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yankeegolf3

realistic damage simulation

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hi,I think it is a pity that most aircraft don't simulate pilot induced damage. I only know of two models with which you have to fly by the book or you face the consequences.The digital aviation DO27 and Charles Owen's DC3C which is even better as far as damage simulation is concerned.Once you have flown an aircraft for which you have to take care of all the systems, any other aircraft is somewhat dull and unrealistic. After all, isn'it like that that aircraft have to be taken care of? Does anyone know of other aircraft with realistic damage simulation?cheers

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Yes, bugged me a long time..Why isnt there a simple gauge that counts seconds or minuts and quit an engine when it is at max power for x time ? to simulate engine abuse ?Or a gauge that simulates overheats, oil leaks and such ?JohanA LITTLE LESS CONVERSATION, AND A LITTLE MORE ACTION PLEASE..http://www.jdserver.mine.nu/johanGlobal Logistics VAhttp://www.jdserver.mine.nu/va

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There's an addon for the Yakovlev Yak-18T available here in the file library.The engine will blow if you overheat it, you might lose pneumatic pressure if things are not done correctly, blow a tyre if the plane lands too heavy etc. etc.

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If your talking about freeware then I'm not sure, but stuff like this has been available on the high end payware packages for a while, even FSpassengers has a varied generic failure system.Rob

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MMmmmmmm Yakovlev Yak-18T! :9 Yet more incredible Russian freeware.So many do not know what they are missing. :)

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>If your talking about freeware then I'm not sure, but stuff>like this has been available on the high end payware packages>for a while, even FSpassengers has a varied generic failure>system.>>RobYes FSP does a good job at punishing you for over stepping the limits of the plane. You lower the flpas while going to fast and they break, same goes for the gear. FSP also has the feature to have random failures, and they become more frequent if you don't maintain your plane (and they can happen even if you do). FSP does nothing however for engine managment. You can crank that sucker all day if you like.

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>>If your talking about freeware then I'm not sure, but>stuff>>like this has been available on the high end payware>packages>>for a while, even FSpassengers has a varied generic failure>>system.>>>>Rob>>Yes FSP does a good job at punishing you for over stepping the>limits of the plane. You lower the flpas while going to fast>and they break, same goes for the gear. FSP also has the>feature to have random failures, and they become more frequent>if you don't maintain your plane (and they can happen even if>you do). FSP does nothing however for engine managment. You>can crank that sucker all day if you like.>>It's a tricky one indeed.On the one hand most failure generators produce generic type malfunctions that are either random or at a given time interval.Those generated failures have nothing to do with the way you actually handle any given airplane.The other side of this coin is, that if you want to have a simulation rather than a game you need to be based on some data or information.Is there any way of knowing if and when an engine would blow up once you "crank that sucker"? was it ever tested?If one programs an arbitrary probability of say, 50 percent, is it more "realistic" than a probability of zero?I honestly don't have an answer to which is the "better" scenario.

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"Why isnt there a simple gauge that counts seconds or minuts and quit an engine when it is at max power for x time ? to simulate engine abuse ?"Hi Johan...I am late in replying because I don't read the forums quite so often anymore, but your question caught my eye. Bill Lyons' Challenger Microlight had such a gauge--run the aircraft in the red for more than five minutes, and you lose the engine. His Challenger modeled the Rotax 503 and having flown several two-stroke equipped aircraft in real life, I find it quite real to have to keep an eye on the rpms in his Challenger. I'd also love to see a two stroke failure modeled if the engine isn't warmed up before flying. That's even more of a concern for us Microlight jockeys.Regards,John

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the ready for pushback 747-200 and PMDG 747-400 simulate failures from engine abuse and flameouts from heavy rain... Also has anyone else noticed that fs9 keeps a log of the amount of hours of each engine on every aircraft you have ever flown? it's saved somewhere deep within the documents and setting folders.Rob

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hi,I recommend that you download Charles Owen's DC3C and you will see how brilliant his approach is (read the manual, especially the introduction and section 3. In fact you have to perform every item of the check list (and not pretend to do it) because anything can go wrong either caused by pilot induced error or by random failure. there is also a sophisticated damage count which takes into account past slight mistreatments, add them up till a failure threshold. By no means your flights are plagued by failures if you are careful but you have to monitor your systems all the time like in a real aircraft.cheers

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I can't swear to this -- it was some time ago and perhaps memory is playing tricks on me -- but I think my MAAM DC-3 experienced damage in a pretty realistic way.On takeoff, my left tire slightly brushed a berm at the end of the runway, but the plane successfully became airborne. When I attempted to retract the gear I could see from the "chase plane camera" that the left main was still extended, though the right did retract. Repeated attempts at gear retraction did not solve the problem. I landed without unusual incident (except, as a real pilot might say, "intense curiosity about what was going to happen") and did not have any failure of gear retraction on subsequent flights.There are plenty of people who really KNOW the MAAM DC-3 who could tell you if this scenario is possible with their airplane -- I'm just reporting this as a raw novice who thinks he experienced it.

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I guess that a gauge maker reasonable easy can make a gauge that reads your throttle input, and or engine rpm's, and let a timer run.If the throttle/rmp stick at max or within a threshold, the engine is cutt off.Would be an extra thing to watch on takeoffs and go arounds with one engine..JohanA LITTLE LESS CONVERSATION, AND A LITTLE MORE ACTION PLEASE..http://www.jdserver.mine.nu/johanGlobal Logistics VAhttp://www.jdserver.mine.nu/va

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