Sign in to follow this  
Guest

Question for FAA Licensed Pilots

Recommended Posts

Do you have an Enroute Frequency that you monitor when not operating on an MF during VFR flight? In Canada when enroute we monitor 126.70 but I cannot find anywhere about a frequency to monitor when flying in the States.. I have seen a Flightwatch frequency of 122.0.. is that what you use for relaying position reports to other traffic??Thanks,Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

Good question--I'm curious to know myself. I often run live ATC on my scanner while flying FS2002. I have a frequency book at home that I often try to match up against FS2002's freq's. There are special freq's for airline to maint comms. I've monitored these on my scanner often. And there are the SW SSB freqs for Transoceanic flights for position reports. I monitor these as well, and from my home in Phoenix, I've picked up flights as far out as Ireland to the east, and well past the Aleutians to the west. But I've never found an in flight freq....-John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the US there is a "GUARD" frequency of 121.50 mHz. This is the emergency channel that ALL ATC monitors. If you have 2 com raidos this frequency should be monitored. Given the many TFR's, enhanced class B, and pop-up NOTAMS it would be wise to monitor this freq if you are not under ATC. An F16 can do alot of dammage with just a fly-by and if you do not respond to voice commands given by the intercepting a/c or ATC you are in a heap of trouble.KevinPP-ASEL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While flying VFR (In the USA) in uncontrolled airspace there is no requirement to monitor any frequency. I do not believe there is any new regulation about 121.5 other than a recommendation to monitor that if you have dual radio capability. I am not up to speed on the latest AIM or FAR's though.Hornit

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the U.S there is no single frequency to monitor when flying VFR. 121.5 is for emergencies as mentioned earlier.In the chicago land area, quite a few uncontrolled airports are on 122.80 and that seems to be common around this area for UNICOM...so you really have to monitor different frequencies for VFR Traffic and such.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So you are basically just monitoring the MF/Unicom for the area you are flying in, unless you are getting into a larger controlled area where you monitor approach etc if in their airspace, or I guess even talk to Center for flight following. I guess with airports being much tighter together in the States than Canada, there is no real "En Route" then. We can flying for 100s of miles up here before encountering anything resembling a strip!! Thanks,ChrisLeft Seat Aztec - Right Seat Navajo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is actually an open channel that aircraft can use in the US to chat to each other but we dont monitor it though and very easy to remember: 123.45. Aviation's version of the partyline, you never know whos listening.......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

True enough, but it is highly encouraged to monitor 121.5 if you have nobody else to talk to. It also makes it much easier for (god forbid) an intercepting aircraft to talk to you and give you instructions if you violate airspace rules.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's no requirement to monitor 121.5. It is recommended somewhere in the FAR/AIM but I can't see any advantage and don't bother doing it.On short flights below 3000 AGL, I monitor local traffic frequencies for the airports along my path. Above 3000 AGL, I request VFR traffic advisories ("flight following") and monitor that frequency, especially in the busy Chicagoland airspace. Over the south suburbs Chicago Departure provides the service on 133.5.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone know the rationale for the FAA recommendation to monitor 121.5? My guess is it's a holdout from a time when radar coverage and radio reception were incomplete. A pilot monitoring 121.5 might be able to assist another in distress, relay information, etc.Does this rationale still make sense, in your opinion?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

all towers, approach, FSS, etc. monitor it continuously.P4 1.8768 ram 80 gig hardriveVisiontek Ti4 4600CH yoke/pedalsElite Multi quadrant19" inch monitor-Soundblaster PCI 512Win XPInstrument rated ASEL -236 hoursAOPALawyerPilots Bar Association"Men without dreams are never free, twas thus this way and thus will ever be."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

121.5 is monitored because that is the frequency that Emergency Locater Transmitters are set to. If you crash, the ELT transmits a locating signal so that you can be found. If you are lucky enough to get down softly but need help, get a big rock and pound the ELT until it goes off. Help will soon be on the way, hopefully. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It makes perfect sense, though its not mandated. As stated above its also known as the guard freq, as in National Guard, that they will try to contact you on if you are being intercepted and forced to reroute. Also if you're flying out in the middle of no where you can help ATC listen for fallen pilots if their ELT goes off. I sure would like to know someone is listening if I ever go down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm. Those reasons don't seem compelling. ELT will broadcast on 121.5 automatically and doesn't require monitoring the frequency. The benefit of picking up another pilot's emergency signal would be slight except in remote areas. It is not likely that National Guard interceptors will take much interest in me.It seems wiser to use one radio to receive radar traffic advisories, the other to monitor local traffic or weather.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The ELT signal will vary in strength depending on how close you are to that signal. This can be easily detected by listening to the 121.5 freq. In several of the airplanes that I have flown, it was very easy to tell if it was my aircraft's ELT that is transmitting or someone elses.However, I don't monitor 121.5 continously while flying since I normally need my 2nd radio to listen to ATIS or monitor flight watch on 122.0.When I was flying for the airlines, it was standard procedure to keep our dispatch frequency on radio #2, when we were not using it to pick up the weather. This way we could stay in contact with the operations dispatchers at our airline.Happy Simming!Scott :-)ATP/CFII - KCOS, 6000+ Total Commercial Flight Time

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To add on to Scott's response, and maybe bring this back down to a more basic level, I would recommend using common cents. For example, if your around a metro area listen to one of the approach/departure freqs (preferably one that corresponds to the direction you are from the main area of traffic such as ac arriving/departing from the north, south, etc.) If your in a rural area then you have several options, I usually listen to either a center freq, or a local unicom freq. I live in eastern Nebraska so I prefer to listen to an approach freq as much as I can. On the weekends I fly for a local skydiving club. The biggest concern I have is someone "cruising" thru the airspace above the airport of our operations. This normally would be of no concern for a pilot to do provided he were above the pattern alt by a 1000 feet, however it never ceases to amaze me how many pilots obviously have not checked notoms to see that there is parachute activity in the area, so they come cruising right thru the drop zone. This can be helped if that pilot is listening to approach because they are monitering the area, and letting pilots know about the activity. They also give out traffic reports to area pilots based on how busy they are. (They will try and raise you by calling in the blind if your not in contact with them) Even if they are busy they still will warn ac of possible incursions. Best advice, keep your head on a swivel, and don't daydream.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Common misconception. 123.45 is not an official air-air frequency, though you will often hear people use it as such. 122.75 and 122.85 are the official air-air frequencies within the United States. I recall seeing a use for 123.45 somewhere, but I can't find an official reference to it anywhere. I think it has something to do with oceanic flights, but I could be wrong. For the official breakdown on non-atc frequencies see AIM 4-1-11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this