU Core Voltage" and enter a value.

 

 

Thanks but It seems there may be subtle differences in ASUS ROG UEFIs as my ASUS Hero MB UEFI doesn't have the Fully Manual option that appears in this screenshot unless someone can suggest how to get this option displayed. Which still leaves me puzzling how to manually input a fixed value for Vcore on the Hero.  Grateful for any further assistance because unless you can set Vcore I don't see how you can pass go with a manual overclock.

 

Bruceb

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Advanced mode but I think I have it figured now - I had another go at entering a value in CPU core voltage override and got it to work  - thanks. Interestingly ASUS recommends adaptive mode rather than manual for overclocking.

 

Bruceb

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Can be tricky adaptive, from what I understand. I would go for fixed voltage, and then when stable, calculate the off-set and use that.

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Thanks but It seems there may be subtle differences in ASUS ROG UEFIs as my ASUS Hero MB UEFI doesn't have the Fully Manual option that appears in this screenshot unless someone can suggest how to get this option displayed. Which still leaves me puzzling how to manually input a fixed value for Vcore on the Hero.  Grateful for any further assistance because unless you can set Vcore I don't see how you can pass go with a manual overclock.

 

Bruceb

 

As you seem to have figured out you have to be in Advanced Mode to manually overclock.

 

When you start getting into your higher overclocks (4.6, 4.7, 4.8) adaptive mode is not really a good idea.  Adaptive jacks your voltages up without you knowing it.

 

I realize that most people would believe the manufacturer of the motherboard and follow their advise, but in this case I would take what Asus recommends with a grain of salt.

 

I highly suggest that you go read Nick's guide on overclocking an Asus Z87 motherboard.  If you follow his guide you will be able to find the lowest voltages you need to run your overclock stable and those voltages will be lower than the voltages Asus will tell you to use and certainly  are lower than what adaptive mode would apply.

 

You may need a higher vcore than I did or a lower vcore, it depends on the chip lottery.  The only way to get to the lowest stable vcore and cpu cache that you need is to do it all manually.  Lower voltages equals lower temps and those two combined equals longer CPU life!

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Well the ASUS description of adaptive does make some sense at least the way I understood it - sets a maximum value eg 1.2 or whatever but at idle enables the system to run at much lower voltages.  Anyway I'm finding that to run my cpu at 4.6 I need something closer to 1.30 volts and that gives me a cpu temp of about 70 under load.  However still in the experimenting stage and will read NickNs guide.

 

Bruceb

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I highly suggest that you go read Nick's guide on overclocking an Asus Z87 motherboard. If you follow his guide you will be able to find the lowest voltages you need to run your overclock stable and those voltages will be lower than the voltages Asus will tell you to use and certainly are lower than what adaptive mode would apply.

You know what, this is another area where auto overclock utilities, like the Asus version, get an unfair bad wrap. It's perfectly possible to use the voltage recommended by Asus, or the voltage and settings their auto overclock sets... and then go into the UEFI and further fine tune. That way you save time, and still end up with an overclock that's stable at the lowest possible voltage. Using the Asus overclock utility as a "base line" is a viable method.

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You have your opinion and I have mine Martin.

 

How so?

 

If you can enter the UEFI AFTER the auto-overclock utility has done it's thing you can change/tweak any setting you like.

 

Why would you be against that? I'm just curious, in case there's an issue with the approach I haven't considered.

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Even Asus says that it is best to set vcore manually

 

I quote:

"Either way, dialing in an overclock using Manual Vcore to determine how much voltage the processor needs under full load is best -"

 

Here is a link:

http://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?33488-Maximus-VI-Series-UEFI-Guide-for-Overclocking&country=&status=

 

The quote is toward the end.  They do say after you find your vcore manually if you want to use adaptive mode you can, but personally I do not think adaptive mode at high overclocks is a good idea.

 

If you use adaptive mode and your CPU gets hit with AVX instructions sets adaptive mode will increase your vcore by 0.1 without you even knowing about it.  If your CPU gets fully loaded adaptive mode will also increase vcore.

 

If you want to use adaptive mode or use a utility that is fine.  I do not use either and will not.  Regarding a utility, I will enter settings manually so I know that everything is set to what I want.  I am not going to let a utility decide for me what setting is best, especially when going for a high OC.  Running a OC of 4.2 and letting a utility do the work maybe fine, but when I am running a OC of 4.7 I want to know what settings have been changed and I want to know that the settings I changed are not going to get changed without my knowledge.  The 4770K and Z87 motherboards jack up the voltage enough as it is.  My 1.33 vcore under OCCT stress test load is actually 1.36.  If I used adaptive mode it would get jacked up to 1.43.  This is why I think at higher overclocks adaptive mode is a bad idea. 

 

Raja of Asus also states that if you are going to use AVX stress tests (OCCT like I use) then do not use adaptive mode.  If you OC you really should stress test to make sure that your OC is stable and the stress tests that I use are AVX instruction sets.  I know that you do not believe stress tests are necessary Martin, but I do and this is another difference of opinion that we have.

See Raja's post #225 here.

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?286345-ASUS-Z87-Motherboards-Overview-Guides-and-Official-Support&p=5198061&highlight=adaptive+mode#post5198061

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And if it makes you feel better, I clearly have the bottom <10th percentile of 4470k chips.  I couldn't even get 4.2 GHz stable with 1.25+ V (wouldn't blue screen but spontaneously reboot 2-6 hours into stress testing).  Forced to settle at 4.1 GHz at about 1.23 V currently...ouch.  Was hoping for 4.3, would be OK with 4.2, not too happy with 4.1.  Hopefully you get a better clock than that!

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Posted Today, 02:38 PM

 

 

Even Asus says that it is best to set vcore manually

 

I quote:

 

"Either way, dialing in an overclock using Manual Vcore to determine how much voltage the processor needs under full load is best -"

 

Here is a link:

 

http://rog.asus.com/...ountry=&status=

 

The quote is toward the end. They do say after you find your vcore manually if you want to use adaptive mode you can, but personally I do not think adaptive mode at high overclocks is a good idea.

 

If you use adaptive mode and your CPU gets hit with AVX instructions sets adaptive mode will increase your vcore by 0.1 without you even knowing about it. If your CPU gets fully loaded adaptive mode will also increase vcore.

 

If you want to use adaptive mode or use a utility that is fine. I do not use either and will not. Regarding a utility, I will enter settings manually so I know that everything is set to what I want. I am not going to let a utility decide for me what setting is best, especially when going for a high OC. Running a OC of 4.2 and letting a utility do the work maybe fine, but when I am running a OC of 4.7 I want to know what settings have been changed and I want to know that the settings I changed are not going to get changed without my knowledge. The 4770K and Z87 motherboards jack up the voltage enough as it is. My 1.33 vcore under OCCT stress test load is actually 1.36. If I used adaptive mode it would get jacked up to 1.43. This is why I think at higher overclocks adaptive mode is a bad idea.

 

Raja of Asus also states that if you are going to use AVX stress tests (OCCT like I use) then do not use adaptive mode. If you OC you really should stress test to make sure that your OC is stable and the stress tests that I use are AVX instruction sets. I know that you do not believe stress tests are necessary Martin, but I do and this is another difference of opinion that we have.

 

See Raja's post #225 here.

 

http://www.xtremesys...ode#post5198061

 

 

Were you referring to me?

 

That's nothing to do with what I was talking about. :smile:

 

Of course setting CPU voltage manually is a good idea. But that refers to overclocking in general. I'm referring to the use of the Asus overclocking utility in Turbo V Evo. JJ the Asus rep recommends using Turbo V Evo and then using that as a base line for further tweaking, and yes, you can then set the voltage manually. As I said previously, it's a valid technique to use Turbo V Evo and then tweak voltages manually. If you tweak them, you are setting them manually.

 

if you're worried about the utility using adaptive instead of off-set or fixed, then you simply change it to what you require afterwards. As I said, you tweak afterwards. Saves a lot of time and effort. I've never said I favour adaptive, in fact I said the exact opposite.

 

 

 

I know that you do not believe stress tests are necessary Martin, but I do and this is another difference of opinion that we have.

 

 

Sorry but we seem to be on the wrong wavelength. Of course I believe in stress tests. I have overclocked many times, and like you I have done so through the BIOS, and then stress tested thoroughly. If I were to use an overclocking utility in the way I said, then I would tweak voltage manually afterwards, and any other settings I wanted to cghange, and then stress test.

 

Conventional wisdom, is a great thing, but every now and again it's worth testing such wisdom. Clinging to it blindly forever without checking to see if it's still valid is the right way to miss something usefull.

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Were you referring to me?

 

That's nothing to do with what I was talking about. :smile:

 

Sorry but we seem to be on the wrong wavelength. Of course I believe in stress tests.

 

Regarding adaptive mode, no I was not referring to you.

 

Regarding not believing in stress testing, I must be confusing you with someone else on Avsim in a different thread.

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Well I have just been following NickN's UEFI setup and unfortunately for a 4.6 OC with Vcore @ 1.34 I am getting much higher cpu temps with the AIDA stress test than my first OC with Vcore @ auto - was expecting the reverse as Vcore @ auto gave actual Vcore from 1.35-1.45.  So back to the drawing board!

 

Bruceb

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I have never heard of that happening to anyone before.  Did you change all the settings in your BIOS per the guide?

 

Below are the settings I had for 4.6GHz / 4400MHz for my Asus Sabertooth Z87.  Your Hero will have one more setting and that is Eventual CPU Input, this setting is covered in Nick's guide and from a quick review of the guide the value is the same as Initial CPU Input.

 

Your CPU and MB may need more voltage or less voltage than I did, the below is just to give you an idea.  Also the below if for my ram timings, you would need to adjust the below for your ram.

 

Also on the Maximus VI Extreme that I had I had to change to manual overclock before I could get the CPU C State settings to show up under the Advanced tab.

 

For your ROG board you will need to set SVID Control to enabled instead of auto.

 

__________________________________________________________________________

 

Enter the BIOS EXIT MENU and “LOAD OPTIMIZED DEFAULTS”

__________________________________________________________________________

 

BOOT MENU:

FAST BOOT: DISABLED

BOOT LOGO DISPLAY: DISABLED
POST REPORT: 5 SEC

SETUP MODE: ADVANCED MODE

BOOT OPTION PRIORITIES: SET AS REQUIRED

__________________________________________________________________________

 

MONITOR MENU:
ANTI SURGE SUPPORT: DISABLED
__________________________________________________________________________

ADVANCED MENU:

 

ADVANCED MENU > CPU CONFIGURATION MENU:
HYPER THREADING: DISABLED
 

CPU CONFIGURATION > CPU POWER MANAGEMENT CONFIGURATION MENU:

EIST: DISABLED
TURBO MODE: ENABLED
 

CPU C STATES: ENABLED
ENHANCED C1: DISABLED
CPU C3 REPORT: ENABLED
CPU C6 REPORT: DISABLED
C6 LATENCY: SHORT
CPU C7 REPORT: DISABLED
C7 LATENCY: LONG
PACKAGE C STATE SUPPORT: C3

===============

 

ADVANCED MENU > PCH CONFIGURATION MENU:
PCH CONFIGURATION > PCI EXPRESS CONFIGURATION MENU:

DMI LINK ASPM CONTROL: DISABLED

ASPM SUPPORT: DISABLED

PCIE SPEED: AUTO
===============

 

ADVANCED MENU > SATA CONFIGURATION MENU:

SATA MODE SELECTION: AHCI

===============

 

ADVANCED MENU > SYSTEM AGENT CONFIGURATION MENU:

CPU AUDIO DEVICE: DISABLED

SYSTEM AGENT CONFIGURATION > NB PCIE CONFIGURATION MENU:
Verified PCIe slot the card is installed into displays: X16 and the LINK SPEED is set to GEN3 for the 780

DMI LINK ASPM CONTROL: DISABLED
PEG ASPM: DISABLED

SYSTEM AGENT CONFIGURATION > GRAPHICS CONFIGURATION MENU:
PRIMARY DISPLAY: PCIE
IGPU MULTI-MONITOR: DISABLED

SYSTEM AGENT CONFIGURATION > MEMORY CONFIGURATION MENU:
MEMORY SCRAMBLER: ENABLED
MEMORY REMAP: ENABLED

================

 

ADVANCED MENU > ONBOARD DEVICE CONFIGURATION MENU:

Set as required

__________________________________________________________________________

 

AI TWEAKER MENU:

AI OVER CLOCK TUNER: XMP (Profile #1)
CPU STRAP: 100
BCLK FREQUENCY: 100

CPU CORE RATIO: PER CORE
Each core set to: 46

MIN CPU CACHE: 44
MAX CPU CACHE: 44

DRAM FREQUENCY: 2400MHz

CPU CORE VOLTAGE: MANUAL MODE
CPU CORE VOLTAGE OVERRIDE: 1.30

CPU CACHE VOLTAGE: MANUAL MODE
CPU CACHE VOLTAGE OVERRIDE: 1.30

CPU SYSTEM AGENT OFFSET MODE SIGN: +
CPU SYSTEM AGENT VOLTAGE OFFSET: 0.300

CPU ANALOG I/O VOLTAGE OFFSET SIGN: +
CPU ANALOG I/O VOLTAGE OFFSET: 0.050

CPU DIGITAL I/O VOLTAGE OFFSET SIGN: +
CPU DIGITAL I/O VOLTAGE OFFSET: 0.100

SVID CONTROL: AUTO

CPU INPUT VOLTAGE: 1.88

DRAM VOLTAGE: 1.65

CPU SPREAD SPECTRUM: DISABLED
 

AI TWEAKER MENU > DRAM TIMING CONTROL MENU:

Verify Memory Timings (Change as required): 9-11-11-31-1T

AI TWEAKER MENU > DIGI+POWER CONTROL MENU:
LOAD LINE CALIBRATION: 8
CPU POWER PHASE CONTROL: OPTIMIZED

AI TWEAKER MENU > CPU POWER MANAGEMENT MENU:
ENHANCED INTEL SPEEDSTEP: DISABLED
TURBO MODE: ENABLED

_________________________________________________________________________

 

F10 & SAVE

 

After reboot go back into BIOS and confirm all settings

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Well I have just been following NickN's UEFI setup and unfortunately for a 4.6 OC with Vcore @ 1.34 I am getting much higher cpu temps with the AIDA stress test than my first OC with Vcore @ auto - was expecting the reverse as Vcore @ auto gave actual Vcore from 1.35-1.45.  So back to the drawing board!

 

Bruceb

Hope you have sufficient cooling for those kind of voltages!!

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Hope you have sufficient cooling for those kind of voltages!!

Well it would seem so (Corsair H90) as I was getting lower temps when the voltage was set to Auto and the actual voltage varied from about 1.35 - 1.45 during the AIDA stress test which was stable for three hours. One other thing, ASUS recommends a maximum Vcore of 1.275- 1.280 at any multiplier a lot less than is in Nicks guide.  I'm about to fly over the ditch to NZ to catch with my son and 3.5 year old grand-daughter, but will get back to this when I return in a few weeks time.  Thanks to all for your input and best wishes for Christmas and the new year.

 

Bruceb

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