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Guest Agrajag

1900C and an FMC

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Guest Agrajag

Recently I've been considering flying another plane in addition to, or to replace my beloved PSS Dash-8 (I would love to see what PMDG would do with the Dash line). I own the 1900C (thanks) and a couple other planes (like the ATR).If it's not obvious, I haven't been a big jet fan, especially the larger planes. However, I also find I don't like the GA VFR stuff either. I like the idea of flying a fairly comprehensive plane with a moderate number of passengers and flying to airports that are somewhat likely to see my plane but also see the big boys. I like flying SID/STAR's and having to plan ahead for it all.That said, I bought the ATR and it was overload. First, few are flown especially here in the States. Second, it's just too much for me to bother with. The Dash-8 is a nice level of complexity for me. Thus, I really liked the concept of the PMDG Express line.However, I'm now wondering two things:1) Would the 1900C fly in many of the same places that a Dash-8 would? Would it be out there flying to the big airports in the major cities?2) Does it usually have an FMC? I wouldn't want to give up having to key in all the legs of the journey and such and not just in a GPS. Is the 1900C a well done plane that you just skipped the FMC for or does it just not have one because it really never flies that way?Finally, if you have any recommendations on other planes I should consider, I'm all ears.

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I recommend the 737 because it's my favorite and it sounds like you might like the same type of flying I do, which is mostly shorthaul to lots of places. I've spent the last three months learning it well (enough) and have flown into several dozen SWA locations, some numerous times.I don't think you'll find a full-fledged FMC in an aircraft like the B1900 for the simple reason the economics aren't there. The real reason they are found in bigger iron is due to their impact on the bottom line, pure and simple. Having said that, the route planning and database capabilities of real world GPS sets you do find in large turboprops are impressive. I don't own the PMDG 1900 but I suspect it's a long ways from the stuff you find in B200 & B350s today.


Dan Downs KCRP

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The 1900 is not flown by an FMC. I know a Delta F/o that flew for a small regional airline in Michigan and into Minnesota...He flew the 1900C and said they would regularly fly 8-10 leg days with no autopilot. That being said, I don't think they had an FMC either.


Dan Charles
Dash 8 Q200/Q300 PIC
 

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Re: RoutesI use FSBuild for flight planning and like some others can export routes to the PMDG 737 line and also the LDS FMCs. In the 737NG they are loaded in as a CO ROUTE. FS NAV according to posts has a download .dll that exports to PMDG as well. (FS Build interfaces to Active Sky for winds aloft so with the aircraft profile set for the 737 - xxx fuel planning is done there.) FSBuild has autorouting and with minor touchup for errors due to soft waypoints that can be duplicated generally creates a very useful flightplan to both FS9 and PMDG so you can use this with probably the B1900 GPS nav tool as well - I do not have the 1900 but I assume it can import an FS9 plan.If creating the routes is your only objection for the FMC then an import from a flight planner should take care of that. Also note that you can create routes in the 737NG FMC and save them for reuse.With the FMC you can select a departure or arrival procedure (SID or DP, or STAR plus the IAP) or take waypoints from an external planner. Then you advance and/or delete waypoints as required.What is keyed into the FMC or selected is weather information (take-off temp, cruise level wind and temp, etc.) and some other info mostly having to do with flight dynamics. You can get used to it and do it fairly quickly.You will find probably the systems order more complex to get going but again once you are used to it it takes less time.I just wanted to cover your objections regarding the FMC and expose possibly other opportunitites.


Ron Ginsberg
KMSP Minnesota, Land of 10,000 Puddles
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Guest Agrajag

Thanks guys. I'm sort of stuck (though I'm seriously considering the 737 now (not sure which one though as I'm new to PMDG for serious stuff).I really love flying my Dash-8 but do want to consider something else. The 1900C was fun to fly but doesn't hold my interest for enough flying to really make it a good choice. If it were realistically able to use and fly an FMC and FMC routes, I might have given it another shot but given the above comments I think it'll be relegated to part-time flight status for me.I'd love to see PMDG do a Dash or some other turbo-prop of medium size. Everyone loves doing the big jets but they're so complicated to fly correctly that I just can't be bothered. I have Flight 1's ATR and think, "I'd like to read this manual but I'm not going to waste the time, hassle and especially the toner and paper for nearly 500 page manual! No way!" So it goes unflown as it's too complicated to just jump in and figure out from a two-page quick reference chart (not counting the FMC).Not sure how much sense that all made but maybe it did to someone out there.

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If you are considering only one suite of the PMDG 737NG I suggest getting Aerosoft's CD package of the 800/900. This gives you more implemented features in the FMC and ND. Aerosoft's package is a stand alone and it is not necessary to get the 600/700.If you purchase the 600/700 installing the 800/900 upgrade will upgrade the 600/700 panel as indicated.Since I'm bound by modem for downloads I ordered both CDs by Aerosoft and downloaded from Aerosoft a small CD service pack.I emulate Southwest, Sun Country, Hapag-Lloyd Express, and Air Berlin (perhaps more to come) so I needed both a 700 and 800 anyway.Also, the Aerosoft packages include a printed operations booklet and an FMC booklet for each suite with enough to get you going.If a regional medium to somewhat long range (up to six hours from San Diego to Honolulu via a Pacific route is possible) aircraft is the 737NGs are very versatile and popular.If you go to www.flightaware.com, pick a departure or arrival flight at an FAA airport, and it will open up a window showing you the real world flightplan filed along with other flight data. You will notice that in most cases there really is not too much data to enter unless you are entering transoceanic geographic coordinates. I have pasted some of these routes into FS Build and with minor tweaking of the route it was able to build it and export for import into the PMDG FMC (and FS9).For those interested in the Aerosoft CD versions www.pcaviator.com has a 10 percent discount up to midnight terminating 7/4-7/5. They ship my material via priority USPS (or faster if wanted) and are located in South Carolina for the Americas and in Australia for Europe and Pacific, etc. There may be other specials elsewhere. They do have both 737NG full packs and the 747-400 passenger version. I'm just passing this on.


Ron Ginsberg
KMSP Minnesota, Land of 10,000 Puddles
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Support Team

 

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Rich,Like many others, I can highly recommend the B737 NG from Precision Manuals. It will give you plenty of FMC practice which will amaze you with its versatility.If you are going to upgrade to FSX, you might like to wait for the upgrade of the B737 NG's that they are working on.Neil B

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