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Vinny002

DC-6 fuel system

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Hi, guys!

 

I noticed something is not right regarding the DC-6's fuel system. The DC-6 can fly for about 9 hours or about 2,400 nautical miles instead of about 15-16 hours or about 4,000 nautical miles like the real DC-6 flies. Does anyone else notice this? Thanks!

 

Cheers,

Vincent Majerowicz

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instead of about 15-16 hours or about 4,000 nautical miles like the real DC-6 flies.

 

According to...?

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Holy moly... I don't think there is enough oil in the engines for 15-16 hours!

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Oil would be enough (Did Leg's EDFH-BIKF-CYRB-PANC without refilling oil; you shouldn't refill above 20g per engine). But the DC6 was equipped with 8 OR 10 fuel tanks. The other 2 aux tanks give you about 800 gallons more fuel (don't have the values here). Also I flew about 10h with 800BHP setting in cruise (initially 1000BHP). But you've to fly low and not up in the air over the weather. I learned from AFE and took over more and more jobs from him.

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Hi, gnomegemini!

 

For the longest range, what is the best altitude, manifold pressure setting, and prop RPM? Thanks!

 

Cheers

Vincent

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For the longest range, what is the best altitude, manifold pressure setting, and prop RPM? Thanks!

 

The DC6 pilot we worked with during testing mentioned they use 800HP cruise and rarely exceed 8000 ft, page 312 in the POH, which will be about 1700/29 inHg.  Best fuel will be lowest power you can use and stay in the air, while also manually setting your mixtures to keep the engines firing.  A turbojet will go high for best fuel because the air is thinnest but that approach doesn't work for most flight profiles in the DC-6 where your best power is low altitude and the thin air doesn't really start to kick in until above 14000 IMHO.

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Hi, downscc!

 

Thanks for the explanation! I'll give it a try!

 

Cheers

Vincent Majerowicz

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Yes right. The jet's have the power to fly faster than the structure of the airplane is able to handle. So you go high where you move fast and the drag of air (and therefore stress to the structure) is low. A prop needs a higher RPM/MP setting to fly high and this produces more noise but is not more fuel efficient nor do you have more BHP. As far as I know they tried to fly under 14.000ft but had the opportunity to fly over the weather and climb higher to give the passengers a more confortable ride if really needed. You must know... on these day's a flight ticket of a 6-8h flight would cost about $3800. And fuel was pretty cheap on these day's.

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