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ryanbatcund

What is going on with my system?

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Since early this year, when my son shocked my case about 20 times, over the course of a few days, nothing has been the same.  I think the static has/is really wreaking havoc on my components but now it seems to be showing up with issues.

 

Here's what I've experienced in the past few months:

 

PC rebooting when static discharged on case

Black screen after windows boot logo

"Display driver stopped working" nvidia CTD error

Overclock failing, having to go back to 4.2 GHz and lower vcore

BIOS not saving settings (presumably a hardware failure because my OC was actually lost in between SSD installations)

This new weird DX error (pic) - happened tonight while playing BF4 - sudden freeze followed by real jerky mouse motion
DXerror.jpg
 
These are all BAD things - what do you guys think?  Did the static screw up my components?

 

 


|Ryan Butterworth|

| i7 4790K@4.4GHz | 32GB RAM | EVGA GTX 1080Ti | ASUS Z97-Pro | 1TB 860 Evo | 500GB 840 Evo Win10 Pro | 1TB Samsung 7200rpm | Seasonic X750W |

 

 

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What does your motherboard tell you?

 

All motherboards have a bunch of onboard led's for various components to let you know what's working and what's not. eg VGA led for graphics card, CPU led and memory led (refer to your motherboards documentation for a description and location of these leds) . If your computer crashes or doesn't start one of these led's may be lit red which is going to help ID any probable cause.

 

Of course, my case has a see through panel which makes checking the MB easy, you may need to remove the side panel to check yours.

 

I had a problem a couple of weeks ago where the PC wouldn't start up (leading up to this were occasional "Display driver stopped working" messages). The VGA_led was red which indicated the graphics card was the issue. Turns out that the graphics card was a bit saggy in the motherboard so I propped up the corner with an old paintbrush and haven't had a problem since (except for my expensive Logitech mouse which seems to have worn out the left click button, note to self: Don't buy Logitech ever again).


www.antsairplanes.com

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Get a static band and discharge any remaining static. Essentially grounding the PC. Looks like a repair or reformat may be an order (OS)


David Graham, Network+, Cisco CSE, Cisco Unity Support Specialist, A+, CCNA

 

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I just did this though.... Literally wiped my main drives and reinstalled windows.

 

I've gotten the black screen on boot with three different drives.

 

The DX error on bf4 was last night as well.

 

I'll check the LCD but I'm not sure my board has one. It does have some green yellow red led lights though.


|Ryan Butterworth|

| i7 4790K@4.4GHz | 32GB RAM | EVGA GTX 1080Ti | ASUS Z97-Pro | 1TB 860 Evo | 500GB 840 Evo Win10 Pro | 1TB Samsung 7200rpm | Seasonic X750W |

 

 

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What are you temps like?


Something on your mobo could have bit the dust as well. If your temps are good, and you've reformatted and used different drives. Unfortunately that could be the culprit.


Also, try clean booting, removing all components IE gpu, anything usb PCIE other than mouse and keyboard. Slowly add pieces back. 


David Graham, Network+, Cisco CSE, Cisco Unity Support Specialist, A+, CCNA

 

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Ryan... static can cause reboots, it can also scramble your bios.

 

It's usually caused by the enclosure.

 

Your PSU has a three pin plug of course, so the enclosure should be grounded through that.

 

It's usually because the PC enclosures panels aren't grounded properly. I know some models of Antec case have had this issue. Some attach grounding wires to bypass any plastic panels sandwiched between metal.

 

Before you freak out and buy new components, do try a different enclosure. If the enclosure isn't properly designed, properly grounded, then rather than a Faraday cage effect occurring, with the static traveling around the enclosure, it will instead affect your components.

 

It might also be worth testing the mains socket to make sure your mains socket is properly earthed. If it's not, the PSU won't be either, and neither will the PC enclosure.

 

In the UK we can get plug in testers, I assume you can in the US

 

Something else to check, is that you haven't accidentally left a motherboard standoff in place, that shouldn't be there. This can act as a path for static.

 

You can run an grounding wire from the enclosures metal panel to a suitable earth point, like a radiator pipe for example. Hear in the UK, all our water pipes are cross bonded, grounded directly to the earth terminal at the consumer unit. I would imagine it's the same in the US.

 

Finally, last but not least, do check all of your cable connections, and check for damaged insulation that might be touching the metal case.

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Yeah I checked all that back in early 2014... Main outlets are properly grounded, no missing standoffs, no damaged cables. You'd think a 200 USD corsair case would be ok... Wonder if it has something to do with the pass through USB 3 cables (650d doesn't have mobo headers).

 

Today I got another interesting message. First my PC simply shut down in the middle of internet browsing. When I pushed the power button to turn it on Windows said "battery has reached a critical level".... Something about recharge or plug in your PC to an outlet lol! I'm not connected to my battery backup anymore and haven't been for a long time. Anyway it appeared PC was hibernating because my web page was still there.


|Ryan Butterworth|

| i7 4790K@4.4GHz | 32GB RAM | EVGA GTX 1080Ti | ASUS Z97-Pro | 1TB 860 Evo | 500GB 840 Evo Win10 Pro | 1TB Samsung 7200rpm | Seasonic X750W |

 

 

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Here's something interesting....

 

Though my PSU wasn't connected to the battery backup (which probably has a debate-able battery since early this year) my USB cable WAS connected to the backup.  Explains why I have power options for "on battery"

 

Wonder if that was a contributing factor as to why my PC wasn't booting sometimes....  maybe Windows detected a critical battery level and was trying to hibernate right as Windows tried to load.


|Ryan Butterworth|

| i7 4790K@4.4GHz | 32GB RAM | EVGA GTX 1080Ti | ASUS Z97-Pro | 1TB 860 Evo | 500GB 840 Evo Win10 Pro | 1TB Samsung 7200rpm | Seasonic X750W |

 

 

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Yeah I checked all that back in early 2014... Main outlets are properly grounded, no missing standoffs, no damaged cables. You'd think a 200 USD corsair case would be ok... Wonder if it has something to do with the pass through USB 3 cables (650d doesn't have mobo headers).

 

Today I got another interesting message. First my PC simply shut down in the middle of internet browsing. When I pushed the power button to turn it on Windows said "battery has reached a critical level".... Something about recharge or plug in your PC to an outlet lol! I'm not connected to my battery backup anymore and haven't been for a long time. Anyway it appeared PC was hibernating because my web page was still there.

 

 

No missing standoffs, you say, but what about an extra standoff that shouldn't be there?

 

Clearly you were having a static issue in regard to lack of grounding, or your PC would not have been rebooting upon static discharge. I think we can be quite definitive regarding that.

 

What can happen is that the BIOS gets corrupted, so have you tried reflashing the BIOS?

 

I would say it's not so much the fact that you HAD a static issue, but that you are now dealing with the aftermath.

 

 

Wonder if it has something to do with the pass through USB 3 cables (650d doesn't have mobo headers).

 

Yes it certainly could be. I have come across static issues from USB cables before. USB ground faults do occur.

 

http://www.tomshardware.com/answers/id-1635041/static-discharge-usb-port-restarts.html

 

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/271300-28-front-panel-static-discharge-problems

 

http://www.avsforum.com/t/805677/antec-fusion-static-causes-reboots-freezes

 

http://www.pchelpforum.com/threads/touching-my-computer-sometimes-makes-it-restart.102493/

 

 

You'd think a 200 USD corsair case would be ok.

 

 

Here's someone else with a 650D with the same issue as you...

 

http://forum.corsair.com/v3/showthread.php?t=126587

 

And another with a Corsiar 650D with the same problem...

 

http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum/384126-31-static-discharge-freezes-computer

 

Which panel on the case was touched, that caused the reboots?

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Huh interesting. I did post at Corsair forums a long time ago and I was the only guy - but then another dude had an issue... Looks like it might be a quality control problem.

 

Mainly when shocked on the front panel near the USB / sound ports....

 

Here's my post - they really wanted me to run outside of the case... That's totally not feasible...

http://forum.corsair.com/v3/showthread.php?t=126141


|Ryan Butterworth|

| i7 4790K@4.4GHz | 32GB RAM | EVGA GTX 1080Ti | ASUS Z97-Pro | 1TB 860 Evo | 500GB 840 Evo Win10 Pro | 1TB Samsung 7200rpm | Seasonic X750W |

 

 

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Front panel... yep, that's exactly what occurs with the Antec cases. The front panel being the issue.

 

In the case of Antec enclosures, I believe some guys run a wire from the panel to a point on the enclosure that has a direct metallic path to the PSU screws.

 

Basically the front panel isn't grounded properly, so is isolated from the rest of the chassis and thus PSU screws. It's the PSU of course that grounds your 650D.

 

You could attach a wire from the front panel, and run it straight to the screws that attach your PSU to the enclosure. That way you would know the front panel was grounded. Which ever is easiest really, and within your DIY capabilities.

 

Of course, even if properly grounded, you still may have issues from previous static discharges to deal with, so if it were me I would flash the BIOS.

 

Given that PC enclosures aren't that expensive these days, buying a new one would be worth it.

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