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Rollout Rudder/Braking Technique

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Hey guys, Well, after more than a decade of flightsimming, I finally took the plunge and picked up some rudder pedals. I must admit that flying both GA and commercial aircraft is much more precise and (more importantly) enjoyable!I do have one issue after I get the three wheels back on the ground. I now have a couple options for steering...rudder and differential braking. I am finding that mixing the two is EXTREMELY difficult. My questions... assuming no autobrake, what is the normal way (i.e. real-world) of controlling the high-speed portion of the landing rollout? Do pilots use both, and I just suck because I don't have any practice?I'm having a similar issue between 80knots and taxi speed, but at least that doesn't end up with me headed off the runway. Any help is greatly appreciated!ThanksJeff HepburnKDEN

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Just from the Ga side you usually want to use your brakes as little as possible. On landing you will use the rudders to steer, and only apply brakes sparingly to slow down. Also, make sure the full weight of the airplane is down before braking or you will get an instant flat spot on the tire that will make it have to be replaced. When slow if you need a tight turn you can use differential brakes to make a tight turn-on a twin you can use your throttle on one engine to also turn.My blog:http://geofageofa.spaces.live.com/

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I used both on my RW aircraft but had to be careful as it was a taildragger and a nose over would have been bot embarrassing and expensive. However, there was a much better feeling of the pressure on each wheel than there is in FSX. I have CH rudder/brake pedals on my PC and with only a couple of small springs giving pressure feedback it is very easy to induce differential braking, much more so than RW. The trick is to only use brakes in FS when you really have to and if your flying a taildragger make sure you keep the stick back in your guts.

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Differential braking is only used when a tight turn is necessary at low speed on the ground. And, some taildraggers lose rudder control at a certain airspeed and/or they don't have steerable tailwheels. In these cases braking is the only directional control available. Otherwise, brakes are not used for steering.ArtBiostar TF560-A2+, Athlon 64X2-6000+, 4GB RAM, Geforce 8800GTS-320MB, 500W PSU, 250GB HD, FSX (SP1-SP2), Vista Home Premium 32 bit, CH Yoke & Pedals, 22" WS LCD monitor

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Ok, so it sounds like we've got the GA/taildragger perspective. How about the older big iron with no autobrakes...like the 727 or DC-9?Is it poor technique to apply a slight differential pressure from one side to the other to maintain the centerline? Or should I be striving for constant, equal braking combined with rudder deflection to maintain centerline? I find the latter to be really tough...I just swerve back and forth down the runway :)Jeff HepburnKDEN

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I think the problem on these is that IRL the rudder pedals only move the nose wheel a small amount, like 6 degrees. I think fsuipc allows a method of uncoupling the tiller from the rudder pedals, but I haven't tried this. What seems to work best for me is quick "stabs" at the pedals. That doesn't really work so well if you are also braking though. I also find it hard to maintain uniform brake pedal effort on the CH rudder. I tried using the fsuipc slope function to reduce the sensitivity at initial deflection of the pedals, but not sure that is solving my problem much. I have been leaving the "brake" message on, so I can see when it goes to "differential brake". scott s..

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>Differential braking is only used when a tight turn is>necessary at low speed on the ground. And, some taildraggers>lose rudder control at a certain airspeed and/or they don't>have steerable tailwheels. In these cases braking is the only>directional control available. Otherwise, brakes are not used>for steering.>Castoring (non-steering) nosegear, which is installed on a few production aircraft, and many homebuilt/kitbuilts use differential brakes for turning too. As speed builds (usually a bit faster than taxi speeds), the rudder will have enough effect for directional control. Once lined up straight ahead on the runway for takeoff, the rudder is usually sufficient without use of the differential brakes.Same for landing. The brakes probably won't be needed until slowing down enough to exit the runway.L.Adamson

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>Ok, so it sounds like we've got the GA/taildragger>perspective. How about the older big iron with no>autobrakes...like the 727 or DC-9?>>Is it poor technique to apply a slight differential pressure>from one side to the other to maintain the centerline? Or>should I be striving for constant, equal braking combined with>rudder deflection to maintain centerline? I find the latter>to be really tough...I just swerve back and forth down the>runway :)>>Jeff Hepburn>KDENUse reverse thrust until you are below 60 kts while maintaining directional control with the rudder pedals. In the RW, 'big iron' has a seperate wheel for ground steering, but not in FS. Under 60tks, brake as needed to slow to taxi speed then again use rudder to turn.My pedals are way too sensitive in FS, no matter how I have them adjusted, so I use VERY SLIGHT movement with them while rolling.XP Pro SP2-FSX SP2AMD FX60-8800GTS-2 Gigs RAMFEX-GEX-UTUSA-FSGenesis-and a bunch of other stuffComputer optomized by www.fs-gs.com

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