Andrew Urbanczyk

Small plane, big job ahead.

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Hello,

 

I am looking to cross the atlantic in a cessna 310 esc aircraft.  Obviously it can be different, but something small would be the best.  I would like to know what you guys think would be best.  I need MAXIMUM range possible.  I mean like GIANT aMaZiNg range here.  Comment below if you got any ideas 😉

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6 minutes ago, Andrew Urbanczyk said:

  I mean like GIANT aMaZiNg range here

Tick the unlimited fuel option.  Find smallest plane.  Fly

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2 minutes ago, ErichB said:

Tick the unlimited fuel option.  Find smallest plane.  Fly

Pfft.  That's weak.  I mean yeah I could do that, but then what's the fun?  I will obviously have to land somewhere.  Just trying to go as far at one time as possible.

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1 minute ago, Andrew Urbanczyk said:

Pfft.  That's weak.  I mean yeah I could do that, but then what's the fun?  I will obviously have to land somewhere.  Just trying to go as far at one time as possible.

Not sure there are any aircraft modeled well enough (especially in relation to fuel burn) to do the job properly, so it's a highly unlikely proposition from the start unless you make compromises.  Not sure if the A2A Comanche can make the long leg with tip tanks, but that is the kind of aircraft fidelity you'd be looking for.

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I mean, yeah it would be nice but I know there are pretty good things out there, just below.  If you have any ideas of something that could fly around 2000 nmi in one go let me know.

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From your criteria, the candidates would seem to be...

Piper PA-31 Navajo        1,011 nm
Cessna 310                    1,000 nm
Beech Duke B60            1,227 nm

Probably bigger than you're looking for, but if you don't mind the size and slow speed...
PBY Catalina                   2,520 nm  (at least if you have to ditch, you have more options:smile:)

Or if you're prepared to go turboprop...

Beech King Air C90          1,321 nm
Piper PA-42 Cheyenne     1,330 nm    

Caveat: these are Wikipedia numbers and probably based on "book" values. Real-life, oops, I mean real-sim performance will probably be less.

There is also the approach of fitting an additional collapsible fuel tank to the interior, which I'm sure I've seen done on Ice Pilots or Dangerous Flights or possibly both. Research how much could be carried in such a tank and allow yourself to "top up" in flight, remembering to add the fuel's weight as cargo/pax before departure, and reducing those numbers whenever you top up.

Edited by Holdit
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2 minutes ago, Andrew Urbanczyk said:

fly around 2000 nmi in one go let me know.

unlikely

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Hi Folks,

Most RW GA flights across the Atlantic use hops:

  • US
  • Canada
  • Greenland
  • Iceland
  • Faroe Islands
  • UK

No need for 2K mile range and a great deal less boring with stops... At Bonanza speed 2K miles equates to 12.5 hours of nonstop flight - sans wind...

Regards,
Scott

Edited by scottb613
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F/A 18-C Hornet, have a tanker on stand by😎

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Hi Folks,

Here's one of my favorites - a Doctor decided to fly his C172 (with ferry tanks) from the US to Australia and back again - longest flight was an ungodly 20 hours or something like that... This is a great series and I found it interesting... Shows all the prep work as well...

 

 

Regards,
Scott

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1 minute ago, scottb613 said:

Hi Folks,

Here's one of my favorites - a Doctor decided to fly his C172 (with ferry tanks) from the US to Australia and back again - longest flight was an ungodly 20 hours or something like that... This is a great series and I found it interesting... Shows all the prep work as well...

Another one for my ever-growing Watch Later list...yeah, thanks a lot.  :biggrin:

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Cessna 421C - 1487nm maximum range and pressurized to get over some of the weather.

Jesse

Edited by JesC
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You should bear in mind that it's not entirely unrealistic to stick 'unlimited fuel' on in this scenario, although altering the aircraft file might be a bit more of a realistic way of going about it. Many ferry flights of single-engined and twin-engined GA aeroplanes are made with an additional ferry tank having been added in the cabin in place of where the passenger seats are, and the aeroplane itself generally has quite a lot of survival gear on board, often the pilot will fly whilst wearing some kind of immersion suit unless it impedes the controls, in which case they'd have one to hand (although having done ditching training in a helicopter mock up a few years  ago, when I had to go and work on some gas rigs out at sea, which drops into a water tanks and submerges and then rolls through 180 degrees, I have to say I'd question the likelihood of getting an immersion suit on after ditching in the Atlantic). In addition to a liferaft and all the related stuff which goes with it for ditching all that survival stuff plus the ferry fuel weighs a lot, and getting out of a submerged inverted aircraft in one of those suits is not as easy as you might think lol. You can be pretty sure a GA aeroplane loaded up with survival gear etc will not float for long on an Atlantic swell.

So if I were you and wanted to simulate such a flight properly, I would be tempted to alter the config file to add the additional weight and option of a ferry tank, and I'd use something like the A2A Commanche or any other add-on which has proper engine management and simulates the risk of the engine breaking if you don't treat it correctly, otherwise the task itself would be a boring no brainer with no 'adventure' to it.

You might want to consider using the Aerosoft PBY Catalina, it has about the same speed as most GA twins and has some great engine modeling (on par with A2As). If you don't have that aeroplane, it's well worth getting, not least because it has a great GPS gauge in it which is useful to have for adding to other aeroplanes, but even without that, it's one of the best add-on aeroplanes you can get for P3D V4.

Having something which simulates airframe icing would be good too in terms of realism, since most GA twins and singles will be right in the icing zone at their typical cruise altitude. So Active Sky will probably be worth getting if you don't already have it.

If you added Accufeel to maybe the Lionheart Bellanca Turbo Viking, I think that would be a good choice. Although it only has a range of 1,200 miles, if you added a ferry tank to it via the config file, it could definitely make it, and it has the advantage of being quite fast since it is a turbocharged engine and it has a good service ceiling, since it simulates using oxygen, i.e. it can cruise at well over 200 mph at over 20,000 feet, which is not bad for a single, it has a basic set of avionics, but among them is a GPS.

Failing that, another fun one to do it in is the A2A Boeing B17G Flying Fortress. I flew that in formation with a friend who was in the RAF, he was in another A2A B17G and we connected online in FSX a few years ago and went all the way from the US to Scotland, with us alternating the leader position every once in a while to make it easier on the person maintaining formation. It took us a very long time since the B17G does not have a very fast cruise speed when loaded up with fuel, but it was fun nursing them all the way there thanks to the Accusim function of that add on. When we arrived at Scotland it was fogged in too, so we had fun getting down safely through the clouds to eventually land. Having four propeller engines is very reassuring when over something as big as the Atlantic!

Not sure I'd want to try it again because it took so long to make the flight at I would say an average airspeed of around 200 mph, although we made sure we did it via a route where there was a very good tailwind, so our groundspeed was considerably higher than that; it was a memorable experience for both of us which we still talk about occasionally because it was such a good fun challenge and it was historically interesting too, since many B17 crews in WW2 did actually make that flight in their Flying Fortresses after they'd finished their training in the US.

If you want a cheaper way to try that, the Aeroplane Heaven B17F/G is particularly good when you add A2A's Accu-Feel to it, plus it is a slightly better visual model than the A2A one.

Edited by Chock
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