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Raven9000

Explain GPS/Radars/Panels to a Noob

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So I'm trying to understand the concept of the add-ons of the GPS/Glass Panel type, like the 750, realityxp, etc, and not really understanding the point, or rathe the reasoning behind them and some features.

 

I guess I will try to make the questions simple because clearly I'm not understanding something...

 

- I noticed that ou already have some garmin stuff included in FSX itself. What do the paid add-ons bring as better/extra that you would want to use one instead of that?

 

- What is the point of the subscription services I see some of these have? I don't quite understand the concept of a simulated gps/radar (because you're not really moving of course) within a simulator, where the program knows at all times where you are in the virtual world and what the conditions are.

 

 

Can anybody explain in a way even a dummy like me can understand?

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Let me try..

 

The Garmin GPS500 that comes with FSX is a simplified version of the real thing.  The map is very crude and the capabilities of the gauge logic are limited, to say it nicely.

 

What RXP and Flight1 bring to the table, are gauges that are 100% true to the real thing.

Everything you can do in the real airplane gauge, you can do in the sim (with minor exceptions).

 

RXP is now old technology and no longer supported by the author.

 

Flight1 GTN 750 is the way to go these days.

 

Subscription services are for FMS systems (in airliners) that update the navigation data on a monthly basis.  Navigraph is one such service.

 

There is no available service to update the Garmin navdata in the sim..  although there are copies of recently expired navdata to be found, if you know some real world pilots.

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Let me try..

 

The Garmin GPS500 that comes with FSX is a simplified version of the real thing.  The map is very crude and the capabilities of the gauge logic are limited, to say it nicely.

 

What RXP and Flight1 bring to the table, are gauges that are 100% true to the real thing.

Everything you can do in the real airplane gauge, you can do in the sim (with minor exceptions).

 

RXP is now old technology and no longer supported by the author.

 

Flight1 GTN 750 is the way to go these days.

 

Subscription services are for FMS systems (in airliners) that update the navigation data on a monthly basis.  Navigraph is one such service.

 

There is no available service to update the Garmin navdata in the sim..  although there are copies of recently expired navdata to be found, if you know some real world pilots.

 

 

Hi Bert, thanks for the explanation!

 

I guess I kind of understand the products themselves with that, in a sense like how you can compare an aircraft that comes with FSX, or a low quality one, and a high quality one where every knob and switch works?

 

 

What I still don't get is the subscription part... Maybe it's because I don't know what "nav data" comprehends, because I'm thinking:  If you are already in a simulated world, and the sim knows that all the conditions are, what the heck do you need external data for??

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What I still don't get is the subscription part... Maybe it's because I don't know what "nav data" comprehends, because I'm thinking:  If you are already in a simulated world, and the sim knows that all the conditions are, what the heck do you need external data for??

 

it's not the 'conditions' so much as the locations of various navigation aids, runways, and the associated approaches and airways. this stuff changes over time. it has changed substantially since FSX was released 10 years ago. for example an airport might have a new ILS antenna and associated approach that was added a few months ago, then an updated navdata set is necessary to actually see that approach in the gps. bigger airports have STAR procedures that can change every now and then as well.

 

you are correct that you don't absolutely need it. where it becomes necessary is if you like to use real-world charts and flight planning info, or if you are flying online such as vatsim/ivao where it is expected you'll have updated navdata.

 

cheers

-andy crosby

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One advantage of the default GPS is that all its data come from the FSX scenery files, so all the other instruments such as VOR, NDB, and visual scenery should be in agreement.  Using external nav data sources generally don't also update the FSX scenery files.

 

For online flying in particular VATSIM, obviously everyone needs to be using a common nav data so it is common that users keep current with real world nav data.

 

One area of default FSX weakness is in instrument flight between airport and enroute environments -- namely, so-called SID and STAR procedures.  Simmers who have interest in instrument flight generally want to be able to incorporate these procedures into their flight plans so the 3rd party gauges (and nav data) are needed.

 

scott s.

.

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