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Driver170

MEL request

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Does anyone know where i can locate what the figures mean and letters? for example you have B and 1,2,3 etc

 

Have a look at the header  :wink:

 

A/B/C/D is a sequence letter. From what I can tell, A is first addition, B is first revision, C is second revision, and so on.

The next number is the number installed in the aircraft.

The next number is the number required to dispatch the aircraft.

The next bit contains any remarks.

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Cheers kyle but what is the revision?

 

Not sure what you mean. A revision is a change.

 

And (M) (O) ?

 

(M) - Maintenance... ;or

(O) - Operations...

 

...procedures

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Right, ok, if you have (M) next to it or (O) what does it mean?

 

(M) is a procedure that must be accomplished my maintenance.  If specified, certain (M) items may be accomplished by the flight crew.

 

(O) are operational procedures to be accomplished by the flight crew.

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Has anyone got a link to the Boeing original copy of the MEL?

 

If they do, they shouldn't post it here...

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As Kyle pointed out, for the other items, the column headers describe the sections (Number installed, number of dispatch, remarks, etc). There is no column header for the A, B, C or D but those four letters are standard symbols for repair intervals, so they appear to relate to the repair time interval (i.e. the time period that you are allowed to continue operating the aircraft with the fault. After this time the MEL allowance has expired, the aircraft is considered "not airworthy" and the fault must be repaired before further flight is allowed). 

 

Officially the ICAO "Master Minimum Equipment List/ Minimum Equipment List Policy and Procedures Manual" (Googled and can be found here) states the following:

  • Category A Items in this category shall be repaired within the time interval specified in the “Remarks or Exceptions” column of the operator's approved MEL. Whenever the proviso in the “Remarks or Exceptions” column of the MMEL states cycles or flight time, the time interval begins with the next flight. Whenever the time interval is listed as flight days, the time interval begins on the flight day following the day of discovery.
  • Category B Items in this category shall be repaired within 3 consecutive calendar days excluding the day of discovery.
  • Category C Items in this category shall be repaired within 10 consecutive calendar days, excluding the day of discovery.
  • Category D Items in this category shall be repaired within 120 consecutive calendar days, excluding the day of discovery. To be considered for placement in Category D, the item must be of an optional nature, or excess equipment which an operator may, at his/her discretion, deactivate, remove from or install on an aircraft. To be approved for Category D, the item must meet the following criteria:
  1. The absence of the item does not affect crew workload;
  2. The pilots do not rely on the function of that item on a routine or continuous basis; and,
  3. The pilot's training, subsequent habit patterns and procedures do not rely on the use of that item.

 

And for (M) and (O):

(O) Items 

  1. Aircraft with inoperative equipment requiring an operating procedure may be returned to service following completion of the required MEL procedure for deferral. 
  2. Operating procedures are normally carried out by qualified flight or cabin crew, but may be accomplished by other qualified, approved personnel. 

(M) Items 

  1. Aircraft with inoperative equipment requiring a maintenance procedure may be returned to service following completion of the required MEL procedure for deferral. 
  2. Maintenance procedures are normally accomplished by maintenance personnel, but some elementary maintenance tasks may be carried out by crew members or other qualified, approved personnel (See Section 3.15.2). 
  3. Air crews may not perform maintenance procedures if the defect involves an item designated in the MEL with a (M#) - Maintenance Personnel Required. In this circumstance, the aircraft may not proceed until authorized maintenance personnel carry out the specified procedure (Not all MMELs use the annotation M#)

[Section 3.15.2 doesn't really specify clearly what is considered "elementary maintenance tasks" but from experience that usually includes items such as pulling circuit breakers or any other item that the crew have received training for. It doesn't usually include things you require tools for like opening panels/cowling, etc]

 

As an alternative, when searching for the ICAO definitions, the FAA MMEL Policy Letter concerning definitions (May 11, 2015 and found here) states:

24. Repair Category.  All users of an MEL approved under parts 91K121125129135, and 142 must effect repairs of inoperative instrument and equipment items, deferred in accordance with the MEL, at or prior to the repair times established by the following letter designators.  Part 91 MEL users (D095/D195 LOAs) are not required to comply with the repair categories, but will comply with any provisos defining a repair interval (flights, flight legs, cycles, hours, etc):
  • Repair Category A.  This category item must be repaired within the time interval specified in the “Remarks or Exceptions” column of the aircraft operator’s approved MEL.  For time intervals specified in “calendar days” or “flight days”, the day the malfunction was recorded in the aircraft maintenance record/logbook is excluded.  For all other time intervals (i.e., flights, flight legs, cycles, hors, etc.), repair tracking begins at the point when the malfunction is deferred in accordance with the operator’s approved MEL.
  • Repair Category B.  This category item must be repaired within 3 consecutive calendar-days (72 hours) excluding the day the malfunction was recorded in the aircraft maintenance record/logbook.  For example, if it were recorded at 10 a.m. on January 26th, the 3-day interval would begin at midnight the 26th and end at midnight the 29th.
  • Repair Category C.  This category item must be repaired within 10 consecutive calendar-days (240 hours) excluding the day the malfunction was recorded in the aircraft maintenance record/logbook.  For example, if it were recorded at 10 a.m. on January 26th, the 10-day interval would begin at midnight the 26th and end at midnight February 5th.
  • Repair Category D.  This category item must be repaired within 120 consecutive calendar-days (2880 hours) excluding the day the malfunction was recorded in the aircraft maintenance record/logbook.

 

And for (M) and (O): 

  • (M).  This symbol indicates a requirement for a specific maintenance procedure which must be accomplished prior to operation with the listed item inoperative.  Normally, these procedures are accomplished by maintenance personnel; however, other personnel may be qualified and authorized to perform certain functions.  Procedures requiring specialized knowledge or skill, or requiring the use of tools or test equipment, should be accomplished by maintenance personnel.  The satisfactory accomplishment of all maintenance procedures, regardless of who performs them, is the responsibility of the aircraft operator.  Appropriate procedures are required to be produced as part of the aircraft operator’s manual or MEL.   
  • (O). This symbol indicates a requirement for a specific operations procedure which must be accomplished in planning for and/or operating with the listed item inoperative.  Normally, these procedures are accomplished by the flightcrew; however, other personnel may be qualified and authorized to perform certain functions.  The satisfactory accomplishment of all procedures, regardless of who performs them, is the responsibility of the aircraft operator.  Appropriate procedures are required to be produced as a part of the aircraft operator’s manual or MEL.

 

As you can see, despite the differences between many countries on their air law MEL, definitions have remained fairly consistent to the ICAO definitions. The Australian CASA definitions are the same (if not worded slightly differently).

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Has anyone got a link to the Boeing original copy of the MEL?

There's no such thing as the Boeing 'original'. The MMEL (Master MEL) approved and published by the FAA (or other certifying authority) is produced in conjunction with the aircraft manufacture. After that each operator utilizes the MMEL to produce a MEL applicable to themselves and equipment...then that gets approved by the authority once again.

 

...and once again have to emphasize the difference between (M) and (M#). (M) may be a 'maintenance action' but it's something accomplished by flight crews. Only (M#) actions require a maintenance release.

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