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ivatt

A Stupid Bearings Question For An Old Wrinkly

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After several years of dipping my toe in and out of FSX I have decided at the gentle age of 75 to try and master FSX. Previous attempts have been mixed and I have got bogged won with installing various aircraft that look interesting and doing quick hop skip and a jump with them.

 

To this end I have persuaded one of the family to buy me MS Flight Simulator For Pilots by Wiley Publishing for Christmas having read several posts etc. saying what a good book it is to learn to actually fly with FSX beside it's qualities for teaching would be pilots in the safe environment of FSX.

 

I am looking at Chapter 1 which deals with Post Mills (Vermont) using a PIper J-3 Cub which has very limited instrumentation which is my first problem as it relies heavily on visual to actually see where you are in relation with the ground. Piper Mills has no real distinctive features like a large airport so is difficult to spot in the distance.

 

The hat switch is set to pan which is fine but what would be the best view to have in order to look down to check the ground.

 

The take off runway is 22-220 (being the other end of runway 4) and that's no problem however here my old brain is getting confused. If I take of with a heading of 22-220 which I believe is a SW setting and do a short flight with a few twists and turns which heading do I need to be on in order to land back at the same runway. 

 

 

Your patience is much appreciated.

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Hi! Not a stupid question at all - everyone has to start somewhere. I was lucky to have learned to fly in the real world and flying is a bit like riding a bicycle, once learned you don't forget! So it wasn't too difficult for me to transfer those skills over to a computer simulation. However,I can understand that learning to fly in FSX with no real world piloting experience must be a bit of a challenge!

 

I know it might sound like cheating, but one of the best views to check the ground (and the scenery) is the spot view, where you are actually viewing the aircraft from the outside. You can also use your hat switch in this mode to change your viewing angle and indeed you can zoom in and out to get a more panoramic view of the ground if you wish. If you have done a short flight with a few twists and turns and are 'lost', panning around in the spot view is also a good way to perhaps identify the site of the airfield. If you take off on runway 22 (presumably into the prevailing wind at the time), you would also normally land on 22, unless the wind is calm, in which case you would have the option to land on 04. Although the heading you would need to be on to get back to the airfield will depend on the direction of your twists and turns after take off, once you identify the airfield, you will need to decide which runway you are going to use for landing - if you are going to land on runway 22, then you should position yourself to fly a downwind leg (parallel to runway 22) on a heading of 040, usually at an altitude of about 800-1000ft above the airfield, before making a 90 degree turn onto the base leg where you will begin your descent. A further 90 degree turn will take you onto your final approach heading of 220. The default GPS can of course also be invaluable in helping you identify where you are in relation to the airfield!

Of course with FSX, you don't necessarily have to stick with the airfield recommended in the manual. You could practice at an airfield with more distinctive features (or even live dangerously and fly your J-3 out of a major airport with plenty of landmarks such as SFO or BOS!). I would however suggest you try not to get too bogged down in minutiae at this stage - once you have mastered the basics of flight and can take off, climb, fly reasonably straight and level, descend and land, then the FSX world really is your oyster to enjoy as you wish.

Bill

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In real world flying you would be using maps then you would keep a log of , Headings , Airspeed , and Time .

Taken together it will give you an idea of approxiamately where you are , then you would be able to work out the

direction back to the airport.

 

In the flight simulator use the GPS unit , most aircraft have one , and it is an ideal replacement for maps ,

Once you get used to using the GPS you will find it is a great way  to find and fly back to your airport ,

then when back at the airport zoom in on the GPS and you will get your airport runway layout ,

having that makes the circuit work and approaches much easier to do.

 

In the real world cheating is standard practise , ie; if there is any instrument that provides information to the

pilot , and thereby increases safety then you are obligated to "cheat" and use that instrument.

 

Cheers

Karol

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.................  The take off runway is 22-220 (being the other end of runway 4) and that's no problem however here my old brain is getting confused. If I take of with a heading of 22-220 which I believe is a SW setting and do a short flight with a few twists and turns which heading do I need to be on in order to land back at the same runway. 

 

Your patience is much appreciated.

 

Hello, ivatt,

 

This is a pretty simple problem to address. And, this is certainly not a "stupid question" at all.

 

When I started flying, my instructor taught me how to identify how to fly back to the airport by use of ground references. After I could navigate visually, we went on to learn how to use our avionics to get back to the airport. He would point out ground references that were large enough to get a primary bearing to work with. Then, pick other items that helped in "Positional Awareness" with reference to the airport.

 

There is a lake located just to the east of 2B9 (Post Mills Airport). You can use this lake as your primary point of reference.

 

If you takeoff from Runway 22, make a left departure and fly to the lake to do your air work. When you are done, and while in proximity of the lake, just fly west from the lake back to the airport. There is a road from the lake to a highway that runs north to south just west of the airport. You can fly IFR (I Follow Roads) from the lake to the airport until you get used to the surrounding area and learn ground reference items in relation to the airport. FSX is pretty good at showing roads around an area.

 

Here is a small map showing the lake, the roads, and the airport (Identified by the Blue Star):

 

2B9.jpg

 

Time how long it takes to get to the lake for a reference, and you will know that it takes about the same amount of time to fly back to the air field. If you leave the lake, don't see 2B9 in about the same amount of time, and you see Lake Champlain, you went too far too long. 

 

Here is a link to a Sectional Chart of the area around 2B9:      http://vfrmap.com/?type=vfrc&lat=43.884&lon=-72.252&zoom=10

 

This chart will show you where 2B9 is in relation to everything else around it. You will find Post Mills Airport (2B9) just north of Hanover.

 

Once you have flown using this simple technique, you can expand your flights out as you learn what to look for on the ground as visual references back to the airport. You can always use the lake as a frame of reference to fly back to the airport.

 

When you learn to use your VOR to navigate, 2B9 is located using the LEB VOR 113.7 frequency, on the 008 degree radial, 12.4 DME distance.

 

I sure hope this helps.

 

Cheers,

 

Jim

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Thank you very much for all the helpful replies which I am starting to put into effect, and for making feel I am not completely brain dead.

 

Have managed to find my way back to the airfield a couple of times and nearly got to approach the runway correctly (glad I wasn't a passenger)!! Using visual markers has been a great help as also not being afraid to use GPS when I lose my bearings

 

I have used the spot view with the hat button to look around, just have to make sure I do gentle adjustments so I don't lose perspective.

 

Now to work out which additional view to have open so that I can keep a check on my height.

 

I have decided that patience is the watch word so will keep going over the same flight until I have completely mastered it rather than being tempted to run before I can walk.

 

Thanks again from a grateful old wrinkly

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I'm no pilot, but to be honest, from what I do know, when it comes to visual flying you need visual references.  Things that don't exist in the sim.  A lot of visual approaches call for using buildings and roads as waypoints.  Those aren't modeled real well if at all in FS.  It's gotten better, but one I know of here uses Honeywell as a reference point to turn to base.  Good luck finding a place like that with generic autogen, lol. 

 

As you fly visual approaches to certain airports you will remember what things to look for in the game.  In reality though, the GPS and other navaids are a must.  I don't like using spot view unless I'm just cruising and looking at the plane.  I prefer to stay inside for the actual flying. 

 

I flew a circle to land for the first time into KASE (Aspen, CO) last weekend.  I've never done that before and had no idea when I should turn.  I ended up too high and hot and I had to go missed and made it on my second attempt.  I watched a video of a real circle to land into KASE and my approach was darn near the same.  I noticed in the video that the road provided a sort of guide to the runway as it curves past the airport.  I'm gonna look next time for that road in the sim.  It helps to have proper landclass and ground scenery too.

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Orlaam, on 07 Jan 2016 - 10:44 AM, said:

 

I'm no pilot, but to be honest, from what I do know, when it comes to visual flying you need visual references. Things that don't exist in the sim. A lot of visual approaches call for using buildings and roads as waypoints. Those aren't modeled real well if at all in FS. It's gotten better, but one I know of here uses Honeywell as a reference point to turn to base. Good luck finding a place like that with generic autogen, lol.

 

As you fly visual approaches to certain airports you will remember what things to look for in the game. In reality though, the GPS and other navaids are a must. I don't like using spot view unless I'm just cruising and looking at the plane. I prefer to stay inside for the actual flying.

 

I flew a circle to land for the first time into KASE (Aspen, CO) last weekend. I've never done that before and had no idea when I should turn. I ended up too high and hot and I had to go missed and made it on my second attempt. I watched a video of a real circle to land into KASE and my approach was darn near the same. I noticed in the video that the road provided a sort of guide to the runway as it curves past the airport. I'm gonna look next time for that road in the sim. It helps to have proper landclass and ground scenery too.

Hi, Chris,

 

You make some great points.

 

I use FTX Global and Vector and they have really increased the realism of the positioning of roads. When I am flying in a new area, part of my overall preview will be where several integral roads and major landmarks are in relation to the airport.

 

Flying into Aspen is a challenge. Especially for the first time. And can be made more difficult by performing a visual approach instead of using an instrument approach for vertical descent guidance. The distance from the top of the mountains to the runway is visually deceiving. You think everything looks just fine, but then, too late you realize you are too fast and too high. Speed control, vertical speed control, and paying attention to altitude are the keys to making a successful approach into that airport. VFR or IFR. The road abeam the airport is an excellent ground reference.

 

 

 

ivatt, on 07 Jan 2016 - 10:04 AM, said:

I have decided that patience is the watch word so will keep going over the same flight until I have completely mastered it rather than being tempted to run before I can walk.

 

Thanks again from a grateful old wrinkly

ivatt, you know that everything requires an element of "learning to walk before running". As you work with ground reference points as they relate to the particular airport you are operating with, practice will make finding the airport much easier as time goes by.

 

I would like to recommend that you go to this website: http://airnav.com/

 

For nearly every airport, they usually have both a road map and a segment of the Sectional Chart for the airport you are looking at.

 

As an example, Post Mills Airport is identified as 2B9. When you launch AirNav, click on the "Airport" select, and type in "2B9", then hit "Get Airport Information". On the web page for that airport, you will see the two maps, on the right hand side of the web page, I have referred to. It sure makes things a lot simpler to have a frame of reference around the airport. The more you use a map, the more you will find available to you to work with, and the easier everything will become as time goes by. It makes learning to run a lot quicker!

 

If you click on the Sectional Chart, a new web page will open up giving you an expanded Sectional Chart to work with.

 

I might note that folks learning to fly are taught to use the Sectional Chart for basic navigation. Now, you have access to what is available to "real world" pilots.

 

Here is a link for Basic FSX Navigation and the use of avionics: http://www.navfltsm.addr.com/index.htm

 

This is a splendid website to pick up some great pointers.

 

Learn to use visual references as much as possible. Then, learn to back everything up using avionics as you progress.

 

Cheers,

 

Jim

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I actually did pretty good heading into Aspen considering. I flew the same path that the plane online flew IRL. My only problem was that I didn't want to be too low; however, I noticed in the clip that the real pilot overflew the little hill on the downwind at 300 AGL at one point. Crazy. Plus, being in the RealAir Duke, I didn't have a lot of time to play with my approach to be set up properly. That plane is tough to manage speed. A tiny adjustment to the power means losing airspeed or gaining way too much. I'm getting good at it but it takes patience.

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I actually did pretty good heading into Aspen considering.

 

Hi, Chris,

 

Aspen is a challenge to fly into and it is fun to work with. Because of the challenges.

 

I don't know if you noticed or not in the video if the pilot was on VASI during the landing. The hill on approach is a factor, but not so much if a pilot stays on the VASI during the approach. It does look rather intimidating though. If you get the chance, please link the video.

 

Had the chance this morning to fly around 2B9. Here is a screenshot showing the roads and the lake (which is frozen over) from over the field.

 

2016-1-8_7-20-20-322.md.jpg

 

Before this morning, I didn't realize that the lake was that close to the field. This would be a fantastic place to actually fly around.

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Hi, thank for all the replies, certainly a lot to get my head around.

 

The MS Flight Simulator For Pilots book in lesson one only deals with take off but I thought I should at least try to get back and land, what could be so difficult. In my past dabbles with MSFS I have spent a lot of time loading various aircraft, mainly large passenger jets and the taking off, flying for a short distance and then exiting MSFS so actually taking off is OK.

 

I have previously tried a few landings but these are probably best not worth mentioning and navigation has been a very dark area. I could literally land up anywhere or give up in frustration. Dabbled with GPS, but without  fully understanding how to set it up and use, not as simple as in the car!!!. Autopilot has been used to some effect, at least this way I get somewhere.

 

This time I am determined to learn navigation so that I can fly from one point to another successfully. Added to that is the wish, once I have arrived, to land.

 

The book I refer to is comprehensive and it's going to take a lot of reading to take it all in but I think it will help. Whether I will follow it to the letter is open to question seeing that I have no plans to be a real pilot.  I think chapter 5 "Old Fashioned Navigation" might be worth a in depth read. Might clarify headings etc. 

 

Have been looking at info on G-PLAN which looks interesting in setting up flight plans and taking some of the mystique out of navigation, but don't want to distracted from the main objective.

 

Thanks again for being so patient.

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Added to that is the wish, once I have arrived, to land.

 

Hello, ivatt,

 

Landings are not the easiest of maneuvers to learn. A successful landing is a combination of controlled input to flight controls and anticipating how much input is enough to control a trend. And maintaining an approach speed using power. The most common issue when trying to fly an airplane to a landing is over-controlling the flight controls and using too much or too little power. It takes a bit to learn how much input is enough.

 

There is a simple way to approach (no pun intended) this exercise.

 

Practice using clear weather with no wind. Once you get the technique down, start putting some "fun and challenge" into the program.

 

When you are lining up with the runway for landing, look at the runway and pick a point on the runway that you want the airplane to touchdown at. The point of touchdown within 100 to 200 feet from the beginning of the runway. Make that point a source of focus as you are flying towards the runway.

 

Points to keep in mind:

 

1. Start your descent to landing approximately 4 to 5 miles from the airport.

 

2. Start your descent to landing approximately 1,000' above the ground (airport elevation plus 1,000').

 

3. Try to maintain the appropriate approach speed for the aircraft you are flying without using large throttle/power inputs. The greater the power inputs, the more difficult it is to maintain an established airspeed and approach angle.

 

4. Try to maintain approximately a 500 foot per minute rate of descent until you are within a height of 25 to 50 feet above the point of touchdown. At which time, reduce power and slowly pitch up to maintain a fairly level pitch to touchdown.

 

5. Try to look out the windshield and focus on your touchdown point more than the airspeed and vertical speed indicators. This will become much easier to do with practice as you become more comfortable in setting up your approach to landing power and pitch settings.

 

5. It is normal to have to make greater than usual power and pitch adjustments at first. It takes time to get to a point where a trend can be corrected using minor power and pitch adjustments. Don't get discouraged!

 

6. Pick a frame of reference from something located at the top of your glareshield as a make-shift "target cue" in relation to the point on the runway that you are going to land at.

 

                     _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Okay, here are the two (2) things to work with while maintaining your approach speed and about a 500 foot per minute rate of descent:

 

As you are flying to the runway, and using your visual reference, if the point of touchdown drops below your reference point, it means that you are climbing above the "approach slope angle" to that touchdown point. Just ease a little off of the throttle and lower the nose of the aircraft just a little and watch what happens. When you see your reference point to the touchdown point starting to come back, add just a little throttle and raise the nose of the aircraft a little to maintain your airspeed and pitch to the touchdown point.

 

As you are flying to the runway, and using your visual reference, if the point of touchdown climbs above your reference point, it means that you are descending below the "approach slope angle" to that touchdown point. Just add a little throttle and raise the nose of the aircraft just a little and watch what happens. When you see your reference point to the touchdown point starting to come back, reduce the throttle a little and lower the nose of the aircraft a little to maintain your airspeed and pitch to the touchdown point.

                  _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Using this technique will help you learn to use both power and pitch to control the aircraft at a determined approach speed and approach slope angle to the point of touchdown. And, using a point of touchdown will give you a target to concentrate on to the spot you want to land at on the runway. This way, you are directly in control of your aircraft. This technique takes the question out of where you are going to land your airplane.

 

This is a way to visually monitor your progress to a point of landing. While you don't actually have to land exactly on the point you have selected (but, hopefully within close proximity of that point), if you use this technique, you might find that very soon landings will become a "non-event".

 

Will it work the first several attempts? Maybe not. But, as you work with this, you will become better tuned to your approach. And, you will become more comfortable using minor power and pitch corrections with each landing attempt.

 

Best to you, ivatt!

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Hi, thank for all the replies, certainly a lot to get my head around.

Hello,

There are interactive lessons in "Learning Center" in FSX, The instructor will teach you pretty much everything you are after :wink:

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Hi, Chris,

 

Aspen is a challenge to fly into and it is fun to work with. Because of the challenges.

 

I don't know if you noticed or not in the video if the pilot was on VASI during the landing. The hill on approach is a factor, but not so much if a pilot stays on the VASI during the approach. It does look rather intimidating though. If you get the chance, please link the video.

 

https://youtu.be/4JwN4QqOTZ0

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Great video! Something I never get tired of.

 

Now I see what you were talking about regarding the "hill".

 

Thank you Chris.

Yes sir.  It's a good approach.  I was closer to the field on downwind and not so much over that hill.  That video helped me understand the real world path better.  I crossed the hill at maybe 1000 AGL, even though I was 1500 above the field elevation.  I'll do better next time.  :wink:

Hi, thank for all the replies, certainly a lot to get my head around.

 

The MS Flight Simulator For Pilots book in lesson one only deals with take off but I thought I should at least try to get back and land, what could be so difficult. In my past dabbles with MSFS I have spent a lot of time loading various aircraft, mainly large passenger jets and the taking off, flying for a short distance and then exiting MSFS so actually taking off is OK.

 

I have previously tried a few landings but these are probably best not worth mentioning and navigation has been a very dark area. I could literally land up anywhere or give up in frustration. Dabbled with GPS, but without  fully understanding how to set it up and use, not as simple as in the car!!!. Autopilot has been used to some effect, at least this way I get somewhere.

 

This time I am determined to learn navigation so that I can fly from one point to another successfully. Added to that is the wish, once I have arrived, to land.

 

The book I refer to is comprehensive and it's going to take a lot of reading to take it all in but I think it will help. Whether I will follow it to the letter is open to question seeing that I have no plans to be a real pilot.  I think chapter 5 "Old Fashioned Navigation" might be worth a in depth read. Might clarify headings etc. 

 

Have been looking at info on G-PLAN which looks interesting in setting up flight plans and taking some of the mystique out of navigation, but don't want to distracted from the main objective.

 

Thanks again for being so patient.

 

 

I personally learned to land back in MSFS 2002, so it's been awhile.  All I do really remember was that my landings and hand-flying was garbage until I invested in a yoke and rudder pedals.  I bought a CH Yoke, which I still use today.  Works great.  Then spending a great deal of time adjusting the sensitivities for each control surface.  Not something you can do overnight.  FS has a tendency to be too sensitive and over-respond to your inputs.  It's tough to get over in that respect.  

 

The GPS are all so easy so I can't comment on that.  I hate the default aircraft and GPS.  Way too basic.  They've improved the aircraft but I can only tolerate the smaller GA stuff.  Actually, the GTN 650 or 750 from Flight One is easy, and in some ways easier than the default.  At least with it you can type in your waypoints and airports, no dialing all over like the older GPS or default one.  Once you learn a GPS you'll be shocked at how easy they are to use.

 

All I can really suggest is reading a little and watching videos.  I think FSX has a teaching center, at least the older MSFS did. 

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'ivatt', on 06 Jan 2016 - 8:53 PM, said:

I am looking at Chapter 1 which deals with Post Mills (Vermont) using a PIper J-3 Cub which has very limited instrumentation which is my first problem as it relies heavily on visual to actually see where you are in relation with the ground. Piper Mills has no real distinctive features like a large airport so is difficult to spot in the distance.

I realise that you are using the example from your book , however 2 things standout that will make your exercises very difficult to conduct .

They are ;

(1) Aircraft type .

The Piper J-3 Cub is a bad choice for learning in .

Recommend that you use a tricycle gear aircraft , not a taildragger , you will have a better view of the runway .

Also use an aircraft that has a complete set of aviation instruments , the Cub panel is hopeless for learning purposes .

Possible aircraft are Piper or Cessna .

(2) Choose a Better airport .

Post Mills is not good for learning Take off and Landing for the following reasons , runway is too short , trees close to both ends ,

Mountinous terrain all around airport , runway is not sealed or numbered , apart from the lake it lacks significant features that are

easily visible from the air .

Recommend an airport that has a sealed and numbered runway that is at least 4,500' long , the longer the better to give you a better chance of getting

down on your early practice approaches and landings .

Choose an airport that is very , very close to the sea , and even better if the coastline has significant features such as a bit of land poking out to sea ,

it will help as a landmark when airborne and approaching your airport.

An additional point that might help are the videos of landings , when you are watching them occassionally hit the Pause button , then look at the Runway ,

what you should be looking at is the Runway perspective , learn that image , it is what you are after .

The standard approach is a 3 degree glideslope , that is the image you will commonly see in the videos , it's the correct image .

*** If you are too low and undershooting the the vertical height of the runway image will reduce , if a real bad undershoot the runway image will reduce

to virtually a flat line .

*** If you are too high (overshooting) the runway image will lengthen until ultimately it becomes a long top down view .

Try to burn that correct " runway perspective image " into you brain , it is what you are after for all your approaches .

When you have Paused the video , get an ordinary one foot school ruler , it will represent your runway , hold it out at arms length from you ,

then raise and lower the end of the ruler that is closest to you , try to match the runway perspective shown in the video ,

do this several times to get used to the required runway perspective image.

Regards landings , be patient with yourself , it has been difficult for all of us at sometime in the past , it will get better , and you will

eventually ace all your landings.

Cheers

Karol

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Thanks for the latest replies, will respond in due course.

 

COBS

 

I think you are right about Piper Mills and the aircraft, in fact I was wondering the same myself, so have spent some time look at a suitable UK airport I could use and have decided on Southend (IATA SEN ICAO EGMC).which is about 30 miles from me and has a long asphalt runaway. Was hoping to us the pier, which is the longest pleasure pier in the world extending 1.34 miles into the Thames estuary but doesn't seem FSX shows it, would have been ideal.

 

Also been looking to change the aircraft to something like a Cessna with better instrumentation.

 

Looked at a couple of online videos regarding the Virtual Flight Path Tool in FSX. As I understand it you have to set either VOR or ILS in the radio of the aircraft to use it but not sure how to identify what I need to enter for Southend.

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If it has not already been mentioned: Download the freeware PLAN-g from TA software. It is equivalent to a sectional map with lots of details.

Btw...I learned to fly in a Piper J-3 and, as someone has already pointed out, it is a really tough plane to take on for learning. Unfortunately, when I was learning to fly, ALL trainers were taildraggers.

Neal Howard

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Thanks Neal, yes was aware and have installed with the idea of creating a short flight plan about 30 minutes to and from Southend and a couple of other local airports, rather than just going around in a circle whilst I'm learning.

 

All the reviews are good and it has a lot of info, much of which I confess I don't understand at the moment and don't want to get side tracked.

 

Does it by chance give the VOR or ILS settings I will need for the Virtual Flight Plan tool?

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Hi  ivatt

 

For Southend airport check the following link ,

https://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=3&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwiyu7rZup_KAhVl5aYKHdaQDeQQFggpMAI&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.rocketroute.com%2Fairports%2Feurope-eu%2Funitedkingdom-gb%2Fplates-southend-egmc.html&usg=AFQjCNFgyYYCVCT1i2RA6CZNS7cXu-7bag&sig2=XLvGRavIUGH2cvzCLAFSHA

 

click on the lines to view the plates (charts) , this will give you all you frequencies for that airport  ,

also spend a little time examining the maps and become familiar with the airport and the area around it ,

that will make you more at home when you are airborne .

 

I have the magnificent ORBX ( FTX ) payware  England scenery installed and thoroughly enjoy flying there ,

 

Cheers

Karol

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Hi COBS, have installed Plan-G (thanks OLDFLYBOY) and that seems quite comprehensive and relatively simple to to use although unless I have missed it it doesn't give you the NAVLOG that FSX provides in Flight Planner.

 

As regards, progress, have now installed a better aircraft Cessna 414A Chancellor also had Piper  PA-42 but this had an issue as below. The Cessna is a nice model.

 

Looked at the link you gave an have printed off the relative Instrument Approach Chart and this give 4 frequencies for Southend including App 130.775. Looked at the map and not sure I fully understand it but will keep working I'm sure it will go in eventually.

 

Created a short flight plan to go from London City Airport, fly over Duxford and then land at Southend but this didn't go quite according to plan as I ended up flying over the channel despite the GPS giving the correct routing on the display (it also I think kept flashing an message that my settings were incorrect but it went too quickly to really read).. Also The Piper PA-42 wouldn't let me change the NAV frequencies from 113.70 and 117.20.

 

I wonder if I could ask a really big favour? Is it possible you could give me step by step instructions on how to set everything up to do the above flight with GPS? Also what setting(s) to use to enable the Virtual Flight Plan for my approach to Southend.

 

My thinking is that if I have a working model I can follow step by step I will understand things much better and can then use that knowledge as a basis for other flights. It's rather like having an instructor sitting next to me say do this, now do that, I'm sure you get the idea.

 

If you can help I would be extremely grateful.

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Hi ivatt

 

(1) Those charts are for IFR (Instrument Flight Rules) use so they can be complex to understand.

     Although I have uses approach plates quite often  , the 2 ILS plates for Southend left me with smoke coming out of my ears ( ! ?? )

    Will have to have another look at them to locate the ILS frequencies.

(2) Regards changing the frequency , you will find a "Swap" button on the radio .

     One frequency will be active , and the other is standby .

      The Swap button toggles either frequency to active then another click sets the other frequency to active .

(3) Flashing messages in the GPS usually indicate that that you are very near or transgressed a controlled airspace without

      ATC (Air Traffic Control) clearance , for your purposes at this stage just ignore the messages.

 

I will conduct a flight  London City > Duxford > Southend  and get back to you in a day or two with ,

- Route details

- Frequencies for radios

- Autopilot / GPS settings

 

Cheers

Karol

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ivatt

 

ILS for Southend ,

Radio in NAV1 set frequency 111.35 for the ILS

Runway heading is 236 degrees is set in autopilot  ILS or NAV window.

 

Suggest the following flight plan route ;

EGLC = London City ,

> EGLD = Denham ,

> EGSU = Duxford ,

> CLN = Clacton VOR

> EGMC = Southend

 

Suggested flight plan altitude 2,500' .

 

NOTE;

(1) Denham was included as it is approxiamately in alignment wit the take off direction from London City , it makes easier to engage

the autopilot following Take off.

(2) Clacton VOR was included as it aligns the final flight plan  leg with the Southend runway direction for the ILS (236 degrees).

(3) Both of your above aircraft have retractable undercarraige , remember to lower gear as well as flaps during approach .

     At a guess landing speed is about 95 knots.

 

Cheers

Karol

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Hi Karol

 

Thanks for the update really appreciate your time.

 

Hoping to be able to reverse engineer the info you provided so I can see how you got there.

 

Will post back when I have had the chance to implement what you have given me with a flight, but it may not be until early next week as I have a busy few days ahead of me.

 

Regards

 

Chris

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Hi Chris

 

It all can be an overload , that's standard for all of us , don't worry about it , it eventually all sinks in.

 

I will go through the whole process step by step in several posts.

 

I will use the FS Flight planner and the default Baron aircraft as I do not have the above mentioned aircraft ,

or any addon flight planner.

 

Cheers

Karol

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