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Guest cw1011

Does this seem real to you!?

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So did I when I first saw it.Supposedly taken from an aircraft flying directly overhead the runway while the aircraft taking off went into a rather steep climb.I suppose it's possible, but I'd think overflight of light aircraft would not be allowed during flight ops at low altitude...

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Yep, was also my thinking that it wouldn't be allowed, especially for such a steep climb of an 747.And why do you think it's not - since you said "so did I when I first saw it"??But check few details: model itself, especially lead flaps. They look kinda edgy.

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Hmmm, looks fake to me, the scale of the 747 to the size of the runway looks way off.Dan.

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You think 747 is too small?

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Yeah, looks way to small, either that or thats one big-#### 7 on the RWY LOLAlso the centre lines are nearly as wide as the enginesDan.

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I just noticed this weird shadow. If it's in such steep climb and basically so far as it seems from the runway, and I don't think lens perspective are changing this, what's this huuuuuuuuuuuge shadow on the runway doing?? :)

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It certainly doesn't look real to me. It strikes me as too sharp, too in focus. The leading edge flaps are in as sharp focus as the runway markings. Even with a small aperture I don't think the depth of field would be as good as this and no sign of any camera movement.........unless the taker had the camera mounted on a tripod and the 747 flew through its legs.....still, I'd be happy to be proved wrong!

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I think its a real picture.If you actually check out the photos that the photographer has taken (clicking on his name on that picture link for example) you will see they are of very high quality and he also has taken quite a few aerial shots. He obviously due to the amount of pictures he has taken and the quality of them must do this for a living and also have very good high quality equipment.Craig

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it's real allright.if you check his name,you'll see there's more then one picture of this particular aircraft climbing out.he has many more shots made out of an overhead cessna.cheers

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I know Sam, and its real alright...Hes a very talented photographerSteve Brown

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And also, having a little GA plane in a position like that to take such a picture is not uncommon. If you've ever done a "Bay Tour" over San Francisco, you would find yourself at one point in perfect position to take such a picture as you follow the Bayshore freeway past SFO's 28L/R departure ends. The tower realizes that there is no way that a jumbo jet taking off could make your altitude in that distance and will often clear aircraft for takeoff while your little plane is still crossing the runway centerline. Also realize that when a jet rotates for takeoff, they will often pitch up to 14-18 degrees nose up atttitude, making a takeoff still photo look like a steep climbout while the actually flightpath may only be a 3-5 degrees climb gradient.

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Looks bogus to me. But I did look at the guys other work, which is real enough. Man, that plane gets around...just looking at the other pics of her, this one flies regularly to Manchester, Amsterdam, Melbourne, Sydney, Zurich and Los Angeles (and back to Singapore!).Having been to Singapore a few times, I know its FAARRR Far away from most of these spots. Takes 23 hours of air travel to get from KATL to WSSS. (ATL is my home)Eric

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Sam Chui would never post a fake shot. I think its strange that you guys dont believe that this shot was taken from a Cessna, passing 3000 feet over LAX..

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Well, I never heard of Sam Chui. I never look at who took the shot when I go to airliners.net. (no disrespect, I just havent up to now.) second, you have to admit thats a highly highly unusual attitude to take a picture from in this day of ultra high FAA security in the USA. Also the picture looks just a little too perfect. I say that as a tribute to Mr. Chui, not a criticism.Eric

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It is extremely common to have either a VFR corridor over or to be vectored right over the top of a primary class B airport while flying VFR. I don

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Sometimes we think something is fake becasue it does not quite fit into our expectations, but what if our expecations are not quite accurate, especially when coloured by the unreal world of FS2004?I personally know several of the photographers on airliners.net and they are not in the business of faking shots, but let's put that to one side.For example, one basis on which this is deemed a fake is that a small plane would not be allowed to overfly a major international airport. I am sure that is said without the benefit of firsthand knowledge of flying a real plane. Just like other folks that have posted above, I have also been vectored over an Intl airport (at 2000) with heavies taking off and landing underneath me. That is the safest way to do it - pre and post 9/11.The other thing said is because of the "steep climb". The body angle of the B747 is steep, but I can guarantee you the climb isn't steep - at almost 400 ton it's not a jet fighter. Remember he said they were at 3500, there is no way the photographer's plane is in the 74's way. It will be several miles from the airport before it reaches 3500 feet!So that leaves things like size and perspective, well that's for each one to decide but it is taken from 3500 feet away (no doubt with one of those 10,000 dollar telephoto lenses) so there may be a slight amount of distortion but not overly so.

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Ooops, sorry for posting into wrong forum, I forgot this is basically off topic :)Well, thank you everyonr for many replies.I'm still not convinced that this photo is a real one, but it might be and if it really is, than my hat down to the maker, becuase then it's a really great shot and really awesome quality.

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That's what removed my doubts too, the name of the photographer.I doubt he'd post fake shots.If it were almost anyone else I'd not believe them still I think.And to people saying it's common to have light aircraft overflying airports and runways while operations are underway: maybe it is in the US but at Schiphol it's rare. Once in a while a trainer from Martinair or KLM flight schools will get permission for a familiarisation flight but they have to stay well clear of the active runways and never come directly overhead at any altitude. That happens maybe once a day at most...Apart from that, the airspace is closed for some 15nm around the airport to all light aircraft except those arriving and departing for which a separate runway is set aside (the 04-22).

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A few light aircraft use the main runways at Manchester International Airport in England, although I can't remember if I have seen one of these small planes flying over the runways when a large jet is taking off.Chris Low.

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I am impressed with Mr. Chui's photographs and contributions to airliners.net and have admired his work for a while. However, the folks who were questioning this picture's authenticity prompted me to really study its details. I've looked at how the shadows on the plane are consistent with the appearance of the shadow on the ground and am convinced that all is above board in that regard. One nagging little question still haunts me.At the top of the photo, I see two small objects on either side of the runway that may be signs indicating distance-remaining or other types of markers. They may not protrude from the ground at all, and if anyone can identify them and relate how they sit in relation to the ground, I would appreciate it. If they do protrude vertically from the ground, it would seem as though the shadows they cast are, while from a similar azimuth, perhaps not from the same time of day. However, I do not have much experience watching how an airplane casts its shadow from an airborne perspective (regretfully :-) ) and may be simply wrong in how I am positioning the sun in relation to this picture in my mind. As I stated before, if these two objects are flush with the ground, this is a moot question. Any thoughts?KevinEDIT: spelling

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Maybe it's my "tired old eyes" but I cannot see much of a heat trail distorting the ultra sharp lines of the background...I would have thought the PIC would be giving it plenty of "welly" at this point and a long shimmering trail of hot gasses would be visible in this mega clear photo.As I said...maybe my glasses need retuning! :-roll

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Those are distance markers and they stand vertically. The sun is coming from the aircraft's high 10-11 o'clock. The shadow of the aircraft appears ahead of the aircraft due to the fact that it is a high sun which means the shadow is not too far away from the plane's position and that he is most likely using a telephoto lens shooting from several thousand feet above it, thereby capturing both plane and shadow, with the shadow falling ahead of the plane from his perspective, as the 747 climbs.

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Kevin,That brings things together for me very nicely. Thank you.Happy flying,Kevin

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Yeah, get some new glasses. Between the #1 engine and wing, you can see the heat distortion practically wipe out two skid marks on the runway from view, compare the grass behind the wing and ahead of the wing just outboard of the #4 engine and you can see the distortion behind, for the #3 engine, you can see the line of black caulking on the runway edge get distorted as it goes between the engine and leading edge of the wing and slightly distorted aft of the wing.

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